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How can I send fonts to someone?
Thread poster: Tamara Zahran

Tamara Zahran  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:26
English to Arabic
Jan 27, 2005

Dear All,

I have done this before, by copying the fonts to a folder and sending them by email. Now when I try to do the same the pasted fonts appear in a file format with ttf extension. and the won't open. I don't know what's wrong and would appreciate any help.

Thank you all in advance
Tamara


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Fuad Yahya  Identity Verified
Arabic
+ ...
copy the font to a different location first. Jan 27, 2005

I have just sent a font to an agency. I opened the Fonts folder in Windows, highlighted the font, then clicked "Copy" on the Edit menu (the "Copy" command on the context menu does not work in the Fonts folder). I pasted the font to the desktop, then opened a new message in Outlook, and attached the font I placed on the desktop.

You cannot attach a font directly from the Fonts folder.


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Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 23:26
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
Do not send fonts Jan 27, 2005

In general this is a violation of copyright rules, as would you send software and so on.
If you don't have multiple font license sent your font to someone, so you pass the license to use this font to him too, which makes the usage of that particular font by yourself (or by him, it doesn't matter) illegal.

Regards
Jerzy


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Steven Sidore  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 23:26
Member (2003)
German to English
people package fonts legally all the time Jan 27, 2005

Jerzy Czopik wrote:

In general this is a violation of copyright rules, as would you send software and so on.
If you don't have multiple font license sent your font to someone, so you pass the license to use this font to him too, which makes the usage of that particular font by yourself (or by him, it doesn't matter) illegal.

Regards
Jerzy


I have to disagree, it is not inherently illegal to send fonts, at least not in the US. It depends on the intended use. Within the publishing industry, for example, it is standard to package the fonts with the job when sending a file out to a service bureau for printing. This is the only way to insure that it will print correctly. It is understood that the printers will not retain the fonts beyond the scope of the job, and this is all legitimate practice.

This is hardly a secret practice--all of the major DTP software -- Quark, InDesign, PageMaker -- handles this process automatically. Rules may vary by country, but certainly there is no blanket ban as Jerzy suggests.

Good luck!

Steven


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Klaus Herrmann  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 23:26
Member (2002)
English to German
+ ...
Legally if they paid for it, yes... Jan 27, 2005

Steven Sidore wrote:
people package fonts legally all the time


Here's what Emigre says (bolding added):

1. The Emigre Font Software is licensed for use atone (1) location with a maximum of six (6) devices. For example: five (5) CPUs and one (1) printer.

Now one location doesn't leave much room for discussion, IMHO.

Now compare that to Linotype:

1.4 For the exclusive purpose of outputting certain files, the licensee is permitted to transfer a copy of the Font Software which is used for creating the pertinent file to a commercial printer or another service company. In the event of any text modification, the service company is required to possess its own license. The licensee has to inform the commercial printer / service company about the content of this License Agreement.

Ok, so you're allowed to include fonts in order to create a ps file, but not to edit the Quark document...


This is the only way to insure that it will print correctly.

Actually, the only way to insure that there won't be any problem is to create a PS or PDF file with everything embedded, fonts, pics, fonts used in pics, etc. There's no reason why the print shop (or service bureau) should have to touch the files.


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Ken Cox  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:26
German to English
+ ...
agree with Klaus -- giving away fonts is not allowed Jan 28, 2005

Although people certainly do send copies of fonts with documents for printing, it's usually a violation of copyright and/or licensing terms to do so. The attitudes and responses of font producers vary in this regard, but legal prosecution for violation is certainly not out of the question if other measures fail to yield results.

Giving someone else a copy of a font you have, where the person who receives it will be using it to generate or edit documents, is simply not allowed unless the font is freeware. I'm not saying it isn't done, and the chances of getting caught if the font is only used for private purposes are rather low, but a reputable commercial operation wouldn't make a practice of using fonts without having paid the licence fees. It's exactly the same situation as using bootleg software.


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Steven Sidore  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 23:26
Member (2003)
German to English
True, but doesn't quite speak to my point Jan 28, 2005

Klaus Herrmann wrote:
Actually, the only way to insure that there won't be any problem is to create a PS or PDF file with everything embedded, fonts, pics, fonts used in pics, etc. There's no reason why the print shop (or service bureau) should have to touch the files.


I think your grasp of the legals is sound, but not of the printing. High-quality printing (I worked with art books) doesn't run off of PDF, but is in fact processed at the service bureau for their particular equipment, hence the need for the fonts.

I believe the point of the clause about them needing to own the fonts relates to people who have a service bureau do the design work in-house; the font makers don't want you giving out their fonts for off-site work, which is reasonable. But at least in my case the service bureaus were instructed to make no changes. So, getting back to the original question, it still all depends on how the files are being used.

