Mobile menu

Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
"New" financial words/phrases
Thread poster: Nicolette Scholte
Nicolette Scholte  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:09
English to Dutch
+ ...
Oct 1, 2008

An article in the Irish Times today about "new" phrases that are used about the current financial situation.
Some terms are extremely Irish, but others are more general.
I personally thought it was fun to read and I learned much from it.

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/features/2008/0930/1222680558798.html?digest=1


Direct link Reply with quote
 
roxana68
Italy
Local time: 16:09
Italian to English
+ ...
Useful Oct 1, 2008

Hi,
I found the article very useful, I'll keep it on memory in case I'll be in need!
Thanks,
Roxanne


Direct link Reply with quote
 

avantix  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 16:09
German to Dutch
+ ...
Interesting... Oct 1, 2008

...although some mentioned terms (e.g. short-selling; bear market) are not really new ones.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:09
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
Three sheets to the wind Oct 1, 2008

I doubt their explanation for this: it's usually "Three sheets in the wind", which means drunk, and comes from the days of sailing ships. http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-thr1.htm

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Daina Jauntirans  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:09
German to English
+ ...
Good one Oct 1, 2008

In the US at least, "negative equity" is also popularly called "being upside down," as in "He's upside down on that house/car/boat."

Does anyone know what "moral hazard" is called in German? Or have a link to a similar article in German?

Thanks for posting!

[Edited at 2008-10-01 12:03]

[Edited at 2008-10-01 12:04]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Angelica Kjellström  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 16:09
Member (2006)
German to Swedish
+ ...
Good resource, thanks! Oct 1, 2008

I find this article very intersting and it will surely be useful in my financial translations.

Kind regards,

Angelica


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxLia Fail  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 16:09
Spanish to English
+ ...
Cowenomics is the only "Irish" one:-) Oct 1, 2008

Nicolette Scholte wrote:

An article in the Irish Times today about "new" phrases that are used about the current financial situation.
Some terms are extremely Irish, but others are more general.
I personally thought it was fun to read and I learned much from it.

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/features/2008/0930/1222680558798.html?digest=1


Cowenomics is a reference to an Irish minister.

However, all the others are standard GB and/or US terms.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Daina Jauntirans  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:09
German to English
+ ...
Another good one Oct 1, 2008

I heard another good term on the news tonight: TED spread.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TED_spread


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Nicolette Scholte  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:09
English to Dutch
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Or Temple Bar Oct 2, 2008

Lia Fail wrote:




Cowenomics is a reference to an Irish minister.

However, all the others are standard GB and/or US terms.

[/quote]

True, but also Temple Bar, I'm not entirely sure how many people from outside Ireland that never been there know what it is.

"Stagflation

Sounds like a ruckus in Temple Bar with a group of men from Manchester..."

But only based on the terms, then yes Cowenomics is a definite Irish term


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Daina Jauntirans  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:09
German to English
+ ...
Another one - not new, but appropriate Oct 2, 2008

Texas ratio - the ratio of a bank's troubled loans to its capital

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/08_41/b4103028907635.htm


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxhazmatgerman
Local time: 16:09
English to German
@Daina Jauntirans Oct 2, 2008

Would "being upside down" be the equivalent of "going belly up" which I've only known so far as meaning "bust". Regards, and thanks to Scholte for link.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Daina Jauntirans  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:09
German to English
+ ...
Nope Oct 2, 2008

hazmatgerman wrote:

Would "being upside down" be the equivalent of "going belly up" which I've only known so far as meaning "bust". Regards, and thanks to Scholte for link.


Hi Hazmatgerman,

No, when a company goes belly up, it files for bankruptcy. When an individual is "upside down" on something (usually a house or car), that means that they owe more than the asset is worth. This is probably unimaginable for non-Americans (and many Americans as well), but some people take a car they still owe money on, trade it in at the dealership for a new car (bought on credit) and roll the old loan into the new note. They therefore automatically owe more on the new car than it's worth - that's being upside down. Another example is the people who bought houses at the height of the market with little or no money down. The houses today generally appraise for less than the amount of the mortgage - the owners owe more than the current value of the house (presumably what they could get if they sold it), so they are also "upside down."

Hope that helps!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Suzan Hamer  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 16:09
English
+ ...
Glossary terms? Oct 5, 2008

Interesting and informative, thanks for the link. Will you be adding the terms to a glossary so they will be available/searchable on ProZ? If you don't, I may (when I have time).

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Marina Menendez  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 11:09
Member
English to Spanish
+ ...
Thanks Nicolette !!! Oct 8, 2008

very useful ; )

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Daina Jauntirans  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:09
German to English
+ ...
Another resource on this topic Oct 9, 2008

For those of you interested in learning more about this issue (in English), the National Public Radio program "This American Life" had two very good episodes about the housing crisis and the credit crunch. You can listen to these free online (I think they're MP3 files - I listen using Windows Media Player). Here are the links:

"Giant Pool of Money" about the housing crisis
http://www.thislife.org/Radio_Episode.aspx?episode=355

"Another Frightening Show About the Economy" about the credit crunch
http://www.thislife.org/Radio_Episode.aspx?sched=1263


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Maria Castro[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

"New" financial words/phrases

Advanced search


Translation news





SDL Trados Studio 2017 Freelance
The leading translation software used by over 250,000 translators.

SDL Trados Studio 2017 helps translators increase translation productivity whilst ensuring quality. Combining translation memory, terminology management and machine translation in one simple and easy-to-use environment.

More info »
Déjà Vu X3
Try it, Love it

Find out why Déjà Vu is today the most flexible, customizable and user-friendly tool on the market. See the brand new features in action: *Completely redesigned user interface *Live Preview *Inline spell checking *Inline

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs