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Preparing of InDesign files prior to translation with Tageditor
Thread poster: Jerzy Czopik

Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 22:46
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
Nov 28, 2007

I'm looking for tipps, how to prepare InDesign files prior to translation in order not to have segments with too many tags. For example, now I have a file, where at the end of each printed line there is a tag in my ttx file - I of course can work with it, but it does disturb and reduce the possibility of finding matches.
Would for example selecting text and applying some formatting (similar to Word - pressing CTRL+SPACE BAR there removes overrides in font formatting) help here?

Thank you for all tipps
Jerzy


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Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 23:46
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
Linebreaks Nov 29, 2007

Hi Jerzy.
I know the problem. Once the customer was able to remove the fixed linebreaks from the source-files. But it was done in Indesign.

Regards
Heinrich


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Jan Sundström  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 22:46
English to Swedish
+ ...
Do you have Indesign installed? Nov 29, 2007

Jerzy Czopik wrote:

I'm looking for tipps, how to prepare InDesign files prior to translation in order not to have segments with too many tags. For example, now I have a file, where at the end of each printed line there is a tag in my ttx file - I of course can work with it, but it does disturb and reduce the possibility of finding matches.
Would for example selecting text and applying some formatting (similar to Word - pressing CTRL+SPACE BAR there removes overrides in font formatting) help here?

Thank you for all tipps
Jerzy


Hi Jerzy,

I have a long list of tricks that I usually perform before opeing the INX in TE.

As Heinrich suggests, this assumes you have InDesign installed and available yourself. Can you confirm that you have it?!

/Jan


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Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 22:46
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Of course - otherwise I could not prepare anything Nov 29, 2007

Yes, I have both CS2 and CS3 here.
Now I have a big job in CS2, and while the process seems to work very fine, I'm still not very satisified with the tagging. Sometimes I have sentences with too many tags - and it is obvious that these are just opening and closing formatting tags, so one at the beginning and one at the end should be sufficient. I could easily delete them, but this is InDesign. And SDL is warning for InDesign, not even to join segments or delete white spaces, if they are represented by tags!

Thank you
Jerzy


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Jan Sundström  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 22:46
English to Swedish
+ ...
Some tips Nov 29, 2007

Jerzy Czopik wrote:

Yes, I have both CS2 and CS3 here.
Now I have a big job in CS2, and while the process seems to work very fine, I'm still not very satisified with the tagging. Sometimes I have sentences with too many tags - and it is obvious that these are just opening and closing formatting tags, so one at the beginning and one at the end should be sufficient. I could easily delete them, but this is InDesign. And SDL is warning for InDesign, not even to join segments or delete white spaces, if they are represented by tags!

Thank you
Jerzy


Sorry Jerzy, maybe it was a redundant question!

Depending on how your client has formatted the original, there can be various tasks to take care of.

1. Manual line breaks (^n). Replace them with space, but use your discretion, sometimes they are legit. Use the text editor interface in Indesign, and use search/replace.
CS3 now also has enhanced the search function a lot, and even supports GREP, which is very good news! I haven't explored this, but theoretically, you can search for specific situations that have generated junk tags, like spaces that have been kerned manually by the client.

2. Like you noticed about, the same opening/closing tag it repeated several times within the same paragraph. Save as INX, open in Indesign, resave as INX again! The software rationalizes recurrences, to condense redundant tags when reopening.

3. If the document it still ridden with junk tags, there is a drastic measure. Clear all overrides! I usually work this way:
- Use the arrow tool
- Select all text boxes with Ctrl+A
- Press F11 to show the Paragraph Format pallette
- Look for any "plus sign" with a red strikethrough. This indicates an override.
- Click on the red strikethrough to clear it.
Read more about it here:
http://livedocs.adobe.com/en_US/InDesign/5.0/help.html?content=WS8CA8FE22-00E5-41db-ABB9-0E957005B002.html
Note that the document might look very ugly in Indesign after you've applied this. It all depends if the client has been disciplined and created stringent text and paragraph styles, or just started with one style, and adapted it ad-hoc.
If the translation looks ugly after re-import, you can even consider to take the untouched INX and apply your TM to it again, for a neater result the second round.

Don't hesitate to ask if any of this sounds strange...

/Jan


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Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 22:46
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you for your tipps Nov 29, 2007

The resaving as inx is new to me and I will try this first.
For my luck, those redundant tags do not occur too often, so I even can better live with them, as to try to remove.

Kind regards
Jerzy


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Jan Sundström  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 22:46
English to Swedish
+ ...
Apply "normal" as text style Nov 30, 2007

J-a-n S-ndstr-m wrote:
3. If the document it still ridden with junk tags, there is a drastic measure. Clear all overrides!
...
If the translation looks ugly after re-import, you can even consider to take the untouched INX and apply your TM to it again, for a neater result the second round.

/Jan


Hi again Jerzy,

There's one even more draconic way, similar to the above:

open all stories in the Indesign text editor view (Ctrl-Y) and apply "normal text" to the entire document. Abracadabra, no disturbing tags!

If you want to preserve italics, bold etc, you'll need to reapply those styles after translation, or rerun the untouched original against your TM, just like you'd do with the cleared overrides.

Best,

Jan


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Wojciech Froelich  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 22:46
English to Polish
adobescripts.pl Nov 30, 2007

Jerzy, check www.adobescripts.pl - if you need anything extra, please contact me (I will contact you directly with the author).

Wojtek


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