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The 3 manners of translation
Thread poster: chopra_2002

chopra_2002  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 01:01
Member (2008)
English to Hindi
+ ...
Mar 4, 2006

As far as I know, there are three ways to translate:

1. One writes the translation on paper and then types it.

2. One dictates the translation to the typist, who types it.

3. One types the translation directly by deleting the source text.

Is there any other way to translate? Which one do you follow?


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Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:31
Flemish to English
+ ...
Dictate to the computer Mar 4, 2006

One dictates the translation to the computer.

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Dan Butuza  Identity Verified
Romania
Local time: 21:31
Member (2005)
English to Romanian
Another one Mar 4, 2006

Uses a CAT tool, then cleans-up.


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chopra_2002  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 01:01
Member (2008)
English to Hindi
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Wow! Mar 4, 2006

Is this done with the help of some voice recognition software?


Williamson wrote:

One dictates the translation to the computer.


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Daniel Bird  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:31
German to English
One reads off the hard copy... Mar 4, 2006

...e.g. this dratted pdf I have here, types into one's favourite WP and does a fair job of recreating the formatting.
(Provided one has negotiated a higher rate than usual to account for awkward source text)
DB


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Tracey Denby  Identity Verified
Local time: 19:31
French to English
+ ...
Language recognition software Mar 4, 2006

langclinic wrote:

Is this done with the help of some voice recognition software?


Williamson wrote:

One dictates the translation to the computer.


This can be done using software such as "Dragon". Also Windows XP has a dictation feature. I haven't used it myself but a fellow translator speaks very highly of it. You should be able to find instructions in the help function under "language bar".


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Balasubramaniam L.  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 01:01
Member (2006)
English to Hindi
+ ...
MSWord has this facility Mar 4, 2006



Is this done with the help of some voice recognition software?




MSWordXP has this facility. You will of course need to have a sound card and mike to talk to.

You read out a sample text which is similar to the text to be translated and the computer prepares a database of sound-pattern-text pairs. The larger the sample, the more accurate will be the text generated by the computer.

If the text to be translated is very like the sample, you can get up to 90 per cent accuracy in what the computer converts to typed words.

It works for English. I don't know whether Hindi Office also has this facility.

In MSWordXP, go to Tools Menu and select Speech and follow the instructions.


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Silvina Matheu  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 16:31
Member
English to Spanish
on paper???? Mar 4, 2006

langclinic wrote:


1. One writes the translation on paper and then types it.



Is there any translator who still works in this way? How can he/she manage with deadlines?


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Angie Garbarino  Identity Verified
Local time: 20:31
Member (2003)
French to Italian
+ ...
agree Mar 4, 2006

langclinic wrote:1. One writes the translation on paper and then types it.


Why writing on paper?

Is there any translator who still works in this way? How can he/she manage with deadlines?


Yes impossible


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chopra_2002  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 01:01
Member (2008)
English to Hindi
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you, Bala... Mar 4, 2006

...for your great suggestions. You are always so helpful!


Balasubramaniam wrote:



Is this done with the help of some voice recognition software?




MSWordXP has this facility. You will of course need to have a sound card and mike to talk to.

You read out a sample text which is similar to the text to be translated and the computer prepares a database of sound-pattern-text pairs. The larger the sample, the more accurate will be the text generated by the computer.

If the text to be translated is very like the sample, you can get up to 90 per cent accuracy in what the computer converts to typed words.

It works for English. I don't know whether Hindi Office also has this facility.

In MSWordXP, go to Tools Menu and select Speech and follow the instructions.


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chopra_2002  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 01:01
Member (2008)
English to Hindi
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
If the subject matter is technical... Mar 4, 2006

...and complicated it is not always possible to type the translation directly. But if the text is simple, I don't face any difficulty in typing the translation directly.

Silvina Matheu wrote:

langclinic wrote:


1. One writes the translation on paper and then types it.



Is there any translator who still works in this way? How can he/she manage with deadlines?


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 12:31
English to Spanish
+ ...
Then and now Mar 4, 2006

Then (20-35 years ago) I would write the translation on paper, a typist would type it, then other people would proof it, corrections would be made and it would be submitted to the client.

If it needed to be typeset, there were several more proofings involved, back and forth.

Now: I type the translation directly by deleting the source text while preserving the original format, ready to go! Or in working with paper documents, I type the translation directly and re-create the document, ready to go!

Then: I had a tremendous callous on my finger, huge stacks of legal pads and very legible handwriting.

Now: I have forgotten how to use cursive handwriting, can only use barely legible printing.

Then: Turnaround time, 1 week or more (in the same city only).

Now: Turnaround time, often the same day, anywhere in the world.

Then: Stuck in the same place all the time.

Now: Anywhere in the world I feel like going!


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Trudy Peters  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 14:31
German to English
+ ...
I don't understand Mar 4, 2006

[quote]langclinic wrote:

If the subject matter is technical and complicated it is not always possible to type the translation directly. But if the text is simple, I don't face any difficulty in typing the translation directly.
[end quote]

I don't understand why you can't type a technical translation directly into the computer. You can always make changes if you need to. It's not like the old typewriters, where you had to start all over if you changed your mind on the wording.

I can't even imagine handwriting a 20-page translation!


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xxxSanjiv Sadan
Local time: 01:01
English to Hindi
+ ...
I rarely do so. Mar 4, 2006

On 96% occasions, I dictate the translation to my typist or type it directly when he is not available. It is just 4% times, when I have to write. I remember I was forced to write the translation on paper some 7 months back as the subject matter was legal and one sentence contained as many as 135 words with numerious clauses. The construction was complicated and it was very difficult to ascertain the subject and its predicate. So, I had to think a lot before giving the translation a written shape. But fortunately, this happens rarely and most of the times, I dictate the translation as I consider it to be a fast, accurate and convenient method.


[quote]Trudy Peters wrote:

langclinic wrote:

If the subject matter is technical and complicated it is not always possible to type the translation directly. But if the text is simple, I don't face any difficulty in typing the translation directly.
[end quote]

I don't understand why you can't type a technical translation directly into the computer. You can always make changes if you need to. It's not like the old typewriters, where you had to start all over if you changed your mind on the wording.

I can't even imagine handwriting a 20-page translation!


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jaswinder singh  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 01:01
English to Panjabi
+ ...
In India, this is a rampant example Mar 5, 2006

[quote]Trudy Peters wrote:

langclinic wrote:

If the subject matter is technical and complicated it is not always possible to type the translation directly. But if the text is simple, I don't face any difficulty in typing the translation directly.
[end quote]

I don't understand why you can't type a technical translation directly into the computer. You can always make changes if you need to. It's not like the old typewriters, where you had to start all over if you changed your mind on the wording.

I can't even imagine handwriting a 20-page translation!


Indian Languages have this sort of problem. 70% of translators don't have computer and even if they have it they are not inclined to work on them, because language typing takes more time than English one. Even those who type don't know the formal-asdf ;lkj pattern. They go for a single finger typing.

There are translators who don't want to bother about typing and technicalities of computer and fonts. They usually work for agencies, thus writing on paper.

Even the agencies find this way profitable. Because in this way, don't have to much (some time only 1/4 of what they are getting). If the work is regular kind they employ two or three translators and get all the languages similar to these typed from same typists.



[Edited at 2006-03-05 12:00]


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