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révision / proof-reading / copywriting
Thread poster: Heidi Fayolle

Heidi Fayolle  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 03:39
French to German
Jan 30, 2007

Quelle différence exacte entre ces trois services? Merci

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ViktoriaG  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 21:39
English to French
+ ...
An article Jan 30, 2007

Here is an article I wrote to help freelancers (and, in most cases, outsourcers) understand the difference between editing and proofreading. It will help you see the difference between the two and also give you some tips and tricks on how to deal with these.

http://www.proz.com/translation-articles/articles/543/

Copywriting simply means writing a text based on what the client requires. It is very broad - you can copywrite magazine articles, user's manuals, advertisement texts, etc. From a translator's point of view, a copywriter is the person who produces the source text. Usually, this is paid by the text. It is very seldom paid by the word. It is up to the copywriter to evaluate how much time it will take them to produce a text, and they charge accordingly.

All the best!


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William [Bill] Gray  Identity Verified
Norway
Local time: 03:39
Member (2006)
English
+ ...
Thank you, Viktoria ... Jan 30, 2007

Viktoria Gimbe wrote:

Here is an article I wrote ....
http://www.proz.com/translation-articles/articles/543/



Most helpful. Thanks a lot!

Bill


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Jackie Bowman

Local time: 22:39
Spanish to English
+ ...
Proofing, editing, writing, all that ... Jan 30, 2007

1. Revision means taking a text that has already been translated, and converting it into something that is a completely faithful reflection of the original, while still being something that a native speaker of the target language can read without getting a migraine.

In my experience, and given the general standard of freelance translation from Spanish to English in my field, revision is indispensable.

My own experience is that about 90 percent, possibly 95 percent, of freelance Spa-Eng translators in my field are unable to produce a translation that could be published as it stands. All good translators are excellent revisers and editors of any text that they translate themselves.

2. Proofreading is the last stage of textual review. At this point, the proofreader is looking solely for typographical errors, missing footnotes, redundant line breaks, and so forth. The proofreader is not an editor or reviser. The proofreader is looking solely for things that the editor/reviser missed. It is not the proofreader’s job to correct abominable style. That’s the reviser’s job.

3. Copywriting is simply writing. It has nothing to do with translation. If you write ‘Buy Wizzo Detergent: It’s Really Great’ for an advertising agency, then you’re a copywriter. Literally, you write copy. You write stuff that will be printed or broadcast. The vast majority of the copywriters I’ve ever known are monolingual. By ‘copywriter’, you might have meant ‘copyeditor’.

4. All translated texts need a proofreader if the text is to be published. In my experience, in my field, only a small minority of translators can write so well in their target language that they don’t need a reviser.

5. If your translation consists of translating 'ouch!' from a US computer game into its Japanese equivalent, then none of the above applies.


[Edited at 2007-01-30 23:14]


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Spencer Allman
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:39
Finnish to English
Overlap Jan 31, 2007

I would say there is some overlap between revision and proof-reading. For example, someone revising a translation would correct obvious typos, although this latter normally comes under the heading of proof-reading.

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Heidi Fayolle  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 03:39
French to German
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you Jackie Jan 31, 2007

Jackie Bowman wrote:

1. Revision means taking a text that has already been translated, and converting it into something that is a completely faithful reflection of the original, while still being something that a native speaker of the target language can read without getting a migraine.

In my experience, and given the general standard of freelance translation from Spanish to English in my field, revision is indispensable.

My own experience is that about 90 percent, possibly 95 percent, of freelance Spa-Eng translators in my field are unable to produce a translation that could be published as it stands. All good translators are excellent revisers and editors of any text that they translate themselves.

2. Proofreading is the last stage of textual review. At this point, the proofreader is looking solely for typographical errors, missing footnotes, redundant line breaks, and so forth. The proofreader is not an editor or reviser. The proofreader is looking solely for things that the editor/reviser missed. It is not the proofreader’s job to correct abominable style. That’s the reviser’s job.

3. Copywriting is simply writing. It has nothing to do with translation. If you write ‘Buy Wizzo Detergent: It’s Really Great’ for an advertising agency, then you’re a copywriter. Literally, you write copy. You write stuff that will be printed or broadcast. The vast majority of the copywriters I’ve ever known are monolingual. By ‘copywriter’, you might have meant ‘copyeditor’.

4. All translated texts need a proofreader if the text is to be published. In my experience, in my field, only a small minority of translators can write so well in their target language that they don’t need a reviser.

5. If your translation consists of translating 'ouch!' from a US computer game into its Japanese equivalent, then none of the above applies.


[Edited at 2007-01-30 23:14]


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