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Have any idea on reading or pronouncing foreign names?
Thread poster: organizer
organizer
South Korea
Local time: 19:11
English to Korean
+ ...
Dec 25, 2002

As a novice in translation field, I often found that some strange(.. or odd at least for me!) names in English or any other western languages/characters.



How you all westerners do read it out? Does not have to read it at all?



When, in sometimes, I need to transliterate it into Korean, it is really to hard.



Anybody have a good idea on this matter?



TIA.



[testline]


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Claudia Iglesias  Identity Verified
Chile
Local time: 06:41
Member (2002)
Spanish to French
+ ...
One idea Dec 25, 2002

Hello testline



In KudoZ, when you select \"answer to the question\", you have the possibility \"upload audio\" and instructions to upload audio files. It\'s really easy, you just need a microphone and the file must not be to large. A poem, for instance is too large. A sentence or a word is O.K.



So if you need some particular words I\'d advice you to ask them in Kudoz explaining that you need them in audio files.



Good luck.


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Arnaud HERVE  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 12:41
English to French
+ ...
phonetic Dec 25, 2002

Use a dictionary with phonetic alphabet.



Good luck.


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Aliseo Japan  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 19:41
Member
Italian to Japanese
+ ...
Same as Japanese Dec 26, 2002

Hello,

I am translating from and into Japanese and, as you most probably know, when dealing with foreign words Katakana is used. Although sometimes it can be useful particularly when doing technical translation, I can assure you that it is very hard to transliterate foreign names using Katakana, not just because Katakana does not use some phonetical combinations so typical of western languages (take German, for example), but particularly because the Japanese reader often is not able to understand from what language a certain word comes. And, as a consequence, given the transliterated word it is often very hard to guess how to re-transliterate it into the original language. It is even more difficult for foreigner readers of Japanese texts, although this is of no concern to the Japanese.



As a translator, I always strive to let customer understand that foreign words should be left in the original form (Roman characters) and, if really deemed necessary and wherever the type of translation allows it, adding the local pronunciation (with Katakana characters in case of Japanese) within brackets to show the pronunciation. Doing this way perhaps people will steadly get more used to foreign words and even understand what foreign language they come from.



Mario Cerutti


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Arthur Borges
China
Local time: 18:41
English
+ ...
I think the BBC have a pronunciation dictionary Dec 26, 2002

...but can\'t access their website to track it down for you.



Then you have other tough choices, e.g. the Polish labour leader and president Walesa is pronounced \"Valessa\" in English but something like \"Vowentsa\" (or is it Vowesha?) in Polish. So which pronunciation do you want to base your Korean transliteration on?


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Nikolai Muraviev  Identity Verified
Russian Federation
Local time: 13:41
English to Russian
+ ...
Ask native speakers! Dec 26, 2002

Use KudoZ for this purpose. Btw, if you\'re interested in Russian names, you welcome!



Nikolay (Nick) Muraviev, RUSSIA


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Harry Bornemann  Identity Verified
Mexico
English to German
+ ...
it depends... Dec 26, 2002

In the online dictionary of Merriam Webster at

http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary

you can hear the pronounciation of most words.



But you can never be quite sure: I have had a native american english professor, who admitted, that he did not know how to pronounce some british english names without any englishman telling him, because the pronounciation was against all rules...



And sometimes you should not even try to pronounce it correctly in a translated text (for example, if it contains sounds, which most people could not pronounce correctly, anyway).



Example:

Dae Woo made a big mistake, when they tried to teach german customers how to pronounce its name correctly. (I think, that a french marketing agency would have never made such a mistake.)







[ This Message was edited by:on2002-12-26 12:49]


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organizer
South Korea
Local time: 19:11
English to Korean
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
In Korean, "Walesa" sounds like "Vah-wehn-sah." Dec 26, 2002

Since Korean is a syllable-wise language, much like Japanese or slightly like Chinese, Walesa also sounds much like one after one syllable format. [We generally do not speak Walesa(.. wall-lih-sa..?) as in English. One by one, punctually speaking! [I believe you can understand what I am saying.]



