Mobile menu

chemical german for teaching professionals
Thread poster: Natalie Hamela
Natalie Hamela  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:59
French to German
Mar 10, 2005

Hello,
I have a little problem. I'm teaching german for adults, and for the first time I will teach adults working for the chemical industry. They are very motivated and want to learn german (for beginners), but with chemical terms of a high level, in order to be able to read chemical articles in a very short time....
Du you have any ideas, where I can find a good website with chemical articles and also dictionnarys with chemical terms?
Thanks a lot for helping me out!
Natalie


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Kim Metzger  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 16:59
German to English
Chemical German Mar 10, 2005

Hi Natalie,
First I have some questions: do you know a lot about chemistry? Will you be able to explain German chemical texts to your students?


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Kim Metzger  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 16:59
German to English
Chemical German Mar 10, 2005

Well, I certainly don't know much about chemistry. My Chinese-American chemistry teacher gave me an F (lowest grade and richly deserved) in her high school chemistry class. If I were in your situation, I might use something like this:

http://www.vokabeln.de/v2_Chemie_Verbindungen.htm

It lists the German terms along with the chemical designations. Since the students are beginners, they're going to have to learn basic vocabulary and grammar first. But you could start substituting chemical terms very early on. Let's say you're teaching a lesson about a kiosk that sells Bratwurst and Bier. Two fellows are standing in front of the kiosk and looking at the menu. They are talking to each other about what they should buy.

Conversation:
Das da! Wie heißt das? Wie heißt das auf deutsch? Tee.
Möchten Sie ein Glas Tee? Oder möchten Sie eine Flasche Bier?

Change the situation. Now the fellows are in a chemistry laboratory.

Das da! Wie heißt das? Wie heißt das auf deutsch? Arsensäure.

Möchten Sie Arsensäure? Oder möchten Sie Bariumhydroxid?


[Edited at 2005-03-10 21:40]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Natalie Hamela  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:59
French to German
TOPIC STARTER
dont't know nothing about Mar 10, 2005

Kim Metzger wrote:

Hi Natalie,
First I have some questions: do you know a lot about chemistry? Will you be able to explain German chemical texts to your students?


Hello Kim,
no I do not know anything about it....


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Natalie Hamela  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:59
French to German
TOPIC STARTER
it will be more complicated Mar 10, 2005

Hello Kim,
thank you for this idea. I was also thinking about that. But the client was telling me in clear words, that he will start very quick and not learn these easy sentences... Perhaps he is a very intelligent one... Well, let's see. Thank you for the site you've given me.
Perhaps there is someone in the forum, who has made such an experience with professionals of the chemical industry?


Natalie


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Natalie Hamela  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:59
French to German
TOPIC STARTER
chemical dictionnary french-german Mar 11, 2005

Hello again,
I forgot to say the most important thing - I will teach FRENCH professionals from the chemical industry in german, so I need a dictionnary with chemical words in french-german/german-french, which is accessable by internet.
Thanks again.
Natalie


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Gillian Scheibelein  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 00:59
Member (2003)
German to English
+ ...
. Mar 11, 2005

Hi Natalie,

I took a "German for chemists" course at while at university. This was aimed at reading/understanding texts from Ge>En and not En>Ge or speaking the language.

I can't find my notes at the moment, but as far as I remember, the first few lessons were based on the basic vocabulary for experimental procedures, which are the easiest to understand:

verbs, e.g. mix, boil, weigh, add, evaporate etc.
nouns, e.g. the individual pieces of equipment, powder, solid, liquid, identification procedures.

Once we'd assimulated these words, we then went on grammar and started to analyse simple texts by underlining the verbs in blue and nouns etc. in red to get a feeling of what goes where in a German sentence. This gave us the bones of the whole thing and the instructor then went over the text sentence for sentence with the "der,die,das,den,des,dem" bit (didn't want to put us off too early!)

We gradually changed to more complicated texts as time went by.

Of course, it depends on what your chemists actually do in the industry. If they are working as lab techies they will need an entirely different vocabulary from those who will need to read research texts. But whatever you do, don't let them near a patent until they are reasonably proficient!

You don't say whether the adults are French or English, if they are the latter, the journal "Angewandte Chemie" from Wiley also publishes an international edition so they could have parallel texts.

Hope this helps a bit
regards,
Jill


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Websites you were looking for Mar 11, 2005

Natalie Hamela wrote:

Hello,
I have a little problem. I'm teaching german for adults, and for the first time I will teach adults working for the chemical industry. They are very motivated and want to learn german (for beginners), but with chemical terms of a high level, in order to be able to read chemical articles in a very short time....
Du you have any ideas, where I can find a good website with chemical articles and also dictionnarys with chemical terms?
Thanks a lot for helping me out!
Natalie



Hi Natalie

They already know chemistry but what they need is the operational language, which you will teach them. They would also need assitance in finding the best specialised dictionary much like the one you are after. I know places where you can find one in Australia but not in your country. However, here are the links to German chemistry websites,the first being the best I would say. Your German should help you in extending this search.

Jana

http://www.schulchemie-online.de/
http://www.omikron-online.de/cyberchem/cheminfo/cheindex.htm
http://www.experimentalchemie.de/index-01.htm


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Natalie Hamela  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:59
French to German
TOPIC STARTER
thank you all Mar 12, 2005

Hello and thank you for your answers and help. I think the idea from Gillen with the method of beginning with colors in the text, is a good one.
For the dictionnary, Jana and Kim, surely there are chemical sites in german in the internet. But for me is important to have the chemical words in both languages, french and german. Surely the client does know his french words, but I do need them, too.

Yours Natalie


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

chemical german for teaching professionals

Advanced search






LSP.expert
You’re a freelance translator? LSP.expert helps you manage your daily translation jobs. It’s easy, fast and secure.

How about you start tracking translation jobs and sending invoices in minutes? You can also manage your clients and generate reports about your business activities. So you always keep a clear view on your planning, AND you get a free 30 day trial period!

More info »
SDL MultiTerm 2017
Guarantee a unified, consistent and high-quality translation with terminology software by the industry leaders.

SDL MultiTerm 2017 allows translators to create one central location to store and manage multilingual terminology, and with SDL MultiTerm Extract 2017 you can automatically create term lists from your existing documentation to save time.

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs