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Translating htm files in Tag Editor
Thread poster: CristinaPereira

CristinaPereira  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:08
Member (2005)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Feb 10, 2009

Hi everyone,

I'd like to know if it is possible to know for sure that htm files translated in Tag Editor will be okay after translating, no issues about codes, etc.

This seems pretty obvious but I was advised not to work in Tag Editor because of the codes. Rather, I had to use another programme (not a CAT tool) and basically I had to type the translation over the source text. The client was concerned about the codes being damaged. After several experiences I finally decided I could do it in Tag Editor, keeping a close eye on the other programme window so as to know what shouldn't be translated because Tag Editor can't tell the difference (these are only minor details).

But now I'm worried since it is a somewhat large project and I'd like to know if there is a way to be sure everything is okay, looking at the code, maybe? And how?

I hope I'm making myself clear, I just don't want to redo everything again in case something goes wrong and I don't know what it is.

Thanks in advance,

Cristina


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xxxOlaf
Local time: 09:08
English to German
Tag Editor has been designed to work with tagged files! Feb 10, 2009

Tag Editor is perfect for tagged files. I never had problems with it. There's a slight chance that that you might translate text that is not meant to be translated if the html file contains custom tags. But even that risk can be avoided by customizing the default html4.ini Tag Settings file.

So in short, it's perfectly safe to translate standard .html files with Tag Editor.

Olaf


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Radek Ptak
Local time: 08:08
English to Polish
straight forward Feb 10, 2009

Trados supports any HTML-like files pretty well. Of course there are some setting to be adjusted. For example "entities"... you can generate target files using entities for all sort of special characters, which is fine for let's say web browsers, or you can use RAW characters which would be probably better for let's say help compilers. The best is to translate one file and establish the best settings with your client.
Anyway, Trados is quite flexible and you can set up everything you want using INI file. If you generate HTML files you don't like, it's just a matter of changing settings and cleaning them up again.

One important thing is to remember that Trados normalizes HTML files during HTML > TTX conversion which means that, for example, all unnecessary line breaks will be removed (unless you explicitly say No) so HTML structure will be changed a little bit.

And last thing is to be careful with all sorts of bloody scripts (ie. JavaScript or VB). If there are any scripts in your HTML files, more than likely they will not be "exposed" for translation in a proper way but it's not really Trados fault. I have never seen CAT tool which deals with them properly

Radek


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CristinaPereira  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:08
Member (2005)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks for your help... Feb 10, 2009

Olaf and Radek.

I agree with you that nothing should go wrong (I already translated other htm/html files in Tag Editor). The problem is the client isn't sure. And I am not either, even if I see no big issue about it. Anyway, all the little details you mention are beyond my understanding

I'm still not sure what I'm going to do but your input will certailny help me make up my mind.

Thanks again,

Cristina


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ViktoriaG  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 03:08
English to French
+ ...
Use an advanced text editor Feb 10, 2009

There are Notepad-like text editors that you can use to check what should be translated and what should not. These usually colour-code the code itself (called syntax highlighting), so you can distinguish it from the actual content. One such text editor is Notepad++ ( http://notepad-plus.sourceforge.net/uk/site.htm ) - it is free.

You would basically translate in TagEditor, and you would be comparing what the text editor proposes as content and what translatable text TagEditor proposes.

Another option would be to use TagEditor for translation and then to review the translation in a text editor (perhaps a text editor that offers syntax highlighting). In case something is amiss, you can overwrite the problem spots in the text file, just like you do when you use the software the client wants you to use.

However, like my colleagues, I am pretty sure TagEditor will handle HTML files without any problem. I have used it many times for HTML files (including one big project of some 300 files that lasted about three weeks), and there never were any problems. The only thing I recall ever hearing is that older versions (Trados 6.5) overlook ALT tags - but I don't know if that's true.

On a sidenote, I believe that as long as you provide your client with what he has ordered, he shouldn't have a say in what tools you use. I certainly don't tell my hairdesser to only use Fiskars scissors... I am saying this because your client seems to be forcing you to use work methods that slow you down, which in turn means you make less money over the same period of time. Your preoccupation should be to ensure that what you deliver matches the client's expectations, and not what tool your client prefers.

[Edited at 2009-02-10 21:48 GMT]


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Jan Sundström  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 09:08
English to Swedish
+ ...
Use QA tools Feb 11, 2009

CristinaPereira wrote:
The problem is the client isn't sure. And I am not either, even if I see no big issue about it. Anyway, all the little details you mention are beyond my understanding


Hi Cristina and all,

You don't necessarily have to know all the details.
The only job for you is to convince the client that TagEditor is absolutely safe, and there are several safety mechanisms to catch any problem before delivery.

You should read this article:
http://www.translatorscafe.com/cafe/Articles.asp?ArtID=71

Basically, it boils down to using some QA tools to check that all the tags are intact, that no code has been touched etc.

You can use some tools that are provided with Trados, and third-party software like QAD if you feel that it's a worthwhile investment.

Together with your delivery, you can then provide QA reports, ensuring the integrity of your translation!


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CristinaPereira  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:08
Member (2005)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you Feb 11, 2009

Thanks everyone for your advice.

It reassures me, but anyway, on this specific occasion, I won't use Tag Editor anymore. I already did 10,000 words and the files look okay, but I won't put the rest of the job at risk. I'm still not sure and anyway, I think I'm spending more or less the same time not using Tag Editor, because there are a lot of files with just a few lines each one. Opening and closing them all is the worst really...

I hope this discussion will help other people too.

Thanks,

Cristina


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Jan Sundström  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 09:08
English to Swedish
+ ...
no need to open/close individual files! Feb 16, 2009

CristinaPereira wrote:
I think I'm spending more or less the same time not using Tag Editor, because there are a lot of files with just a few lines each one. Opening and closing them all is the worst really...


There's absolutely no need to do that!
You know there's a tool called Trados Glue. Just merge all the HTML files into one, and then use the same tool to split them up afterwards. The entire process is seamless!

There are other third party tools that do the same thing, if you run into problems...

/J


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