Mobile menu

Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
Translation of Websites: technicalities
Thread poster: Hans Hereijgers

Hans Hereijgers
Local time: 00:14
Spanish to Dutch
+ ...
Nov 14, 2001

At university I learned how to get the words translated. But what if the words are not delivered to you in WORD-format?

I was asked to import a site in Frontpage in order to adapt the html pages. Problems arose when certain files refused to be imported and when text that were part of certain images needed to translated.

What are your experiences in translating html-pages? What software do you use to edit the text and/or images that contain text?

In other words, are there any tips you can give me regarding the technicalities of website translation?


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Emanuel Bod  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:14
English to Romanian
+ ...
For html pages translation I recommend Trados TagEditor Nov 14, 2001

There are several options for translating html pages. If you are familiar with html, then you can simply use Notepad (included in Windows) to edit each individual page. Or to make your work easier use a html editor which displays the html code in different colors so that it is easier to differentiate the text from the html tags. My favourite is Max\'s HTML Beauty, which is free and you can find it at http://www.max.co.yu/htmlbeauty/



If you are not very familiar with html, you may want to use a WYSIWYG editor like Frontpage, but not necessarily. There are others like Adobe GoLive which do a good job.



If you need an html editor strictly for translating, then I recommend Trados TagEditor which is included in the Trados translation solution. The advantage of TagEditor is that you can use it together with a translation memory. It can also shrink and expand the html tags so that you can better focus on the text of the page. It also protects the html tags from accidental modifications. In brief, TagEditor was designed with the translator in mind and it does make one\'s life easier.



With regard to pictures containing text to be translated the matters are a bit more complicated. You will need to use a good image editor. The obvious choices are Adobe Photoshop and Jasc Paint Shop Pro. When using image editing software you must be careful with your save settings because the translated picture could lose quality and in the end look different from the original.



I hope this helps.



Regards,

Emanuel Bod

Web Wide World Translations



Direct link Reply with quote
 

Clarisa Moraña  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 20:14
Member (2002)
English to Spanish
+ ...
usa un archivo de texto Nov 14, 2001

Tendrías que aprender a utilizar el FrontPage, no es tan difícil. Un documento en Word deberías guardarlo como archivo de texto (.txt) y utilizar éste en tu FrontPage, que luego deberás formatear...

Sería interesante que para estos casos cuentes con una herramienta de traducción asistida que te deja intacto los formateos de página y te muestra sólo el texto a traducir. De todas maneras, muchas imágenes de las páginas Web contienen textos que deben ser traducidos prácticamente a mano, utilizando el mismo software utilizado para hacer dichos dibujos.
[addsig]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Carole Muller
Denmark
Local time: 00:14
English to French
+ ...
Start with Notepad ... Nov 15, 2001

I agree with Emmanuel on his really useful advice. However it may seem like a big mouthful to swallow as a starter, if you don\'t have the kind of experience E. sounds to have. ...to become familiar with HTML, because you will need very little HTML programming knowledge to do your work.



For a quicky, and if you use Explorer, when opening an .htm or .html file (on your PC or surfing the net) try and click up in the menu bar VIEW then select SOURCE. You will see plain HTML with tags and with text. Position the mouse on next and see where you are. That way you can start finding your way round in HTML.



Also, I have had lots of problems with Frontpage, if you can manage ysing otger software such as TRADOS you will be better off. Frontpage is a highly capricious software and does strange things to imported graphics files sometimes, especially if the graphics are .jpg or.bmp or.gifs and not the orginal files from the graphic software used to create them.
[addsig]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Hans Hereijgers
Local time: 00:14
Spanish to Dutch
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks for the advice... but... I need some more ;-) Nov 15, 2001

First of all thank you for your reactions. Very kind indeed.

Now, I do have some knowledge of html, fortunately. (I can create modest websites, using notepad and/or frontpage)

The other day, however, I was asked to translate a website... I don\'t know what the normal procedure is, but I take it that it\'s the translator\'s job to get the html pages off the web, translate all of them (including text in graphics) and put them on the web again. Could you tell this newbie if this is the normal procedure? And if you do have to get it off the web yourself, how do you go about it? Frontpage (only WYSIWYG-editor I know something about) allows you to \'import\' the site... but, in my case, it wouldn\'t import everything. How do you get the site to your hard disk?

