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What to do when a govt. agency changes its name and your document dates back to before that change?
Thread poster: Andrea Riffo

Andrea Riffo  Identity Verified
Chile
Local time: 14:31
English to Spanish
Apr 11, 2007

More specifically: I have a document that cites XXXX study submitted to the EMEA in 1999. The problem is, back then, EMEA had one name (and one translation in Spanish) and currently -since 2004, according to Navarro- it has a different one, albeit very similar to the former.

Which one should I use? The name it had back in 1999, since that was when the study was submitted and accepted, or the name it has now, given that the former does not exist any more?


All suggestions welcome

[Edited at 2007-04-11 02:50]


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Mulyadi Subali  Identity Verified
Indonesia
Local time: 00:31
English to Indonesian
+ ...
former one Apr 11, 2007

if you know the old name, that would mean the change took place not too long ago. as generalization, then most people/readers will know it too.

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Fan Gao
Australia
Local time: 04:31
Member (2006)
English to Chinese
+ ...
Couple of suggestions Apr 11, 2007

Hi Andrea,

Maybe you could use the name it's called now and add a footnote to cover all instances where the name appears or maybe you could just call it by its new name and then put in brackets (previously known as......). You could do that at the end by using "find and replace" to save you typing the whole thing over and over.

Best wishes,
Mark


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:31
English to Spanish
+ ...
The Old One Apr 11, 2007

If I understand correctly, the old name would be the one appearing in the document, so in order to be faithful to it, you should use the old name.

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Henrik Pipoyan  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:31
Member (2004)
English to Armenian
Ask the client Apr 11, 2007

You could use both old and new names, or do as Chinese Concept suggests. In each case you can explain the client your decision if any problem arises, and in each case you’ll be right. But I think the best thing to do is to explain the client this situation and ask them how they want you to translate it. This way you won’t have a feeling of having dome something wrong and you won’t need to explain your decision if any problem arises.

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Steffen Walter  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 18:31
Member (2002)
English to German
+ ...
Combine Henry's and Henrik's advice Apr 11, 2007

Hi Andrea,

I'd use the old name (and/or its equivalent in the target language, if applicable) in the translation, add a translator's note in brackets or as a footnote pointing out that the name has changed ("now {name of agency}") and, in addition, inform the client accordingly in your email communication when you send off the translation in order to make sure they get the message.

Steffen

[Edited at 2007-04-11 09:04]


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Maxi Inge
Local time: 12:31
German to English
+ ...
Discuss with client Apr 11, 2007

Similar to what Henrik suggests, I always go back to the client in cases like this, and explain what I've found. I'll often suggest various alternatives and ask whether they have a preference both in which name is used, and how they would like it handled (just one particular name, mention of both names, in footnote, brackets, other?). In the case of an agency, the agency often goes back to the client who more often than not has a definite preference.

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MMUlr  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 18:31
English to German
+ ...
This would be my solution, too! :-) Apr 11, 2007

Steffen Walter wrote:

Hi Andrea,

I'd use the old name (and/or its equivalent in the target language, if applicable) in the translation, add a translator's note in brackets or as a footnote pointing out that the name has changed ("now {name of agency}") and, in addition, inform the client accordingly in your email communication when you send off the translation in order to make sure they get the message.

Steffen

[Edited at 2007-04-11 09:04]


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Andrea Riffo  Identity Verified
Chile
Local time: 14:31
English to Spanish
TOPIC STARTER
thanks! Apr 13, 2007

Thanks everyone for your replies!!

I asked the client and he said to use the former name and add the current name in [ ].




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ViktoriaG  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 12:31
English to French
+ ...
New name with the mention (formerly XYZ) Apr 17, 2007

I would use the new name. The person who reads your text reads it now, and right now, the name of the organization is the new name. I would then add the old name between brackets, with the mention "formerly".

Thus: XYZ (formerly ABC)

All the best!


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