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Subtitles for YouTube
Thread poster: babelbear
babelbear
English
Jul 8, 2008

To all professional/hobbyist subtitlers:

I've been busy for the past half year building a website that will allow you to subtitle YouTube videos directly in your web browser for free. I'm looking for subtitlers to give me feedback on how effective/ineffective the editor tool is. I started the project out of a growing frustration with the lack of subtitles for Internet video and with your help I'd like to create an open wikipedia-type community for subtitling videos starting with YouTube. Please message me or email me at justanimate at gmail dot com if you're curious or would like to help out!

Paul


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Ashima  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 04:32
German to English
+ ...
Re: Jul 8, 2008

kindly clarify..how is it possible subtitling videos directly in web browser...?
I also want to go for subtitling..& would be really happy by your assitance.

You can send your reply at ashima.dhingra@gmail.com

best regards

Ashima


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Juan Jacob  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 18:02
French to Spanish
+ ...
Hum... Jul 8, 2008

...well, yes, but:

"I'm looking for subtitlers to give me feedback on how effective/ineffective the editor tool is."

1.- Wich editor tool? Don't get it. To subtitle, you need a subtitling software... a lot of them around.

2.- I know it's possible to download Youtube files... so, I presume you can do it. And then? Can anybody subtitle the material?

3.- And more hum... Youtube is mostly music, with poor audio... very, very difficult to translate by ear. Lyrics, rimes, poetry...

4.- Translation for subtitling is not an easy thing. I exceptionaly translate a song in a motion picture... too difficult.

Let us know, though.


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babelbear
English
TOPIC STARTER
no software necessary!! Jul 9, 2008

good questions:

We've developed software you don't have to purchase or download. It works IN the browser! (think of Google Docs as opposed to Microsoft Word). You don't have to download the Youtube video either. You just view the video and edit directly on top of it. Anyone can subtitle the video. We have plans to move beyond Youtube to other video sites but for the most part, Youtube has enough content to get started with. There are plenty of video blogs, tv shows and random clips that are worth translating. I know for myself there are a lot of japanese game shows that I wish someone could translate for me.

Besides the online editor, viewers have the ability to request subtitles. This way, a subtitler like yourself, can see which video has the most demand for a specific language. You can identify what is popular and serve the most people by subtitling it.

We are aiming to have a private Beta in August and if you are interested in checking it out, and giving us feedback please let me know. We are looking for as many volunteers because we are only a small team of 3

We are trying to build an open community so that Internet video is more accessible.


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Robert Tucker
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:02
German to English
+ ...
Web Video Clip Subtitles Jul 9, 2008

I subtitled a few YouTube clips some months ago. They're at:

http://uk.youtube.com/rtview

(should you be interested.)

As I've indicated in the info column on each of them I think it would be a good idea if YouTube facilitated the posting of soft subs (.srt, .ssa, .ass etc) for clips. Once someone has timed (or spotted?) a video clip then others could download the soft-sub file and create a translation of it in their own language. If it were possible to have the YouTube Flash video play in your browser using a selected soft-sub file I think that would be great (not prohibiting the possibility to download both clip and sub file, of course).

Any tools to facilitate this form of are to be welcomed, though I don't think the likes of Jubler, Aegisub, Gnome subtitler are difficult to use, at least at a basic level. Re-submitting videos with burnt-in subs is rather heavy on the use of web-space I feel.

There are, of course, a large number of sites dedicated to fansubbing and I've indeed found the subs for at least one Bollywood film I wanted to watch on one of them.

Copyright is an issue of concern (I'm hoping the clips I've subtitled will squeeze through fair use – Nazi-era singer singing songs mostly without published English translations) and even providing translations of copyrighted material just by translating what one hears will probably constitute breach of copyright. I just hope it wouldn't be considered too serious an offence (with deletion of one's YouTube channel) even if the video one has added soft-subs to, given the facility, is pulled for copyright reasons.


[Edited at 2008-07-09 07:49]


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babelbear
English
TOPIC STARTER
soft subs Jul 9, 2008

Robert - I've built exactly what you're talking about. We've created a flash editor that layers soft subs on top of YouTube videos (no burnt in subtitles!!). Very soon we will be able to use the template of one language for people to port to another easily. As soon as our private Beta is released I would love your feedback. Looks like your ideas are very much aligned with ours!

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Barbara Salardi  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 01:02
English to Italian
+ ...
Interesting... Jul 9, 2008

That sounds really interesting because burning videos with subtitles is a long process (or maybe I didn't find the right software to do it quickly yet). I would love to know more about this tool, especially about its efficiency, so let us know.

By the way, if anyone is interested, I recently subtitled a few YouTube videos:
http://uk.youtube.com/user/PrincessMildred



[Edited at 2008-07-10 00:41]


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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 20:02
English to Portuguese
+ ...
It's not the software... Jul 9, 2008

Barbara Salardi wrote:

That sounds really interesting because burning videos with subtitles is a long process (or maybe I didn't find the right software to do it quickly yet).


Barbara,

The speed in burning subtitles is in the hardware. A friend told me that by switching from a simple Pentium IV with 1 GB RAM to a quad-core notebook with 2 GB, his subtitle burning time was reduced 3:1 (same video, same software).


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Juan Jacob  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 18:02
French to Spanish
+ ...
Bravisimo to Barbara. Jul 9, 2008

I saw your subtitled video.
Very good job, indeed!
And a very funny video, too!

Two suggestions:

1.- Put yellow, not white. It's better.
2.- Sometimes, subtitles are "too long" to read. Try to cut some words. (That's our main problem: we HAVE to cut, for simple readibility factors).

