Mobile menu

Where does your translation end up?
Thread poster: Cristina Heraud-van Tol

Cristina Heraud-van Tol  Identity Verified
Peru
Local time: 09:39
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Nov 19, 2008

After finishing an interesting translation, and receiving nice comments from the client, I many times wonder where does my translation go to? How it's being used? How many people I've helped understanding the subject? Have you had the chance? I think only twice I had the chance to know it:

1) I translated a brochure for a conference about biology; the man who hired me and another girl, took us to the printer, chose the colors and format, and the brochures were printed a week later. We could see our work on hardcopy.

2) I translated several documents about conservation and environment for a company. They gathered the texts and made a book out of it. My name appeared on the list of acknowledgements as the translator who had translated all texts. Finally, they added astonishing wildlife pictures and colors to the book, had it printed, and I got a beautiful copy.

But I wonder what happened with all the hundreds of translations I've ever finished...?

[Edited at 2008-11-19 15:14 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Maria Diaconu  Identity Verified
Romania
Local time: 17:39
English to Romanian
I also wonder... Nov 19, 2008

From time to time, I check on Google to see if something appears on line
But it rarely happens...


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Sergei Leshchinsky  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 17:39
Member (2008)
English to Russian
+ ...
one book, but a big one Nov 19, 2008

During one of the TACIS projects in the CIS, we translated a lot of materials that were gathered later into a book and published. I have one. And I am proud, though the team of translator is not mentioned (it is an old soviet establishment tradition to forget the actors). (Anyway I can show the source and target files as well as other by-stuff to those who doubt...) This book was disseminated all over the country of the project. I have other published translations, but this one is the most noticed...

[Редактировалось 2008-11-19 21:00 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:39
English to German
+ ...
Baffled, flabbergasted and bewildered Nov 19, 2008

How can you possibly do translations if you don't have the slightest idea what they are meant for?

How do you choose your tonality, your style, your wording, how can you speak, if you don't know who you are talking to?

I hope I don't sound cranky, I am just curious.



Direct link Reply with quote
 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 11:39
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Video for dubbing Nov 19, 2008

There is a special sensation when I first watch a finished video that I translated for dubbing. Of course it's my duty to work the metrics so that the dubbers will be able to mock up what looks like lip-sync. But their work requires a lot of talent, because I deliver a written script, black on white, in Arial 14 pt. bold. The dubbers, coordinated by the dubbing director, add art to my technique. Later, technicians will adjust their bare voices to the surrounding environment on the screen, and thereafter will mix music and sound effects, to create that feeling in the spectator, that it was originally produced in the language it was dubbed.

Fortunately, as I work mostly with training and corporate video, my translations are usually dubbed by the best artists, directors and technicians in the market. They always come out great!

I had several occasions to watch the whole dubbing process. It's a rare learning experience for any translator for video dubbing. Such opportunities should not be missed.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Cristina Heraud-van Tol  Identity Verified
Peru
Local time: 09:39
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Hi, Nicole Nov 19, 2008

Nicole Schnell wrote:

How can you possibly do translations if you don't have the slightest idea what they are meant for?

How do you choose your tonality, your style, your wording, how can you speak, if you don't know who you are talking to?

I hope I don't sound cranky, I am just curious.



--------------

No, you don't sound cranky

What I mean is the following: I sometimes apply for a job whose title is, let's say, "Medical translation of 3000 words". I then make the translation, probably assuming it's for a hospital (in many cases translations are confidential, so they don't even give you the name of the company), I get paid in about 30 days, and that's it.

But what I wonder is: What do they do with your translation? Is it part of a publication or a letter they are just planning to give away? Was the agreement you translated useful for a company to invest millions in a project? The legal translation you've just finished sent somone to jail? Did somebody manage to assemble correctly the garden table of the manual you've translated? Did you really make a difference in somebody's life? Was it ever used? I know cases of complete proofreadings of an English book but at the end nothing was done about it.

In most cases, I think you never know.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Anne Koth  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 16:39
German to English
Sweet and sour Nov 20, 2008

It is nice when you are sent a copy of whatever it is you have translated, to see what the final result looks like: the brochure or book often looks even more professional than your Word file! I'd love to see a video, like José.

It's less pleasant when you discover that the client has changed something and spoilt your nice translation. I remember translating a jokey A-Z list once and being so pleased that I found a way to translate it with 26 entries, one for each letter. I then saw it published with some changes so that it wasn't a perfect A-Z any more.
A book I did was also published with a mistake (not mine!) on the front cover.

Sometimes I've translated brochures aimed at international tourists but originally written for Germans, and although I've tried to make it clear what certain local specialities are, and have told the customer that it needs more explanation for people who don't know Germany, I know they sometimes end up published with no explanations or cut even shorter so that tourists will probably be left scratching their heads wondering who exactly this "famous" George Bähr is.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Marie-Hélène Hayles  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:39
Italian to English
+ ...
Various places Nov 20, 2008

Inside boxes of medicines, read by the English or American expert a desperate Italian wants to consult about his or his child's complicated condition, added to information on a clinical trial, read by patients in a clinical trial, published in scientific journals, in the list of SOPs needed in English to get international certification, in promotional materials...