As for the images, obviously quite a job to get them right... I understand that the best way to do it is to ask what software was used to make them, and then try and find a rich friend who possesses all that software. Am I right?

Enough questions for now. Thanks for reading me.

Hans



Direct link Reply with quote
 
Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
Local time: 18:14
German to English
+ ...
No, no Nov 15, 2001

It is not your job to glean all those pages (sometimes literally hundreds) off the Internet. Your client (an agency or direct client) must provide you with the html files (if your client is an agency, the agency will have to cull those pages off the Internet). Remember: if they require you to collect all those pages yourself, you will have to charge them for the time.



Be careful: I was approached by a German agency about a year ago for the translation of a website involving at least 20,000 to 30,000 words. Instead of providing me with all the necessary information for a quote, they expected me to go through all those pages and count the words myself (needless to say that I refused, and as it turned out, they just wanted to download that dirty job on to a translator and then use somebody else for the translation). What made me suspicious was the fact that they kept insisting on an exact word count, and not just an estimate (the agency in question, by the way, is well-known on the various mailing lists regarding defaulting agencies!!!)



But before I digress any further, let me say this: it is not your job to collect all those pages off the Internet; it is your client\'s duty to provide you with the files.

[ This Message was edited by: on 2001-11-15 20:20 ]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Gianfranco Zecchino  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:14
German to Italian
+ ...
By the way... Nov 16, 2001

Like Hans, I´m new to the profession (well, I´m still swatting to get my foot in the door...). Apart from taking advantage from the information flowing on this forum, I´m writing to ask Werner whether he can tell me which german mailing-list are devoted, at least partially, to good and bad agencies. I live in Germany and, as a beginner, I´m afraid there are too many agencies ready to exploit people like me...

...it´s a long way to the top (if you wanna rock´n´roll?!)


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
Local time: 18:14
German to English
+ ...
Mailing list Nov 16, 2001

Please see my new entry under \"15 rules for dealing with agencies\".



I know there are some German mailing lists, but I suggest you start with TCR (Yahoo Groups) first: groups.yahoo.com/group/TCR


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Sabina Norderhaug
English to Russian
+ ...
my 2c... Nov 26, 2001

Quote:


On 2001-11-15 16:13, Hans Hereijgers wrote:

I don\'t know what the normal procedure is, but I take it that it\'s the translator\'s job to get the html pages off the web, translate all of them (including text in graphics) and put them on the web again. Could you tell this newbie if this is the normal procedure? And if you do have to get it off the web yourself, how do you go about it?




Hi Hans,



I\'d like to share some of my experience hoping that it might help you. First of all I\'m using Web editor called DreamWeaver. I believe it\'s more powerful than FrontPage and gives more functionality. It\'s not very easy to learn but exceeds all your expectation after you get familiar with it.



Regardless of what Web editor you are using, there is an option to open any webpage just by typing URL. It\'s very easy, like working with files in any graphic editor. Once you open the page you can save a copy on your local machine, your PC. Then you can start working on your translation and everyone does it his own way. As for myself, I prefer translate big text chunks separately in the text editor and then copy/paste it, then adjust and keep working on graphics translation separately. Sometimes, I\'d just type translation word-by-word right into the copy. As for words count, here word editor also comes in handy. You can find all the statistics in File Properties-> Statistics. It\'s more complicated with the text in graphics, of course.



When translation is done all I have to do is to send it to a customer. Then it\'s his business to find a place for it on his web server. Unless if you want to learn some FTP basics and upload the file yourself. Other tools and Internet protocols can be used as well. Sometimes it may save time depending on how fast is your Internet connection.



Good luck,

Sabina


Direct link Reply with quote
 
deireland
Local time: 23:14
Spanish to English
+ ...
May 17, 2002

Quote:


On 2001-11-15 16:13, Hans Hereijgers wrote:



The other day, however, I was asked to translate a website... I don\'t know what the normal procedure is, but I take it that it\'s the translator\'s job to get the html pages off the web, translate all of them (including text in graphics) and put them on the web again. Could you tell this newbie if this is the normal procedure? And if you do have to get it off the web yourself, how do you go about it? Frontpage (only WYSIWYG-editor I know something about) allows you to \'import\' the site... but, in my case, it wouldn\'t import everything. How do you get the site to your hard disk?