In general: well, this is interesting.
Count on me, keep in contact.


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babelbear
English
TOPIC STARTER
no need for fast hardware Jul 10, 2008

Soft subs makes it possible to create subtitles in real time. No need to download the source, make a final mix and reupload it - all you do is create it right in your browser. We would love to show you that you don't have to do things the old fashioned way anymore! I will keep you posted!!

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Barbara Salardi  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 01:02
English to Italian
+ ...
Thank you José, Juan and I'll wait for Babelbear feedback :) Jul 10, 2008

José Henrique Lamensdorf wrote:

Barbara Salardi wrote:

That sounds really interesting because burning videos with subtitles is a long process (or maybe I didn't find the right software to do it quickly yet).


Barbara,

The speed in burning subtitles is in the hardware. A friend told me that by switching from a simple Pentium IV with 1 GB RAM to a quad-core notebook with 2 GB, his subtitle burning time was reduced 3:1 (same video, same software).




Thank you José, I didn't know it is a matter of hardware.


Juan Jacob wrote:

I saw your subtitled video.
Very good job, indeed!
And a very funny video, too!

Two suggestions:

1.- Put yellow, not white. It's better.
2.- Sometimes, subtitles are "too long" to read. Try to cut some words. (That's our main problem: we HAVE to cut, for simple readibility factors).

In general: well, this is interesting.
Count on me, keep in contact.


Thank you very much Juan for your comments and your suggestions, they're really helpful. Indeed it is very difficult to cut words or find shorter words for subtitles, I am always so concerned with the right meaning and conveying it as accurately as possible, so cutting words is really painful, but I guess I'll learn how to do it.


I'll keep in touch to know the developments of babelbear's tool.


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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 20:02
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Hardware Jul 10, 2008

Barbara Salardi wrote:
Thank you José, I didn't know it is a matter of hardware.


Of course, the Codec you use makes a lot of difference, but to simplify it at its most, what happens is this:

One DVD frame is (NTSC) 720x480 pixels, i.e. 345.6 KB. At 29,97 fps, it means 10 MB per second. Multiplying by 60, it's 600+ MB per minute, i.e. about one full CD-ROM per minute, if uncompressed. So compression is absolutely necessary.

How does compression work? Among other things, it takes a full frame and divides it into several small rectangles. Then, for a variable number of frames after it, the computer compares each frame with that complete one and, if their are identical, it "says" unchanged to the identical squares, and only saves the "different" ones. So if your video is just a newscaster speaking on the screen, the "squares" where there will be most changes will be on his/her face. On the other extreme, if it's some sport, such as soccer or a car race, with the camera panning and zooming all the time, most squares everywhere will be different.

Of course, there is a lot more to it, and many other things going on, but this rather crude explanation should give you an idea on why these partial image comparisons mean heavy processing work, so a more powerful processor will do it faster. RAM (memory) also plays an important role, as you must have both "squares" separately available somewhere for trhe processor to compare them. If your RAM is small, it will use the hard disk, which is much, much slower.

I gave you before an idea on the difference from a single to a quad processor. Now, about memory... In the good ol' days when I had a 486 DX 40 MHz with 4 MB RAM, I had it renderize a 45-sec video. It took 27 hours to do it! The machine was wholly taken, unavailable for anything else. So I doubled its RAM to 8 MB. It did the same job, with the same software, in only 8 minutes. Hard disks were pretty slow then.

So if you work often rendering video, it's worth investing in hardware muscle. Just don't go overboard with it. Always check the cost/benefit of each improvement. For instance, there will be a point where adding more memory won't make a difference with the same processor, which will be limiting the speed. Conversely, a faster processor with the same amount of RAM might not accelerate the process at all. A faster hard disk may speed up the process, but only to a certain extent.

I don't have the most powerful hardware in the market, actually far from it. But it processes all my video workload satisfactorily overnight while I'm asleep. If my load increases, a more powerful setup will pay for itself rather quickly. But I won't upgrade until I need it. Faster hardware pops up every week, while prices go down and down.

One American computer implementation pioneer once told me, when the Apple II was a novelty: "It takes a million dollars to make the first unit of a new processor. Then it takes another million to produce all units that will be made until it becomes obsolete." I don't know about the current figures, but the proportion should be similar.


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Michael79  Identity Verified
China
Local time: 07:02
Member (2009)
English to Chinese
+ ...
Which target language(s) do you want Jul 11, 2008

Hi

Your projects looks great. and I happen to be a hobbyist subtitlers as you mentionged for Youtube sometimes.

I am not sure that which language will be subtitled for your project?

English along? or any other language? Please let me know so that I can contribute some of my thought on subtitling endeavor.

cuz I only translated what I heard from those Youtube clips before subtitling Chinese into them.


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babelbear
English
TOPIC STARTER
(virtually) all languages possible Jul 11, 2008

Hi Michael! Great questions! I can't believe I didn't mention that already. The system is built in such a way that whatever languages your computer supports are automatically supported on the site. We don't restrict the character sets. So far we've created categories for:

Arabic, Basque, Catalan, Chinese, Danish, Dutch, English, Esperanto, Farsi, Finnish, French, Georgian, German, Greek, Gujarati, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Maltese, Portuguese-Brazil, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish, Thai, Turkish, Vietnamese

If you know of a language we missed please let us know and we'll create a slot for it. I look forward to having your feedback!!


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babelbear
English
TOPIC STARTER
BabelBear.com BETA 8.8.08 Aug 1, 2008

Our year long project will be opening its doors in one week! August 8, 2008, Babelbear.com will be available for you to explore and begin subtitling youtube videos. Spread the word! I look forward to hearing what you guys think and would love to take your suggestions.

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