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Translation certification in the UK?
Thread poster: Tanya Lawson
Tanya Lawson
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:32
English to Czech
+ ...
Jun 14, 2003

Hi,
I would be very interested in learning more about the procedure of translation certification in the UK.
Thank you,
Tanya


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Clarisa Moraña  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 16:32
Member (2002)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Institute of Linguists Educational Trust Jun 14, 2003

Why don't you browse the web site of the Institute of Linguists Educational Trust

The Institute of Linguists Educational Trust is an awarding body which organises public vocational examinations in a wide range of languages from post-"A" level equivalent to post-graduate equivalent levels. A number of these have been accredited by the QCA, or are in the process of being accredited.


It includes a Diploma in Translation

Regards,

Clarisa Moraña


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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:32
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
You mean certification of translations, not of translators, don't you? Jun 14, 2003

If you do, then the previous answer, though interesting, does not address the question.

Someone asked recently about certification of translations by a notary public in the USA, where there seems to be a recognized procedure for this.
As far as I know, this is not the case in the UK. Most agencies will accept a certificate from the translator him/herself provided that said translator holds a recognized qualification such as IoL or MITI. I have occasionally been asked to have a notary public or solicitor certify that a translation is a true one, and I have actually approached them, but they always say, quite reasonably in my view, that there is no way they can certify a translation if they don't know the language themselves. So in such cases I tell the agency or customer this, and they either decide to accept my own certification or I don't hear any more from them.

[Edited at 2003-06-14 22:49]


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Tanya Lawson
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:32
English to Czech
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you Jun 15, 2003

Thank you kindly for your answer.
I've heard that some clients request to have a notary or solicitor certification but it did not make much sense to me (and I'm glad I am not the only one if they do not speak given language.
Thank you again for clarifying the situation for me and sharing your information.
Tanya

Jack Doughty wrote:

If you do, then the previous answer, though interesting, does not address the question.

Someone asked recently about certification of translations by a notary public in the USA, where there seems to be a recognized procedure for this.
As far as I know, this is not the case in the UK. Most agencies will accept a certificate from the translator him/herself provided that said translator holds a recognized qualification such as IoL or MITI. I have occasionally been asked to have a notary public or solicitor certify that a translation is a true one, and I have actually approached them, but they always say, quite reasonably in my view, that there is no way they can certify a translation if they don't know the language themselves. So in such cases I tell the agency or customer this, and they either decide to accept my own certification or I don't hear any more from them.

[Edited at 2003-06-14 22:49]


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Tanya Lawson
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:32
English to Czech
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you Jun 15, 2003

Thank you Clarisa for the information. I'm sorry I haven't made myself clear in my question. I've meant to find out how/if self-certification of translated documents work in the UK.
But thank you for you response anyway.
Tanya

Clarisa Moraña wrote:

Why don't you browse the web site of the Institute of Linguists Educational Trust

The Institute of Linguists Educational Trust is an awarding body which organises public vocational examinations in a wide range of languages from post-"A" level equivalent to post-graduate equivalent levels. A number of these have been accredited by the QCA, or are in the process of being accredited.


It includes a Diploma in Translation

Regards,

Clarisa Moraña


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DGK T-I  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:32
Member (2003)
Georgian to English
+ ...
Certification in the UK Jun 15, 2003

The idea of a notary notarizing (or of swearing an oath before a commissioner for oaths, etc) in the UK, would be as a legal registration of the translator's declaration that he or she understands the contents of the source document , the translation is an accurate representation of it, and that the translator is competent to know (the declaration the translator would make in a UK certification).
This isn't a routine part of certifying a translation in the UK, and I would expect it to be described as a sworn or notarized translation - but if and when it was needed for anything, the responsibility is still on the translator not the notary, etc.


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xxxjuliamr79
English to Spanish
+ ...
Are we talking about sworn translation? Jun 16, 2003

I don\'t know how it works in UK, but I can tell you how this is in Spain. Normally only translations of legal documents (such as birth ceritificates, sales contracts, etc.) need to be certified. This means that only translators appointed by the Government (sworn translators), who have passed a competitive exam and who are registered as such,are legally enabled to translate those documents. If you have a text which needs to be certified by a notary in order to be legally binding before a court or any other official body, and you need to have it translated, then you need a sworn translator.
I guess the situation is the same in any European country.

