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3-letter currency code BEFORE or AFTER amount?
Thread poster: Hilary Davies Shelby

Hilary Davies Shelby
United States
Local time: 00:07
German to English
Mar 5, 2005

Hello all!
Not sure which forum I should be posting this to - mods, please feel free to move it!
I just proofread a text and changed the currency notation. The translator had actually written "Euro 36", which I changed to "36 EUR". He has since asked me about this. I had thought that writing the 3-letter abbreviation after the amount was correct in English (UK) but am willing to be corrected! (I have seen both in articles and am now confused!)

I've tried looking up the correct notation on the Internet, but haven't got very far. Can anyone help?

Best,

Hilary.


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xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 07:07
Spanish to English
+ ...
before Mar 5, 2005

Here is a link with complete info:

http://publications.eu.int/code/en/en-370301.htm

Position of the ISO code or euro sign
In English, the ISO code or euro sign is placed before the figure, separated by a non-breaking space, e.g. EUR 30.

In all other languages the order is reversed, e.g. 30 EUR.


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Amy Williams  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:07
Italian to English
+ ...
EUR 30 Mar 5, 2005

I've always written it like that, but you've made me think!

Thanks for the link, Cindy.


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Derek Gill Franßen  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 07:07
German to English
+ ...
My method... Mar 5, 2005

I've never really gone and looked for the correct way to do it, but I think writing amounts in the following form is the most practical: 3.250,00 EUR or 3,250.00 EUR (it also works with the €-symbol).

That way, if the amount appears at the end of a sentence you don't end up with a mixture of numbers, dots and commas, e.g. EUR 3,250.43.

I think it just looks better if there is a word or symbol at the end of the sentence (it also happens to be the in the same order as when you speak it). But maybe it's just me...

[Edited at 2005-03-05 20:03]


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John Jory  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 07:07
Member (2004)
English to German
+ ...
Currency code / currency symbol Mar 5, 2005

If the three-letter currency code (ISO 4217) is used, it ALWAYS goes in front of the value.

If currency symbols are used, some countries put the symbol in front, others behind the value.

The symbols $, ¤, £ always go in front.

These rules apply for invoicing, price lists, etc.
However, in normal copy, reading is easier if the currency code comes after the value (which corresponds with the way one speaks).

[Edited at 2005-03-05 20:11]


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RobinB  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 07:07
German to English
Before, always Mar 5, 2005

Hilary,

The three-digit ISO code always appears *before* the figure, and there is properly a space between the code and the first digit. The euro symbol also appears before the figure, but without a space.

It can get confusing because in German, it normally appears after the figure. But it's the same with e.g. percentage symbols, where there's no space in English after the figure, but there is in German.

You never, ever write "Euro 36" in English. Firstly, you wouldn't write "dollar 36", would you? Secondly, of course, euro is lower-case. This is pure Germlish and is evidence of a seriously confused translator.

I'm afraid that Derek's "I think it looks nicer" approach may soothe his artistic pretensions, but it's actually a translation error, period. And we don't get paid for translation errors.

Robin


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Derek Gill Franßen  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 07:07
German to English
+ ...
Errors & Pretensions Mar 5, 2005

RobinB wrote:

I'm afraid that Derek's "I think it looks nicer" approach may soothe his artistic pretensions, but it's actually a translation error, period. And we don't get paid for translation errors.


I wasn't pretending to know for sure; I even said that I hadn't looked into it. But I suppose you are right about not getting paid for errors - I definitely made one: I guess I wasn't talking so much about "ISO" numbers, but rather the four-letter word "EURO." Put I'll have to remember this discussion in case I do run across such numbers.

[Edited at 2005-03-05 20:21]


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xxxcmwilliams  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:07
French to English
+ ...
Definitely before Mar 5, 2005

As Cindy has pointed out, in the UK, the currency code goes before the amount. This is also true of symbols such as £, $, €. It's £30, GBP 30, EUR 30.

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Rosa Maria Duenas Rios  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:07
Just for the record... Mar 5, 2005

In Canadian documents, the correct way is 30 CAN $. (30 $ CAN, in French). So the rule is not the same in every place.

[Edited at 2005-03-05 23:10]


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xxxLatin_Hellas
United States
Local time: 07:07
Italian to English
+ ...
International Currency Markets Mar 6, 2005

Anyone who has ever had real experience in the international currency markets knows that the three-letter symbol goes before the amount as a matter of standard.
Having said that, it is true that even banks, or any type of company, in their financial statements may express currency and amounts in any number of ways.
So, it is probably best to use the international standard, but then conform to the customer's wishes if some other form is preferred.

Best,

Steve


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Charlie Bavington  Identity Verified
Local time: 06:07
French to English
Interesting Mar 6, 2005

So, it would appear that so far:
UK Eng (and possibly the international standard) would be EUR 30, GBP 30, USD 30 etc
Every other language writes 30 EUR, 30 GBP, 30 USD. Which, as Derek has pointed out, corresponds to how you'd say it. So I confess I have tended to leave it thus hitherto (and no-one has complained and I've had repeat work so....).

But, I'd love to do it properly, so is there a neat way to use search and replace in Word to switch 'em round, and only them (not mangle the entire text!).

Indeed, what would be truly groovy would be a single search and replace command that would take 12 345,67 EUR and change it into EUR 12,345.67 since that seems to be what is needed Anyone got one?


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nyusya2000
English to Russian
Word search and replace command Mar 7, 2005

Charlie Bavington wrote:

Indeed, what would be truly groovy would be a single search and replace command that would take 12 345,67 EUR and change it into EUR 12,345.67 since that seems to be what is needed Anyone got one?


I have a Russian version of Word, but I’ll try to guess what the English one might say. Here’s what you should do:
1. You press Ctrl+F (or Edit>Find)
2. Press Replace tab
3. Fill in the Search and Replace fields and press “Replace all” button.
That’s it!


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Natalie  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 07:07
Member (2002)
English to Russian
+ ...

MODERATOR
Windows settings Mar 7, 2005

Charlie Bavington wrote:
Indeed, what would be truly groovy would be a single search and replace command that would take 12 345,67 EUR and change it into EUR 12,345.67 since that seems to be what is needed Anyone got one?


Control panel > International settings > Currency settings


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MMUlr  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 07:07
English to German
+ ...
Confirmed by ISO rules ... Mar 7, 2005

Hi Cindy,

without having taken a closer look at any rules, I have done this already: placing the currency code after the amount (for German texts) and before the amount in English. Nice to be confirmed now by these EU and ISO rules ...)
Thank you for the link!

Margret Ulrich


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