taxation words- translate or not
Thread poster: MAGDALENA GLADKOWSKA

MAGDALENA GLADKOWSKA
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:47
Polish to English
+ ...
Jul 28, 2008

The thing is that I am translating 'Working for yourself' guide into Polish.
I am quite new and lots of questions turn up, though this one is coming back to me quite regularry.
Lots of Polish people who do not know English tend to use the original names in English instead of trying to translate them e.g. National Insurance not Ubezpieczenie Społeczne, Home Office not Ministerstwo Spraw Wewnętrznych. Now my question is should I, while translationg the guide, use:
- Polish name for a word, then English equivalent in brackets
- opposite, English (original version from the guide) and then Polish equivalent in brackets
- use just the English version, and give the equivalents only in the contents
Sometimes there are like really long names of institutions, so I am not sure if the idea with writing the equivalent of them will really work.
I was looking for the answer to that question and found out that some translators just do as they like.
I would like to become professional translator one day, so I would really appreciate putting my on the right track. Thank you.

I would like to apologise in advance if I did something incorrect, but that is my first time on a forum.


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Lesley Clarke  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 17:47
Spanish to English
In my humble opinion... Jul 30, 2008

You should leave the names of institutions in English and put their translation in brackets after the first time the name appears. Same with Laws too.

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Allesklar  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 08:17
English to German
+ ...
depends Jul 30, 2008

Depends a lot on the type and purpose of the translation and its target audience.

You can use google and maybe even Kudoz to find out if there are any established terms in your language for them. If you do translate, also include the country of origin to avoid confusion (e.g. Home Office = British Interior Ministry).

In your case, including the English names will make it easier for your readers to find further references.


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MAGDALENA GLADKOWSKA
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:47
Polish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
many thanks Jul 30, 2008

Thank you for your help Allesklar and Lesley.

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blacksake
Mexico
Local time: 17:47
Spanish to English
+ ...
...I agree! Aug 1, 2008

Yes, I agree with both of the previous comments. I think that it really depends on the target translation and audience you're doing. I'd say that you should use English with the brackets in polish, when your target public is going to be occidental. But when your target public is going to be Polish it would be better to do it the other way around. It happens the same thing with "anglicisms" in spanish and when I am translating with those, I just leave them like that and properly explain in contents or within brackets.

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MAGDALENA GLADKOWSKA
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:47
Polish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
purpose of the translation Aug 4, 2008

You are asking me about the purpose of this translation so let's say it is to help Polish people living in Scotland to understand the rules of being self-employed, information leaflet.
You were saing that is ok if we

use English with the brackets in polish, when your target public is going to be occidental. But when your target public is going to be Polish it would be better to do it the other way around

but if many people simply use the English version and it is even easier for them to use this English word (when they need to feel in a form, go to HMRC) then its Polish equivalent, so....

So maybe better it would be to use just English words and Polish in brackets, what you think??? This is for Polish people, but what I noticed is that sometimes when I use Polish equivalent of an English word, then they do not know what I am talking about.

What do you think?


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N.M. Eklund  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 00:47
Member (2005)
French to English
+ ...
Check with client Aug 5, 2008

Hi Magdalena,

I worked on several guide books for a client. It was part translation/part writing, since I was given the technical information in French and told to put it all together into a comprehensible guide book for people interested in working and living in France.

I was confronted with the same questions as you. In normal translations I leave the terms in French and the translation in brackets right after; or in footnotes if there would be too many brackets in the text.
In this situation, there were really too many terms. The reader would not have found it easy to read these guides if I included all the little translations (even in the footnotes). So, I contacted my client and suggested making a Glossary of terms, especially since the translation of certain terms did not necessarily mean exactly the same thing in English, and required some explanation.
They were very happy with this solution.
Maybe this could be an option for you.

Hope this helps.
Natalia

[Edited at 2008-08-05 14:44]


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N.M. Eklund  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 00:47
Member (2005)
French to English
+ ...
Check with client Aug 5, 2008

doublon

[Edited at 2008-08-05 15:14]


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Charlie Bavington  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:47
French to English
English (Polish) Aug 5, 2008

MAGDALENA GLADKOWSKA wrote:
but if many people simply use the English version and it is even easier for them to use this English word (when they need to feel in a form, go to HMRC) then its Polish equivalent, so....

So maybe better it would be to use just English words and Polish in brackets, what you think??? This is for Polish people, but what I noticed is that sometimes when I use Polish equivalent of an English word, then they do not know what I am talking about.

What do you think?


If what you say is true, I think that "English term (Polish explanation/translation)" is the way to go, especially if you are likely to consistently refer to something throughout the text using the English term.

In my limited experience (France, since you ask), expats do tend to pepper their language with terms from the country they are living in, and you can also see this on websites for expats (ones for English people in France will just talk about a "notaire" or "les impots" or "la cave", or a "carte de sejour", for instance, with no comment at all).

Given what it is for, I think your idea is best. Especially since, in the long run, the audience IS going to HAVE to start using the English terms, when speaking English, to Brits, about the subjects in question.


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MAGDALENA GLADKOWSKA
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:47
Polish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
thanks Aug 5, 2008

Many thanks to all of you.

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