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One bluetooth, two ..... ?
Thread poster: yanadeni
yanadeni  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 22:22
French to Russian
+ ...
Apr 5, 2008

If you have 1 bluetooth, you say bluetooth, but when you have 2, would you say blueteeth or bluetooths?

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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 20:22
English to Spanish
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I woukd say... Apr 5, 2008

"I have two bluetooth devices".

Hows that for copping out? But I suppose one could hear either one of the two possibilities you mention.


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ViktoriaG  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 22:22
English to French
+ ...
Is there such a thing as a Bluetooth? Apr 6, 2008

If I am not mistaken, this word is not a noun and therefore doesn't need to agree with anything (you'd say Bluetooth device like you'd say red device or eletronic device - and you can't say "it's a red" or "this is my electronic"). It would then be wrong to append an S to it, or to put it in plural form by saying Blueteeth...

In short, I agree with the above post. By the way, Bluetooth always starts with a capital.

[Edited at 2008-04-06 04:03]


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avsie  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:22
English to French
+ ...
Registered trademark Apr 6, 2008

Bluetooth is a registered trademark; AFAIK, trademarks cannot be abbreviated, made singular when plural or made plural when singular. Unless the trademark becomes genericized (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genericized_trademark#Legal_concepts for a quick explanation) to the point that it loses its capital letter and becomes a common noun... even though this happened to other brand names in the past (teflon, nylon, etc.), I think Bluetooth is still somewhat safe

[Edited at 2008-04-06 05:15]


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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:22
Member (2000)
Russian to English
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No consistency to rely on Apr 6, 2008

Leaving aside the copyright issue, I don't see how you can decide between the two options.
One goose, two geese.
One mongoose, two mongooses.


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Erik Hansson  Identity Verified
Germany
Member (2002)
Swedish
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Technological attribute Apr 6, 2008

Viktoria Gimbe wrote:

If I am not mistaken, this word is not a noun and therefore doesn't need to agree with anything (you'd say Bluetooth device like you'd say red device or eletronic device - and you can't say "it's a red" or "this is my electronic"). It would then be wrong to append an S to it, or to put it in plural form by saying Blueteeth...



[Edited at 2008-04-06 04:03]


My opinion as well. Bluetooth is a technological attribute and a description of the connection, like just wireless, cable-connected etc, so there's nothing like "a Bluetooth". Bluetooth device sounds OK, and thus the plural should be the devices. Nobody could say "I would like to buy three Bluetooths" - just like you can't say "I would like to buy three wirelesses".


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Kathryn Litherland  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 22:22
Member (2007)
Spanish to English
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bluetooth is a specification Apr 6, 2008

there's only one of it.

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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:22
Member (2000)
Russian to English
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Three wirelesses Apr 6, 2008

Many years ago, when "wireless" was a more common term in UK English for what is now called "radio", and was also used as a short form for "wireless set" (radio receiver), I'm sure I could have asked for three wirelesses and no-one would have thought it at all unusual.

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Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:22
Member (2006)
French to English
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Yellow Pages Apr 6, 2008

Jack Doughty wrote:

Many years ago, when "wireless" was a more common term in UK English for what is now called "radio", and was also used as a short form for "wireless set" (radio receiver), I'm sure I could have asked for three wirelesses and no-one would have thought it at all unusual.


Agreed, Jack. What about this? - an advertisement for Yellow Pages - "Yellow Pages is your best friend". Yellow Pages *are* your best friend - *are" your best friends ???
Best wishes,
Jenny.


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Madeleine MacRae Klintebo  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:22
Swedish to English
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Careful Jack Apr 6, 2008

Jack Doughty wrote:

Many years ago, when "wireless" was a more common term in UK English for what is now called "radio", and was also used as a short form for "wireless set" (radio receiver), I'm sure I could have asked for three wirelesses and no-one would have thought it at all unusual.

And Dixon of Dock Green might have requested the pleasure of your company in order to discuss some small problems he had with with black marketeers....


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Textklick  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:22
German to English
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Agree Apr 6, 2008

Jack Doughty wrote:

Many years ago, when "wireless" was a more common term in UK English for what is now called "radio", and was also used as a short form for "wireless set" (radio receiver), I'm sure I could have asked for three **wirelesses** and no-one would have thought it at all unusual.


OED: 1932 R. A. Knox Broadcast Minds i. 13 "We say the wireless... For the wireless, in England, is a unique force; there is no question of two wirelesses differing, as two newspapers may differ in their outlook."

And just for fun - going further back in the OED: 1904 Times 15 June 4/1 "The country is full of wireless."

Ignoring the written context, I think I would ask for "two Bluetooths" in a shop. (I have never been in the position of purchasing more than one mouse). The awkward thing is about a generic term being a brand. What would Sir James Dyson say were he to hear someone asking for "Two of those Dyson hoovers?"

However, in writing, I think that the 'device' suffix as variously suggested is appropriate.

Pleasant Sunday slumbers
Chris


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Thorson
Local time: 04:22
Danish to English
As in Harald Bluetooth, 14th King of Denmark? Apr 6, 2008

YaniQC wrote:

If you have 1 bluetooth, you say bluetooth, but when you have 2, would you say blueteeth or bluetooths?


Harald had one blue tooth, but Jane has two blue teeth.

Blue teeth are teeth which are basically dead.

The Bluetooth system is named after Harald, btw.

[Edited at 2008-04-06 23:48]


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John O'Shea
Mexico
Local time: 21:22
Spanish to English
+ ...
Bluetooths (at some moment in the future, if not now) Apr 7, 2008

There's a section in Steven Pinker's "The Language Instinct" that explains in a very engaging way why we say computer "mouses" instead of "mice", etc. So if "Bluetooth" is becoming a Kleenex- or Hoover-type word, then it will very probably end up as "Bluetooths" (sorry, can't give you chapter and verse as I have lent the book out and, inevitably, haven't seen it in eons). I do however agree that "Bluetooth devices" is the way to go until this seems to have become common parlance.

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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:22
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
Computer mouses? Apr 7, 2008

Who says computer mouses? I don't, and hardly anyone else does according to Google.
"Computer mouses" 31,900 hits (which include "computer mouse" because even in quotation marks Google will give you singular as well as plural); "computer mice" 419,000 hits.


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Thorson
Local time: 04:22
Danish to English
A mouse is a device--Bluetooth is a system Apr 7, 2008

John O'Shea wrote:

There's a section in Steven Pinker's "The Language Instinct" that explains in a very engaging way why we say computer "mouses" instead of "mice", etc. So if "Bluetooth" is becoming a Kleenex- or Hoover-type word, then it will very probably end up as "Bluetooths" (sorry, can't give you chapter and verse as I have lent the book out and, inevitably, haven't seen it in eons). I do however agree that "Bluetooth devices" is the way to go until this seems to have become common parlance.


A mouse is a device, but I would still say two computer mice.

Bluetooth is not a device, it's a communications system. There is no such thing as a Bluetooth.

There is a Bluetooth headset, or a Bluetooth dongle, etc.


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