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Using Client Source Files for Editing
Thread poster: Jeff Skinner

Jeff Skinner  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 03:10
Swedish to English
+ ...
Feb 12, 2002

Hello all! I\'m a brand-new freelancer (i.e. I think I can translate and am looking for jobs on the side) - so please go easy if I\'m asking totally obvious questions.



The thread on converting PDF documents into text files had a couple of posts about getting the original source files from your client if at all possible instead. My question is this: How do you use that source file for editing? Do you make a copy of the source file and enter your translation into that one, referring to a printout of the original file as you go? Or how is that handled?


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Ursula Peter-Czichi  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 21:10
German to English
+ ...
Track Changes Feb 17, 2002

Quote:


On 2002-02-12 19:54, Olentzero wrote:

Hello all! I\'m a brand-new freelancer (i.e. I think I can translate and am looking for jobs on the side) - so please go easy if I\'m asking totally obvious questions.



The thread on converting PDF documents into text files had a couple of posts about getting the original source files from your client if at all possible instead. My question is this: How do you use that source file for editing? Do you make a copy of the source file and enter your translation into that one, referring to a printout of the original file as you go? Or how is that handled?





Here is what I do:

1. I make a copy (to be on the safe side).

2. I make another copy on a disk (to be even safer.

3. I open one of the copies:

3a. In MS Word: goto Tools, then

3b. Choose: Track Changes.



The rest will be very easy to see.



If you want to make suggestions, rather than changes:

Go to: View -> Toolbars -> Editing.

Look at the new toolbar and check out the task icons, you\'ll see.

More questions? Keep asking.

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Erika Pavelka  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:10
French to English
It's really up to you... Feb 18, 2002

Dear Jeff,



Quote:


On 2002-02-12 19:54, Olentzero wrote:

The thread on converting PDF documents into text files had a couple of posts about getting the original source files from your client if at all possible instead. My question is this: How do you use that source file for editing? Do you make a copy of the source file and enter your translation into that one, referring to a printout of the original file as you go? Or how is that handled?





Ultimately, it\'s up to you. It makes things a lot easier for you if you have both the original file and translation. Track changes (in Word) is one way of showing which changes you\'ve made, but from my experience, I\'ve found that many clients don\'t know how to use this function, so when they open the document full of marks, they seem to panic and not know what to do. You should ask whether or not they want to see the changes before starting editing.



Good luck,



Erika



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Klaus Herrmann  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 03:10
Member (2002)
English to German
+ ...
Edit a copy of the original file and use PDF as reference Feb 19, 2002

My approach:



1st: Create a copy of the original file.

2nd: Rename the copied file (typically appending -ge for German).

3rd: Edit the copied file, overwriting whatever needs to be translated.



I prefer using the PDF file as reference because it\'s easier to switch back and forth between the word processor and Acrobat (easier using the keyboard, that is), and because this way, I don\'t risk to accidentally edit the original.



As Erika said - ultimately, it\'s up to you...


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Jeff Skinner  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 03:10
Swedish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks for your input, everyone! Feb 20, 2002

I seem to have phrased my question poorly, but the answers are indeed informative.



I was thinking more of the situation in which you\'ve been given a source file to translate, not a target file to edit. Does it make sense to save a new copy of the source file and treat that copy like a palimpsest - overwriting the source text with your translation?


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Daina Jauntirans  Identity Verified
Local time: 20:10
Member (2005)
German to English
+ ...
Make a copy and type over Feb 21, 2002

I make a copy of the source file (always keep one copy of the source for proofreading against later), then rename the copied file to indicate that it is the translation. Then I type over the text that is there with my translation - this avoids you having to recreate formatting.

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Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 03:10
Member (2002)
German to English
+ ...
My 2 euro-cents worth: Feb 22, 2002

Okay, this is going to be a bit long, but bear with me - I think it will be worth it in the end



I have my computer set up like this:



I have my personal files all in one place - under a master folder called personal.... I think it\'s really important to keep work and private stuff separate - even though its all on the same computer.



I have my translation files all in one place, under a master folder called translations.



Under translations, I have folders called



- administration (where I keep invoices, order confirmations I\'ve sent, correspondence, etc. - all in separate folders)

- background (general stuff I\'ve found that I\'ve downloaded and find useful to use on a regular basis)

- translation memory (where I keep my trados files)

- work files (where I keep my work....)



My work files folder again has subfolders - one for each customer, each called the name of the relevant customer.



Each customer folder then has at three subfolders: incoming, ongoing and final.



Confused yet? I hope not....



Now when a file comes in from a customer, I copy the original into the relevant customer\'s incoming folder. I always keep these files - for proofreading and for finding stuff (i.e. terminology) later if for some reason I\'ve not done the translation using my memory or entered terms I\'ve found into my terminology database.



Then I make a copy of the file, stick an \"e-\" in front of its name so I can tell that it\'s the translated version (I only work into English) and stick that into \"ongoing\". I keep ongoing files for a few months after completing the job, and then go through and wipe them.



After translating, I print out the \"e-\" file in ongoing and proofread it against a printout of the orinal file in \"incoming\". I make my changes to the file, and save the final version in the relevant customer\'s \"final\" folder. I also keep the final files for a long time!



If I have a big job on with many files, lets say customer ABC\'s annual report for 2001, then I will create a folder under customer ABC incoming called \"annual report 2001\", and stick all the incoming files in there. Then I replicate this structure under ongoing and final....



It\'s important to keep the incoming and final files as a pair, so that you can, for example, do an explorer search on a source language term or phrase you are sure you\'ve translated before, and then find your previous translation in the relevant final folder.



I\'ve never not been able to find anything!



There\'s one golden rule - never change the name of the customer\'s file (apart from adding the prefix \"e-\" or similar). If you have an incoming file called one thing and a final file called something totally different, you\'ll never be able to find anything.....



Okay, it was a bit long winded, but I hope it helps (you, and maybe a couple of other translators....) .



Alison


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