[Edited at 2008-11-20 14:51 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Hengky Chiok  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:39
Member (2008)
English to Indonesian
+ ...
Not very often Nov 21, 2008

Cristina Heraud-van Tol wrote:

After finishing an interesting translation, and receiving nice comments from the client, I many times wonder where does my translation go to? How it's being used? How many people I've helped understanding the subject? Have you had the chance?


It does not happen very often, but I can remember some:
1. Press releases: I can usually see my translations published by the Government's news agency and probably even quoted by other publications.

2. My translation for a big Christian organization was published and I still keep the hard copies (brochures, slides, pamphlets).

3. I was told very kindly by a PM and her super that a workshop material I translated was a big help to the participants. It was good to know that.

And of course as an interpreter I have more chances to observe people's response to my renderings. Some of them are very very kind and really made your days.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Richard Bartholomew  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 16:39
Member (2007)
German to English
Where did it go? Next office over. Nov 22, 2008

Once apon a time not so long ago, I completed a translation at the customer's site. They gave me a desk and PC right next to the boss's office. So the translation didn't really "go" anywhere; it stayed on the PC where I created it.

In this case, I would have known for whom I was writting even if I'd never met the customer. The boss, coworkers, and in fact the entire environment, were essentially identical to their counterparts in the USA. The only real difference was the language.

In most cases, though, I don't know what happens to the translation. For all I know, the customer changes his mind after receiving the translation and chucks the whole thing into the waste basket. The exception is when the translation gets published on a web site where I can view it just like any other member of the world-wide public.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tomás Cano Binder, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 16:39
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Thank you for a very interesting topic Nov 23, 2008

Cristina Heraud-van Tol wrote:
After finishing an interesting translation, and receiving nice comments from the client, I many times wonder where does my translation go to? How it's being used? How many people I've helped understanding the subject?


Indeed I think about this very often and try to seize any opportunity to get hold of printed samples of my work, either copies of company catalogues or magazines my customers can send over, brochures I can find at a local dealer of the brand, etc. It's great to see your translations printed in full colour and with nice pictures!

Of course, very many translations are meant for users of big, expensive machinery and getting hold of copies of the manuals would be hard. I will try from now on as a result of this topic!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tomás Cano Binder, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 16:39
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Misunderstanding? Nov 23, 2008

Nicole Schnell wrote:
How can you possibly do translations if you don't have the slightest idea what they are meant for?


I think you misunderstood what Cristina was saying. She did not say that she was not aware of the purpose and target audience of her translations. She only wonders who, what people in particular, and where in the world, will use her translations.

A desire that is just the result of how translation agencies work with us I reckon!


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxVerse 5B
Local time: 16:39
English to Serbian
+ ...
... Nov 23, 2008

Well, I have been an in-house interpreter ( and translator) for a number of years, and then you can easily see where your translation ends up!

I mostly did interpreting, and then it would usually end up into the air of a conference room. lol



Direct link Reply with quote
 

lbone  Identity Verified
China
Local time: 22:39
English to Chinese
+ ...
Some haven't shown up Jan 4, 2009

I clearly see most of my translations for my direct clients. But for agencies...

I translated some web sites.

But often after 1 year, I found a site I translated is still monolingual.

[Edited at 2009-01-04 04:47 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Annett Hieber  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 16:39
English to German
Mostly I do not see the end result...unfortunately! Jan 6, 2009

For me it's the same as for many of you: most of the time I do not get any feed-back at all. Though, I hear from time to time from my end customers that they are very satisfied with my work. But, I think it depends on the field you work in and on the text type. I mainly translate technical texts such as manuals, descriptions and documentations that are shipped to my clients' clients together with machines. On the other hand, I also translated image brochures for several clients and was sent the final version for proof-reading. Of course, it's very nice and makes you proud to see what became of your work! I wish I had more opportunities to receive any kind of feed-back from clients - be it end clients or agencies - it is motivating! Maybe some outsources happen to read this forum....

Annett


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Maria Castro[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Where does your translation end up?

Advanced search


Translation news





Déjà Vu X3
Try it, Love it

Find out why Déjà Vu is today the most flexible, customizable and user-friendly tool on the market. See the brand new features in action: *Completely redesigned user interface *Live Preview *Inline spell checking *Inline

More info »
Wordfast Pro
Translation Memory Software for Any Platform

Exclusive discount for ProZ.com users! Save over 13% when purchasing Wordfast Pro through ProZ.com. Wordfast is the world's #1 provider of platform-independent Translation Memory software. Consistently ranked the most user-friendly and highest value

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs