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Thread poster: Julian Wood

Julian Wood  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:34
Czech to English
+ ...
Apr 2, 2007

Hi-sorry if this has already been posted MANY times (I'd also appreciate tips on finding similar posts), but I'm unsure which languages to post as my combinations.
Is it best just to post German and Czech (from which I can confidently translate in all respects), or also include Russian (bit rusty, but still strong in it) and/or French (still confident in it, but got 'told off' recently for translating from it by another translator- not here- because I asked one grammar-related question, which I found quite unfair)
Thanks


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Vito Smolej
Germany
Local time: 05:34
Member (2004)
English to Slovenian
+ ...
My experience... Apr 2, 2007

I have the Slovenian-Finnish combination turned on (... and I can even deliver...), but it makes no difference.

I have as yet to figure it out, where it this kind of information starts to make a difference. My feel is, that it's very much the buyer's ("who needs it?") market. I may get an order some time for this "interesting" combination down the road, but I don't feel I'll make my living with it.

In your case, Id stick to czech-english and look in the czech-german direction - if it fits your background of course.

Regards, nazdar and all the best


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Charlie Bavington  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:34
French to English
Jack of all trades....? Apr 2, 2007

... and you know the rest

Mind you, variety is the spice of life, which is fine if you can handle it.
Plenty of people restrict themselves to a single pair, in a single direction, with specialist fields, and still turn work down regularly. Especially in major languages such as German. Generally speaking (and I know the forum search function here is pants), the advice is to specialise and get to be really good at a few things, rather than reasonable at loads.

With specific reference to the recent criticism you received elsewhere in interwebland, my opinion is that those questions (i.e. the ones checking about "ils" and "son") are probably not of the level that one would, by and large, expect a professional translator working in that pair to be asking. If you're not a professional Fr-Eng translator, and were just doing the job as a favour for a mate, fair enough.


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Gerard de Noord  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 05:34
Member (2003)
German to Dutch
+ ...
List them all, but in the right order Apr 2, 2007

Hi Julian,

I guess you're talking about your listing on Proz. I would list all my languages but would make sure they're in the right order. I often use the Proz Freelancers directory search function to create an e-mail link for clients I can't help and I always change the default Language pair emphasis to Among top 3 pairs.

Regards,
Gerard


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xxxLia Fail  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 05:34
Spanish to English
+ ...
list all....but don't accept all jobs Apr 2, 2007

Julian Wood wrote:

Hi-sorry if this has already been posted MANY times (I'd also appreciate tips on finding similar posts), but I'm unsure which languages to post as my combinations.
Is it best just to post German and Czech (from which I can confidently translate in all respects), or also include Russian (bit rusty, but still strong in it) and/or French (still confident in it, but got 'told off' recently for translating from it by another translator- not here- because I asked one grammar-related question, which I found quite unfair)
Thanks


As someone else pointed out, list them all, but in the right order - from strongest to weakest.

However, when it comes to accepting jobs in your 'weaker' pairs, be very discerning, and make sure you don't take on anything above your head. Sometimes your knowledge of a field is as important as your knowledge of a language. I have done so much editing of one particular restricted field in teh last few months that I could probably translate original material from a language I studied in depth for many years but which has lapsed becuase I no longer live/work in it. Also, by now I largely reject work in another language, mostly becuase I'm gradually losing touch with the language and culture becuase I no longer live there. Yet I do jobs from this language if it's my field of specialisation.

You will find, as time goes by, that certain pairs - especially the better ones or teh ones you 'live'/'work' in - will get better, and you will naturally drop the ones that are simply too much work for you OR taht you feel less confident with. That's part of specialising - you become so familiar with a source language that your level of confidence in decoding it gets to be extremely high. That's what makes you a pro translator - as also specialisation in specific knowledge fields.





[Edited at 2007-04-03 00:27]


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Julian Wood  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:34
Czech to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks Apr 3, 2007

Hi- thanks for the posts, I will re-instate Russian, but down the bottom of my list.
Goes to show pieces of paper (a first-class degree in it) are less important than confidence and experience (my Czech, for example)


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Orla Ryan  Identity Verified
Ireland
Local time: 04:34
be honest about your fluency levels Apr 3, 2007

Julian Wood wrote:

Hi- thanks for the posts, I will re-instate Russian, but down the bottom of my list.
Goes to show pieces of paper (a first-class degree in it) are less important than confidence and experience (my Czech, for example)


I have an honours degree in French and German translation but I decided to drop French>English as a language pair two years ago.

I've never lived in a Francophone country, I let my French get very rusty and there is no way I would even contemplate translating FR>EN now. Anyway, there are thousands of FR>EN translators out there, so it hardly made a difference. I can still communicate in French, but I won't translate from it.

Mind you, I was cajoled into doing my first German to Gaelic translation yesterday. (It was only one line) I'm not going to add that combination to my profile any time soon though!!

Orla


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Daina Jauntirans  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:34
Member (2005)
German to English
+ ...
List several, but be careful about the work you accept Apr 3, 2007

I list German>English and Latvian>English. My situation with German is as Charlie says: "Plenty of people restrict themselves to a single pair, in a single direction, with specialist fields, and still turn work down regularly."

But I keep Latvian on there because I grew up with the language, and if something interesting and more general came along, I'd like to have the opportunity to take it. However, when I get contacted about Latvian medical reports or something, I recommend another translator.

I think you're OK keeping your weaker combos on your profile as long as you're clear about what jobs you're willing and able to do in that combination.


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Xiedong Lei
China
Local time: 12:34
English to Chinese
+ ...
My experience: Apr 7, 2007

Lia Fail wrote:

...

I have done so much editing of one particular restricted field in teh last few months that I could probably translate original material from a language I studied in depth for many years but which has lapsed becuase I no longer live/work in it. Also, by now I largely reject work in another language, mostly becuase I'm gradually losing touch with the language and culture becuase I no longer live there. Yet I do jobs from this language if it's my field of specialisation.

...

That's what makes you a pro translator - as also specialisation in specific knowledge fields.



[Edited at 2007-04-03 00:27]



I am highly specilized -- just working on medical materials, and mostly on into Chinese direction. Even though, I still rejected a lof of projets out of my expertise. Sometimes I also accepted some into English projects, by these were collaborated with native speakers who were feeling difficult in fully understanding the source Chinese text--this kind of teamwork is definitely great! Since all of us may have blind spots in our knowledge or experience.


[Edited at 2007-04-07 05:52]


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Julian Wood  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:34
Czech to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
All makes sense Apr 8, 2007

Hi
Thanks for all the posts, it all makes sense- sticking to what one feels comfortable with at a given time- these things are only a snapshot of where you are at a given time


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