Best,

Steven


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Klaus Herrmann  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 23:26
Member (2002)
English to German
+ ...
I'm not a legal expert... Jan 28, 2005

Steven Sidore wrote:I think your grasp of the legals is sound, but not of the printing. High-quality printing (I worked with art books) doesn't run off of PDF, but is in fact processed at the service bureau for their particular equipment, hence the need for the fonts.

I'm afraid that my legal knowledge is inferior to my understanding of printing processes. If you create a postscript file using the film setter's printer driver, all the service bureau has to do is to copy the postcript file to the film setter, and that's it (copy as in C:\>Copy D:/nicecatalog.ps LPT1: using an ancient notation).

Now that CtP has made films obsolete, we're using (high-resolution) PDF files. All the print shop/service bureau has to do is the imposition, and that's it. Again, no need to give them QXD or PM files or font files.

It'a just a matter of eliminating a potential source for errors, e.g. cross-platform font problems or fonts/layouts being re-calculated differently on two different computers leading to the layout being messed up. I've seen a layout change when moving from one Mac to another, different models. Both were using identical fonts, settings, etc. The problem was due to different rounding on both computers. This won't happen if you're using .PS or .PDF files...

[Edited at 2005-01-28 10:11]


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Steven Sidore  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 23:26
Member (2003)
German to English
Let's go straight to the source Jan 28, 2005

I'm actually curious about this now. I'll write to one or more font makers asking them the official policy on this, and get back.

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Klaus Herrmann  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 23:26
Member (2002)
English to German
+ ...
Good idea Jan 28, 2005

Steven Sidore wrote:

I'm actually curious about this now. I'll write to one or more font makers asking them the official policy on this, and get back.

Good idea. Some of our fonts are being sold by Monotype, I guess I can ask them


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Narasimhan Raghavan  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:56
English to Tamil
+ ...
There is no need to send fonts at all, Klaus is right Jan 30, 2005

I encounter this problem, when sending translations into Tamil. I quietly convert the file to PDF with Acrobat-6 and that's it. To tell you the truth, my sending the PDF file is not due to the legal problem cited earlier. I was not even aware fo it. My Win XP pro has the Latha Tamil font and it is not in the form of ttf. My friend advised em to go in for the PDF solution, thus obviating the need for sending the font.

Now that I am aware of the legal complication, I will continue to do send PDF and reject with a clear conscience the client's demand for the font.

Regards,
N.Raghavan

[Edited at 2005-01-30 10:31]


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Endre Both  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 23:26
Member (2002)
English to German
Related provisions in some foundries' license terms Feb 10, 2005

Adobe:
"You may take a copy of the font(s) you have used for a particular file to a commercial printer or other service bureau, and such service bureau may use the font(s) to process your file, provided such service bureau has a valid license to use that particular font software."

Bitstream:
"You may send a copy of any Bitstream font along with your documents to a commercial printer or other service bureau to enable the editing or printing of your document, provided that such party has informed you that it owns a valid license to use that particular font software."

Elsner + Flake:
"Only for the purpose of outputting particular files may you take a copy of the font(s) you have used for such files to a commercial printer or other service bureau, and only if such service bureau has assured you that it has purchased or has been granted a licence to use the respective Font-Software."

Emigre:
Service Bureau License needed: "The service bureau license is a supplement to the basic license which permits the user to supply the font software to a printer or service bureau for imaging. This license is priced at 50% of the basic license ($19.50 per single font or style.)"

The Font Bureau:
No specific provisions.

ITC (Licensing FAQ):
"We send our files to a service bureau for final output. Is it legal for us to provide the service bureau with typefaces we use?
No. Although this has become a common practice, typefaces are licensed for use only within a single company. You may provide your service provider with copies of your ITC typefaces only if the service provider has already purchased a license for those typefaces. (Supplying font files with a print job ensures that the client’s version of the font is used for final output.) If your service bureau does not have a license for specifc typefaces, you may only supply a PostScript file containing the fonts."

Letraset:
No specific provisions.

Linotype:
Same wording as Elsner+Flake.

Monotype:
"You may take a digitized copy of the Font Software used for a particular document to a commercial printer or service bureau for use by the printer or service bureau in printing such document but only if the printer or service bureau represents to you that it has purchased or been granted a license to use that particular Font Software."

Paratype:
No related provisions.

Porchez Typofonderie:
"Other than the copy intended for the service bureau, the user cannot provide copies of the fonts to be used by a third party even if the third party uses them for the user or in the name of the user."

T26:
"You may provide a digitized copy of the Font Software used for a particular document, or Font Software embedded in an electronic document, to a commercial printer or service bureau for use by the printer or service in printing such document."

Underware:
Same wording as Monotype.

URW++:
No express provisions.


It is to be assumed that vendors whose licenses do not include specific provisions governing the transmission of fonts to service bureaus do not allow it.

Endre


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