I hope I helped you somehow!


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DGK T-I  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:32
Member (2003)
Georgian to English
+ ...
Not the same in the UK, though :-) Jun 16, 2003

juliamr79 wrote:

I don't know how it works in UK, but I can tell you how this is in Spain. Normally only translations of legal documents (such as birth ceritificates, sales contracts, etc.) need to be certified. This means that only translators appointed by the Government (sworn translators), who have passed a competitive exam and who are registered as such,are legally enabled to translate those documents. If you have a text which needs to be certified by a notary in order to be legally binding before a court or any other official body, and you need to have it translated, then you need a sworn translator.
I guess the situation is the same in any European country.

I hope I helped you somehow!


Hi Julia,

I'm sure you're right for Spain, but
that's the special Spanish way of doing things, similar I believe to what is done in some other countries, but not in the UK, though.
It might be a good idea to briefly check exactly what the client needs a document for and where, (unless it's obvious) - to make sure it's getting the right sort of certification, notarizing, swearing or whatever - there being a number of international variants in what is meant by these names

I have no idea what a UK sworn or notarized translation might be used for - my guesses might be for use in a court of law, or for use by a foreign legal or admin. system that would only accept that, perhaps ?

If someone of Jack's knowledge hasn't needed to provide one (a UK type sworn/notarized translation that is), then they can't be very common.

[Edited at 2003-06-17 15:24]


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lydiar  Identity Verified
New Zealand
Local time: 08:32
Member (2006)
French to English
Further Info please Aug 27, 2003

I have read this thread with interest following the advertisement of a job on the jobs postings which requires certification, I wondered if someone could address the issue of certification for UK translators once and for all.

Is it fair to say that in general a formally qualified (University, IoL or ITI or other such) translator can call themselves 'certified' to translate documents such a birth certificates etc. for official use?

If this is true then is it enough for the translator in question to just get themselves a stamp made up that says roughly (I think this is right) and then sign it? - possibly on nicer quality paper?

Does anyone out there do this kind of work in the UK and how do they approach it?

Apologies if this is old ground, but after a fairly through search I hadn't found anyone advice that was very specific (apart from Jack's whose advice I suspect is spot on - but which would make applying for a job which specifically asks for certification a problem)


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lydiar  Identity Verified
New Zealand
Local time: 08:32
Member (2006)
French to English
Further Info please Aug 27, 2003

Apologies if this is a repeat post - but I think my initial attempt failed ot register.

So,

Can I make a request for clarification regarding 'certified' translations in the UK.
If I understand correctly Jack is saying that in the UK translations don't get certified legally, and the most would be a statement signed by the translator to the effect that as far as they are concerned it is correct.

I am keen to find out if this is 'fact'. Not because I don't believe Jack:) but because there is a job advertised on the jobs board which explicitly asks for 'certification' of translated birth certificates etc for official/immigration purposes.

Does anyone do this kind of work regularly? How do they deal with it?

Any comments gratefully recieved.

Lyds


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lydiar  Identity Verified
New Zealand
Local time: 08:32
Member (2006)
French to English
ITI/ATC Aug 27, 2003

I decided to follow up my question with a trawl of Google (possibly should have done this first!)

I found the following in the ITI FAQ :

4. I need an "official" or "certified" translation, can ITI help me?
For most purposes, this usually requires either using the services of a sworn translator (this would be a translator sworn before a court in a non-UK jurisdiction), or a Fellow (FITI) or Member (MITI) of ITI who may self-certify the translation. You can also have the translation notarised before a Notary Public or Notary Scrivener (usually listed in Yellow Pages). ITI publishes a set of guidelines and seals for self-certification by its members.

In addition, www.transaction.co.uk/CorpSite/includes/maintext/ hintsandtips/certificates/certificates.doc

Is a useful doc.

Lydia


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