As for the images, obviously quite a job to get them right... I understand that the best way to do it is to ask what software was used to make them, and then try and find a rich friend who possesses all that software. Am I right?

Enough questions for now. Thanks for reading me.

Hans







Here\'s how I download pages from the web:

1. Save the homepage

2. Highlight a link, right mouse click over it and choose Save Target As

3. Repeat the process for each link on the home page.

OR, if there is a site map - save all of the links as above.

5. Go back to start and save the images for each page.

(Right click on the images in the original to see where they are stored and when you save them, make sure you save them in the correct directory - usually named \'images\' and a sub-directory of the main folder.)



To edit text efficiently I use EditPad - an excellent text editor that allows you to find and replace texts on multiple pages at the same time.



Finally, forget about Frontpage - a nasty editor that will corrupt clean html. Dreamweaver is the best of breed. However, if you want to limit yourself to translation (and I suggest that you should), using EditPad will keep the html intact.



Major word of advice: Do not get involved in image editing - preserve the original html and the links to the images will remain intact.



Another warning: Internet Explorer has a Save As feature that allows you to save a \'complete web page\'. If you go down this route for handiness you lose the original directory structure.



As for uploading the finished product to the web - definitely not your job.



Finally, the client has all of the web pages on a machine - in the correct folders. All they have to do is ZIP it and send it to you/the agency. If they do not do this they do not know what they are at.. Expect pain.





Direct link Reply with quote
 
Alex Potts
English to Spanish
+ ...
Website wordcounting May 25, 2002

Quote:


On 2001-11-15 20:19, AbacusTrans wrote:



Instead of providing me with all the necessary information for a quote, they expected me to go through all those pages and count the words myself (needless to say that I refused, and as it turned out, they just wanted to download that dirty job on to a translator and then use somebody else for the translation). What made me suspicious was the fact that they kept insisting on an exact word count, and not just an estimate





There is at least one program for counting website words, I haven\'t used it myself so can\'t actually recommend it; check out www.webbudget.com

Direct link Reply with quote
 

sylvie malich
Germany
Local time: 00:14
German to English
Thanx, Alex Potts May 31, 2002




There is at least one program for counting website words, I haven\'t used it myself so can\'t actually recommend it; check out www.webbudget.com

[/quote]



thanx, alex,

I went straight to this link and downloaded \"webbudget\". Up until now I\'ve been charging by the hour or having my client paste text into a word document. This could be the alternative. Haven\'t unzipped it yet, but it looks promising.


[addsig]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

José Cavalcante  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 21:14
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Helium Jun 5, 2002

I translated some files with Microsoft Helium and it worked nicely. It creates a memory translation and the tags are colored so that you can go straight to the translatable text. I don\'t know if they sell it or have a shareware version, but I suggest you to do a search.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

tongue tied
Local time: 23:14
English
Editing Images Jun 6, 2002

Editing text in images is not like editing text in Word, for example. Web graphics (.jpg and .gif) are bitmaps and do not store text/font information that can be editied. To change text in a bitmap involves obscuring the old text then inserting new - messy and can look unproffessional. A good analagy would be to ask Rolf Harris to change the Mona Lisa\'s hair to blonde.



Most websites now have professionally made graphics/buttons that were created by graphic designers. These people work with programs that use vector or outline files then export to bitmap (.jpg & .gif) for the web and these programs allow the editing of text.



What I usually do (as an agency) is request any text in graphics to be translated in a 2 column file (english on left - target language on right) then send that file to the client or their graphic designers for them to paste into the vector/outline files.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Sonia Garrett
Portuguese to English
FreeBsd Jul 30, 2002

Thank you all but...

How\'s that gonna help me with FreeBsd?



Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Translation of Websites: technicalities

Advanced search


Translation news





SDL Trados Studio 2017 Freelance
The leading translation software used by over 250,000 translators.

SDL Trados Studio 2017 helps translators increase translation productivity whilst ensuring quality. Combining translation memory, terminology management and machine translation in one simple and easy-to-use environment.

More info »
Across v6.3
Translation Toolkit and Sales Potential under One Roof

Apart from features that enable you to translate more efficiently, the new Across Translator Edition v6.3 comprises your crossMarket membership. The new online network for Across users assists you in exploring new sales potential and generating revenue.

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs