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Australian English vs European English
Thread poster: AllTranslations
AllTranslations  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 05:37
Member (2003)
English to Ukrainian
+ ...
Nov 17, 2005

Hi,
A new customer of me asked whether there is a difference between European English and English for Australian/ New Zealand.

Is there any difference?

Thanks for helping me further!

Rob


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scooty
Local time: 05:37
English to French
Yes, they're different Nov 17, 2005

Just like US English and British English are different, Australian English is different too.
Here's an interesting link to an article on Australian English :
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_English


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Costanza T.
Italy
Local time: 05:37
English to Italian
+ ...
English people Nov 17, 2005

Of course, there is a difference.
The first one is the accent/pronunciation. I can recognize the English accent, because it is very different from American one, for example. I think there are also different words such as
lift - elevator and so on.
Only English people can give you the best answer to this question!!!


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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:37
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
This topic might interest you. Nov 17, 2005

http://www.proz.com/post/162874

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AllTranslations  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 05:37
Member (2003)
English to Ukrainian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Australian Slang Nov 17, 2005

Jack Doughty wrote:

http://www.proz.com/post/162874[/quote]

Interesting, but the English I am looking for is business English and not for spoken slang...

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Robin Salmon  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 14:37
German to English
+ ...
Some US English influence Nov 17, 2005

I migrated to Australia from England 16 years ago but have not worked in the "corporate sector"; just in teaching and taxi-driving.

While driving a taxi for five years, I used to take Sydney business people to offices here in Perth and picked up expressions they used, like "I'll run it past Tony in the morning" and "Could you just give me a ball-park figure, Julie?"

I have just Googled in vain for "Australian business terms".
My general impression is that Australian (and possibly NZ) business English is more influenced by US English than by the UK or European version.

There should not be much of a problem in Australians understanding terms from European English, with the high proportion of British migrants we have.

Robin Salmon


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cello  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:37
Spanish to English
+ ...
Have a look at this, mate! Nov 17, 2005

http://www.travel-library.com/pacific/australia/stybr-language.html

This is a glossary, but if you type "australian english" in Google, you get lots of possible links.

Cambridge publishes an "Australian English Stlye Guide"

http://www.cambridge.org/uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=0521434017

if you're interested in buying...:-)


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AllTranslations  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 05:37
Member (2003)
English to Ukrainian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Australian vs US English Nov 17, 2005

Robin Salmon wrote:

I migrated to Australia from England 16 years ago but have not worked in the "corporate sector"; just in teaching and taxi-driving.

While driving a taxi for five years, I used to take Sydney business people to offices here in Perth and picked up expressions they used, like "I'll run it past Tony in the morning" and "Could you just give me a ball-park figure, Julie?"

I have just Googled in vain for "Australian business terms".
My general impression is that Australian (and possibly NZ) business English is more influenced by US English than by the UK or European version.

There should not be much of a problem in Australians understanding terms from European English, with the high proportion of British migrants we have.

Robin Salmon


Hi Robin,

Thanks for your information. The clien I have, wants to get the best translation made for his target group. This is a software marketing brochure and website. Can we just use American English (what we need too), or do we have to localize for Australia? Your fair opinion is highly appreciated.

Rob


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A Hayes
Australia
Local time: 14:37
Use an Australian writer/translator Nov 17, 2005

I would recommend against using American English. If anything, written Australian English is more similar to British Eng.

Cheers,
a.

[Edited at 2005-11-17 13:31]


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Robin Salmon  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 14:37
German to English
+ ...
US English dominating computer world Nov 17, 2005

Hi Rob

I would say that when it comes to software, Australians, like most English speakers, bow to US spelling and terminology ("disk", not "disc" and "color" not "colour" etc.). Put another way, there are few "home grown" Australian software terms, if any. I translate and proofread into Australian English, when asked to do so. There are a good number of everyday terms that are different: back garden>back yard, silencer>muffler, break>recess (at school), light-bulb>globe, etc. In this case, unless there are a lot of examples where everyday English is used, there should not be a problem with using American English.

Robin Salmon


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Wouter van Kampen
Thailand
Local time: 11:37
Danish to Dutch
+ ...
Right on Nov 17, 2005

Yes, an Australian version of the Oxford concise dictionary is on the market. Need I say more

Hire an Ozzie when you target the Australian consumer market. Hire a Kiwi when you want to sell to people that prefer wearing boots.

Why do NZers always wear boots? In NZ men are men and sheep are nervous. [if the moderator finds this a bit on the edge, he/she is welcome to edit]

A Hayes wrote:

I would recommend against using American English. If anything, written Australian English is more similar to British Eng.

Cheers,
a.

[Edited at 2005-11-17 13:31]


[Edited at 2005-11-17 14:07]


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ponsaccl
English to Swedish
What do you mean with European English? Nov 17, 2005

If you mean British English then I would say little difference, except the many dialects of the British Isles versus the practically one dialect of Australia.

When I use the term European English I think of a non native English as spoken by all those very fluent non- British Europeans. The difference between their English and Australian English is vast in a way. They are all non native speakers, and although quite fluent, they tend to take the language far too literally, because that's what you naturally do with a language that is not yours. I grew up in Sweden and have spent nearly my whole adult life in Australia, and have always suffered from taking the language too literally, so I know that it is a serious problem for non native speakers.

I disagree with the English Australian that Australian is much like American. Yes indeed, it is different from British English, but it is still in fact much more like British English than like American. Some Australian expressions are both unbritish and unamerican. The pronunciation is a composite of English dialects, and sounds much more like an English dialect than anything American.

As a teacher I feel correct in telling the students that Americanisms are acceptable but that the British English versions are by far preferable. Americanisms do slip in, eg most queenslanders pronounce France as the Americans do, whereas in Victoria and New South Wales it is more as in British English. But spelling is, where-ever obvious, much better given like British English does it. Nevertheless, the line between the language styles is very hazy. There are easy ones like eg: colour vs color and: grey vs gray. But what about: colonise vs colonize and many others that you spend your whole life learning, only to realize that you spoke a hotch potch anyway, as do many British as well.

In General the Australian attitude is "Don't worry, be happy" or "Take it easy, Mate."

Cecil


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Ken Cox  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:37
German to English
+ ...
you always want a native when you're trying to sell something Nov 17, 2005

...is the golden rule for advertising and promo texts. I agree that you should at least have an Aussie native review the text (and there may even be significant differences between Australia and NZ).

If the audience is technical, you may get away with quasi-American or quasi-British English, but for a general audience you want the real thing.

Think of it this way: who yould choose to write an ad text for Flanders: a Dutchman or a Belgian?


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Robin Salmon  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 14:37
German to English
+ ...
Jack's topic - liable to cause injury Nov 17, 2005

Hi Jack

I have just got round to reading the topic you started last year - thanks for the link.

The post below yours has had me in tears, quite literally. Just what I needed after a day of translating how to make biodiesel from rapeseed! It is, however, fair to say that many Aussies are equally ignorant of the way of life in Europe (which does not include UK, most believe). I still have my Scottish accent (surprised?) and many think I am Irish. I once took a Scottish pound note into a bank here and the girl wondered if it was worth the same as the Engish pound (I once had three pence deducted when I used one in England, mind you, which goes to show that many people are suspicious/ignorant of other countries and their inhabitants). That last point is demonstrated so brilliantly in the "tourists' questions" post.

Thanks for the laugh!

Robin Salmon


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chica nueva
Local time: 17:37
Chinese to English
No difference Nov 18, 2005

For NZ, use British English. That is what we use, although we have our own New Zealand accent. We are part of the British Commonwealth and a lot of us (I'm guessing around 75%) are of British or Irish descent.In dealings with NZ Maori (around 15%),some knowledge of Maori values may be useful.

A lot of our systems are British with some modifications. It is a different environment here though, in these 'settler' countries, as compared to Europe. Different society, different values... best to visit! If you can't visit, then perhaps browse the news (or search on a topic) on this site.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/

IMO 'plain' language is best here - clear and courteous.

Good luck.


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