Handwritten & typed doc - proper tx format
Thread poster: Jennifer Gal

Jennifer Gal  Identity Verified
Hungary
Local time: 18:57
Hungarian to English
+ ...
May 26, 2006

I am translated a document that has three types of text on it.

1.) The form itself (preprinted, boilerplate)
2.) Some info. typed in to the form
3.) Some info hand-written into the form

It is a legal document. Do I need to distinguish those from e/o in some special way? I was planning to just use three different fonts, that are the closest match to the respective writing styles. Advice anyone?

Jennifer Gal
French/Hungarian/English


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:57
English to Spanish
+ ...
Sounds good! May 26, 2006

Your own suggestion sounds like a good way to handle it.

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Jennifer Gal  Identity Verified
Hungary
Local time: 18:57
Hungarian to English
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TOPIC STARTER
Thanks May 26, 2006

Thanks, Henry. I always want to err on the side of safety, so I appreciate being able to run these matters by my virtual colleagues.

Have a great weekend!

Jennifer Gal


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mónica alfonso  Identity Verified
Local time: 13:57
English to Spanish
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You should indicate the meaning of each font. May 26, 2006

Using different fonts can be a good idea, but I would say you should state the 'meaning' of each one in a Tranlsator's Note at the beginning of the document.

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Jennifer Gal  Identity Verified
Hungary
Local time: 18:57
Hungarian to English
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TOPIC STARTER
Good idea - thank Mónica May 26, 2006

I'll do it as you said. Thanks for the input.

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Paul Merriam  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:57
Member (2008)
Russian to English
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Talk to your client May 27, 2006

If time permits, and assuming your client hasn't already told you something different, I would recommend sending a short e-mail saying something along the lines of "I plan to handle it this way. Any objections?" But I think your way is a very good way to handle it.

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Jennifer Gal  Identity Verified
Hungary
Local time: 18:57
Hungarian to English
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TOPIC STARTER
another good suggestion May 27, 2006

Thanks, Paul. I will do that. In this case, the client is very flexible, almost too flexible. As long as immigration will accept her doc, she doesn't care if I write it in crayon!

But I'll cover myself by sending a confirmation note.

Have a great Saturday!

Jen Gal


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Riccardo Schiaffino  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:57
Member (2003)
English to Italian
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Use square brackets May 27, 2006

Jennifer Gal wrote:

I am translated a document that has three types of text on it.

1.) The form itself (preprinted, boilerplate)
2.) Some info. typed in to the form
3.) Some info hand-written into the form

It is a legal document. Do I need to distinguish those from e/o in some special way? I was planning to just use three different fonts, that are the closest match to the respective writing styles. Advice anyone?

Jennifer Gal
French/Hungarian/English


I normally don't use separate fonts, but annotations in square brackets to indicate which is whiche, like this:

---------
[on letterhead of XYZ corporation:]
SOMETHING SOMETHING

blah blah blah blah blah blahblah blah blahblah blah blahblah blah blahblah blah blahblah blah blahblah blah blahblah blah blahblah blah blah.

[rubber stamp, with words written in longhand:]
APPROVED by John Doe on 5/21/06
[unreadable signature]
-----------

etc.

This is a fairly usual practice in legal translations


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Jennifer Gal  Identity Verified
Hungary
Local time: 18:57
Hungarian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
more on brackets, please May 27, 2006

Ricardo,

Thanks for your input!!!!!

Question: Do you then produce 2 copies of the translation, i.e. one that is "clean" (e.g. no brackets, in-line comments, etc.), and one with the notes you described?

I'm just wondering, because I think it would be difficult to read such a document smoothly, or hard to follow the body of the text with so many bracketed comments inserted (there would be many, many comments of this nature).

Thank you!

Jennifer Gal


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:57
English to Spanish
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Common Sense May 27, 2006

Your solution seems fine, just use commen sense and produce something that can be readily understood with no unnecessary complications. The recipient will surely receive both the original and the translation and will see what has been done.

Just make sure it is a good translation and complete, nothing omitted.


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Riccardo Schiaffino  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:57
Member (2003)
English to Italian
+ ...
more on brackets May 28, 2006

Jennifer Gal wrote:

Question: Do you then produce 2 copies of the translation, i.e. one that is "clean" (e.g. no brackets, in-line comments, etc.), and one with the notes you described?

Jennifer Gal


Hi Jennifer:

No I just produce the one with the brackets, that is one which is both a translation and a description of the original document.

It is true that the bracketed comments may make the text a bit harder to read, so I use them with a pinch of common sense, so, instead of

"blah balh blah [in longhand:] Smith & Co. blah blah blah [in longhand:] agent blah blah blah [in longhand:] May 5 2006 ..."

I do something like

"[typewritten documents with parts filled in longhand:]
blah balh blah Smith & Co. blah blah blah agent blah blah blah May 5 2006 ..."

Also, whenver there is something that for any reason is difficult to read, I do my best to understand what it says, but my description may include things such as [unreadable word] or [unreadable word, perhaps "contract"].

That way, when I add to the translation a certification that "to the best of my knowledge the translation is a faithful representation in Italian of the English document in my hand" (or words to that effect), I can do that in good conscience.

Finally, in case of a signature I normally put [unreadable signature] - even if I think that I may be able to read it. I do this following the advice i received long ago from a wise and very expert italian translator, who warned me that doing otherwise (i.e., "[signature:] John Doe") might sometimes being interpreted as my certifying that the signature in question is indeed that of "John Doe").



[Edited at 2006-05-28 01:34]


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Jennifer Gal  Identity Verified
Hungary
Local time: 18:57
Hungarian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
enriched May 28, 2006

Thanks for the awesome advice, Ricardo. Having spent years in a legal family and the legal profession, I definitely get your drift. I don't know wher you are physically, but if here in U.S., I'm sure you've seen attorney letterheads that say "a professional association, not a partnership" on them. It's the same type of disclaimer as your "signature illegible". It's a "cya" qualifier (cover your ass). Sorry to be crass (I'm really not), but it's the lingo, ya' know?

Thanks again for advice.

Cordially,

Jennifer Gal


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