Generally English does make some other/foreign names into its OWN codes.. My question is that. Your answer is truly RIGHT what I saught! I do not want to parse through English. I want to know their ORIGINAL pronunciation!



Thanks a lot.



Quote:


On 2002-12-26 03:40, Arthur wrote:

...but can\'t access their website to track it down for you.



Then you have other tough choices, e.g. the Polish labour leader and president Walesa is pronounced \"Valessa\" in English but something like \"Vowentsa\" (or is it Vowesha?) in Polish. So which pronunciation do you want to base your Korean transliteration on?



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Csaba Ban  Identity Verified
Hungary
Local time: 12:41
Member (2002)
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Walesa Dec 26, 2002

Actually, most of the languages that use a Latin-based alphabet have many sounds that do not exist in English, Inmany cases, such sounds are denoted by certain diacritical marks (hooks, dots, etc.).

In this specific case, in the original Polish word, the \"l\" is crossed with a little bar and there a small crooked hook under the \"e\". The outcome is that the correct pronunciation of the name is actually something like \"va-wehn-sa\". Correct, i.e. Polish pronunciation.



I would think it is only too logical that the basis of transliteration into non-Latin based scripts should be the original (native) pronunciation of any name.


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organizer
South Korea
Local time: 19:11
English to Korean
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Japanese is too notorious to expresss foreign names, you know! Dec 27, 2002

Hello Cerutti,



As Korea and Japan is very near, I have some knowledge on Japanese. Their Katakana system does not fully support foreign names!



Sometimes transliterate/translate Japanese Katakana into Korean or its original source language, I had a tough time to solve what that word(s) meaning. Bad memories.



Anyway, Korean is not so much closed language, however, in general, we also add in brackets their original characters or pronunciation to clarify misunderstanding of original language. [Some old tradition from the times of colony under Japanese rule. Second bad memory..]



Anyhow, your reply does remind me of Japanese (which lacking of versatility).



Quote:


On 2002-12-26 01:20, aliseo wrote:

Hello,

I am translating from and into Japanese and, as you most probably know, when dealing with foreign words Katakana is used. Although sometimes it can be useful particularly when doing technical translation, I can assure you that it is very hard to transliterate foreign names using Katakana, not just because Katakana does not use some phonetical combinations so typical of western languages (take German, for example), but particularly because the Japanese reader often is not able to understand from what language a certain word comes. And, as a consequence, given the transliterated word it is often very hard to guess how to re-transliterate it into the original language. It is even more difficult for foreigner readers of Japanese texts, although this is of no concern to the Japanese.



As a translator, I always strive to let customer understand that foreign words should be left in the original form (Roman characters) and, if really deemed necessary and wherever the type of translation allows it, adding the local pronunciation (with Katakana characters in case of Japanese) within brackets to show the pronunciation. Doing this way perhaps people will steadly get more used to foreign words and even understand what foreign language they come from.



Mario Cerutti



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organizer
South Korea
Local time: 19:11
English to Korean
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Russian is TOO difficult to master..^^ Dec 28, 2002

I do not know any Russian alphabet[Cyrillic alphabet..], I bought Russian-Korean dictionary.



The result: letter by letter reading which needs a great effort to read Russian names/words.



Ex: Muraviev = muh-rah-fie-eh-f.



That\'s all.



Anyway I thanks you of your offer.



Quote:


On 2002-12-26 09:45, Nick_Mur wrote:

Use KudoZ for this purpose. Btw, if you\'re interested in Russian names, you welcome!



Nikolay (Nick) Muraviev, RUSSIA



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organizer
South Korea
Local time: 19:11
English to Korean
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Today(2003/JAN/19) I found one source.. Jan 19, 2003

Thanks all! Anyway I found one more guide book from certain \"Introductory Book on Professional Translations\" published in Korea.





The source is:





DUDEN 6, \"Das Aussprache worterbuch\" from \"Dudenverlag.\"





I am not good at German, however, I think the dicitionary will be good for me.





On other day, I should buy that book!





Again, thanks for all of the help.




I really appreciate all of you.

[ This Message was edited by: testline on 2003-04-17 19:31]


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