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Can Trados ignore sections of pretranslated text?
Thread poster: Joanne Parker

Joanne Parker  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:34
Member (2002)
German to English
+ ...
May 21, 2003


I have a request from a client, which is proving to be very annoying with Trados.

My client has sent me a pre-translated Word document and a Trados memory. The Word document contains some text in blue and some in black. My client has asked me to translate the text in black, but to ignore the text in blue i.e. not to update them in the Trados memory.

As I see it, I either have two options:

1) I can pick out the individual black sections of text and translate them using Trados (tedious) or

2) I can fuzzy through the whole text and then manually remove the Trados markings for each blue segment, and remove the relevant segments from the Trados memory using the maintenance function (even more tedious).

Has anyone come across this request before? Do you have any solutions? I thought about assigning a style type to the blue text and then telling Trados to ignore these styles, but I don\'t think this will help, since I really need to ignore the original version of the pre-translated texts.

Oh dear, all very complicated. Any help would be greatly appreciated!


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Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:34
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
Yes May 21, 2003

Two possibilities:

If the pretranslated text is enclosed as TRADOS pairs in your document (that means the original text and the translation between the Trados marks), then you can open the first segment you need to translate and then use the macro \"tw4winSetCloseOpenNextNo100Get.Main\" (the best way is to define an own shortcut for this). Then Trados will ignore anything, what was pretranslated and is marked as 100% match.

The second possibility is to change the whole blue formatted text to \"t4wininternal\" formatted text. This should be possible using the search and replace function of Word, but I must admit I never tried to do so.

Good luck



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xxxMarc P  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:34
German to English
+ ...
Alternatively May 21, 2003

Jerzy\'s suggestions are Trados-specific and so probably better in this case, but a general solution you can use in such cases, with any translation memory application, is this:

If the text already translated is marked, simply delete it. (I am assuming that the translated text is whole sentences/segments, and not just individual words.) Most word processors have an advanced search and replace function that enables you to do this (i.e. in this case. replace text in blue with nothing). Then translate what\'s left. Finally, run your translation memory against the original file.

You may, of course, be particularly interested in the parts of the text that have already been translated, for reference purposes. In that case, just keep a copy of the original file open as you work.


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Local time: 10:34
Member (2007)
German to English
+ ...
Update TM with pretranslation May 21, 2003


a workaround is to update your tm with the pretranslation. After this you can Use the Translate-To_Fuzzy Function. Trados will then only stop for untransleted segments.

Better than pretranslation is using of xtranslate.


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Marijke Singer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:34
Dutch to English
+ ...
Word Styles May 21, 2003

I think Jerzy touched on the solution I use but I thought I\'d mention it anyway.

I have a style defined in Word and when certain segments should be skipped, I apply this style to that segment and Trados skips it (you can do a global search and replace based on the colour). The style is called: tw4winExternal.

If you want I can send you a dot file. Just send me an e-mail message.

I use it to translate in tables in which a dump has been made from Deja Vu. When I have finished translating and I have cleaned up, I can copy and paste the translated column into the original document received from the customer.

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Karin Adamczyk  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:34
French to English
Why so complicated? May 21, 2003

My client has sent me a pre-translated Word document and a Trados memory. The Word document contains some text in blue and some in black. My client has asked me to translate the text in black, but to ignore the text in blue i.e. not to update them in the Trados memory.

Why not do exactly what the client asked by working around the pretranslated text. When you see a pretranslated portion coming up, close your current segment, use the Page Down or arrow keys to move past the pretranslated material and continue with the next section of black text (...unless I\'m missing something).

I doubt the client wants the pretranslated text removed.


Karin Adamczyk

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Suzanne Blangsted  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:34
Danish to English
+ ...
Trados May 22, 2003

We sometimes can\'t see the forest for the trees, and we make an easy project into a difficult task.

Karin\'s suggestion is good and is what I use.

When you start removing or changing segments, you will be spending time redefining your changes back to original status.

[Edited at 2003-05-22 04:49]

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