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What English font do you use?
Thread poster: jojikiba
jojikiba
Local time: 23:08
Japanese to English
Jan 31, 2008

Hi All,

If you translate into English, what font do you use and why? Is there any reason for choosing, say, Times New Roman over Arial? Is it just a matter of preference?

Many thanks


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chord0
United States
English to Spanish
+ ...
font usage Jan 31, 2008

hello

I have done freelancing translation from english to spanish for magazines and websites here in the usa, and the preferred font is Times new Roman, 12 pt which at that size is quite difficult to read. Yet this is what their editors normally require, I do not know why?

I wonder what an editor would answer.
good luck
georgina


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Juan Jacob  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 08:08
French to Spanish
+ ...
Into English... from what? Jan 31, 2008

Interesting.
I assume you're talking about Japanese into English.
As I/we dont' know about Japanese fonts, I/we can't tell.
I always respect source font. In fact, "format" is not our problem, by the way.


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Nizamettin Yigit  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 15:08
Dutch to Turkish
+ ...
I follow the source text Jan 31, 2008

Hi,
I use the source text's font. But when I have to pick my own, I usually use Verdana.

I like it!

Regards,
Nizam


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RichardDeegan
Local time: 09:08
Spanish to English
If it's my choice... Jan 31, 2008

If it's my choice, I go with Arial 11, much easier on the eyes, and similar to the Verdana above.
I've progressed successively through a lot of favorites from the old PFS /Multimate limited-choice days 'til now, always looking for the clearest, easiest to read.


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jojikiba
Local time: 23:08
Japanese to English
TOPIC STARTER
Quite a lot of replies... Jan 31, 2008

Thank you for all the replies my question has generated.

In my case, I work from Japanese to English, so using the source font (which is usually called MS Mincho) looks amateurish and not good in English. So I usually switch to Times New Roman.

Regardless of the language you are translating from, my question was about what font you use when writing. For example, I wondered if there were any style guides that recommended a particular font to use. Sometimes (as in my case) using the source font is not really an option.

And then Juan Jacob's comment that formatting is not a translators problem was interesting. Strictly speaking that is true. But you want your work to look good don't you?


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Niraja Nanjundan  Identity Verified
Local time: 19:38
German to English
Previous poll discussion may be useful Jan 31, 2008

Hi,

You may also find a previous poll discussion on fonts useful and interesting:

"What font do you use when translating scanned documents/non-standard formats?"

http://www.proz.com/topic/87985

Regards,
Niraja


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Steven Capsuto  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:08
Spanish to English
+ ...
Arial for large headlines; Times New Roman for the body of the document Jan 31, 2008

At least that's what I tend to use for paper documents.

When designing websites, I usually use Verdana throughout the site (with Arial as the secondary choice for computers that don't have Verdana).


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Jocelyne S  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 15:08
Member
French to English
+ ...
Times New Roman, 12 pt Jan 31, 2008

Like others, when translating I generally keep the original font (my source language is French so this is easy to do).

When writing (as opposed to translating), I use Times New Roman, 12 point. As a university student several professors required us to submit essays in this font and I guess the habit just stuck. They argued that it was easiest to read. I have never had complaints from editors about this font either.

Best,
Jocelyne


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Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 14:08
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
Likewise Jan 31, 2008

Nizamettin Yigit wrote:


Hi,
I use the source text's font. But when I have to pick my own, I usually use Verdana.

I like it!

Regards,
Nizam

Like you, Nizam, I follow the source text's font when possible. If it's left to me, I pefer Garamond.
However, I have one good client who insists on Times New Roman 12 pt, unjustified, for all texts (but also says "follow the style of the source file", the two requirements not always being compatible).
It is, of course, easy enough for the recipient of the translation to change the font if he/she wishes.
And yes, of course I want my work to be pleasing to the eye, and I take pleasure in making it so, especially when the stuff is really mind-numbing, such as sets of annual accounts.
Regards
Jenny


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tonymacg  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:08
Member (2006)
Japanese to English
+ ...
Book Antiqua Feb 1, 2008

I used to use Garamond, too, but I got tired of it, and settled on 12 point Book Antiqua. I think it looks nicer than tired old Times New Roman.

An editor friend said that she found unseriffed fonts like Arial tiringg to read after a while.


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Derek Gill Franßen  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 15:08
German to English
+ ...
Favorite Fonts Feb 1, 2008

I, of course, match the fonts used in the original document.

Whenever I can, however, I like to use the Whitman family of fonts, which I originally purchased to use in my own letterhead (cf. http://www.fontbureau.com/fonts/Whitman ).

Kent Law, the designer of the font, paid particular attention to what some consider minor orthographic details, but what I consider to be of utmost importance, such as the relative lengths of the dashes.

It is a beautiful font, and I have never regretted spending the money to obtain it.

[Edited at 2008-02-01 14:37]


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Derek Gill Franßen  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 15:08
German to English
+ ...
Favorite Fonts Feb 1, 2008

I, of course, match the fonts used in the original document.

Whenever I can, however, I like to use the Whitman family of fonts, which I originally purchased to use in my own letterhead (cf. http://www.fontbureau.com/fonts/Whitman ).

Kent Law, the designer of the font, paid particular attention to what some consider minor orthographic details, but what I consider to be of utmost importance, such as the relative sizes of certain punctuation marks.

It is a beautiful font, and I have never regretted spending the money to obtain it.


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Elda CENALIA
United States
Local time: 10:08
Member
Albanian to English
+ ...
Garamond Feb 3, 2008

12.

Always except when specific one is required!



[Edited at 2008-02-03 17:02]


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