Mobile menu

Here ye, here ye! Everything you ever wanted to know about Archaic English
Thread poster: Gayle Wallimann

Gayle Wallimann  Identity Verified
Local time: 13:42
Member (2001)
French to English
+ ...
Nov 19, 2003

Never get your "thees" and "yes" mixed up again. Just what you've all been waiting for, I'm sure. This is a nice link that will be a great help for those of you who translate old literary text, libretti, poems etc. The chart is very clear.

http://dan.tobias.name/frivolity/archaic-grammar.html
Gayle


Direct link Reply with quote
 

DGK T-I  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:42
Member (2003)
Georgian to English
+ ...
Thy gift is most welcome Nov 19, 2003

thou art a queen amongst reference providers:-)

Direct link Reply with quote
 
R. James
United States
Local time: 07:42
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Good fun Nov 19, 2003

Thanks, that was refreshing. Some interesting bits in there... I just wish I hadn't accidentally found the author's "Tiffany" site.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:42
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
Thanks be unto thee Nov 19, 2003

I thank thee, fair lady, for thy passing useful link.
But methinks ye town crier would cry "Hear ye!", not "Here ye!"


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Gayle Wallimann  Identity Verified
Local time: 13:42
Member (2001)
French to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Hear ye! Here ye! Nov 19, 2003

Jack Doughty wrote:

I thank thee, fair lady, for thy passing useful link.
But methinks ye town crier would cry "Hear ye!", not "Here ye!"


You are correct, but I was trying to be clever, I like to play with words. Maybe I was a bit far fetched for this one.
Thank you for the compliment


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Parrot  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 13:42
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Ye Aulde Vocabularye (uhhhh... that hurteth...) Nov 19, 2003

benison (noun) -- a spoken blessing
beshrew (verb) -- wish harm upon; put a curse on

fain -- "to want to." "I fain would lie down."

gyves -- A shackle or fetter, especially for the leg, to shackle or fetter

hither -- "to here." "Come hither!"
holpen -- "help," used only after auxiliary verbs. "Wilst thou holpen me?"

irk (verb) -- irritate or vex

meliketh -- "I like it." "Meliketh this book."
meseemeth -- "It seems to me." "Meseemeth strange."

nany -- "no one." "Nany goeth not wither I go." (Note the double negative: perfectly permissible)
nill -- "to not want to." "I nill go with thee."

per·ad·ven·ture (adv.) -- perhaps; perchance, by chance; perhaps; it may be; if; supposing
per·ad·ven·ture (n.) -- chance or uncertainty; doubt
Peradventure there be fifty righteous within the city. --Gen. xviii. 24.
per·chance (adv.) -- perhaps; possibly, by chance; perhaps; peradventure, through chance, "To sleep, perchance to dream.."
prate (v.) -- to talk much and to little purpose; to be loquacious; to speak foolishly; to babble.
prate (n.) -- Empty, foolish, or trivial talk; idle chatter
prater (n.) -- (babbler)
prithee (interj.) - A corruption of pray thee; as, I prithee; generally used without I.

quotha (interj.) -- Indeed; forsooth

sirrah (noun) - contemptuous term of address to an inferior man or boy; often used in anger
sith (conj.) - since.
sith (prep., adv., & conj.) -- since; afterwards; seeing that
staunch (adj) -- firm and steadfast; true, strong or substantial construction or constitution
swik -- "stop." "Swik thou!"

thither -- "from there." "He cometh thither."

whence -- "from where." "Whence goeth he?"
whither -- "to where." "Whither goest thou?"
will-he-nill-he -- "whether one wants it or not." "It wilt rain, will-he-nill-he."

yare (adj; yarer, yarest) -- ready, brisk, or eager
yarely (adv) -- readily or eagerly
yclept -- "named." "I am yclept William."

For I would fain bethank Madam Gail her discoverie...

Guys, can you imagine "Windowes in Archaic English"?


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Gayle Wallimann  Identity Verified
Local time: 13:42
Member (2001)
French to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you Parrot for some vocabulary Nov 20, 2003

Wonderful! I didn't realize that I spoke Archaic English in my daily life...I always say that something "irks" me. Another new thing that I've learned today

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Bruce Popp  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:42
French to English
Shakespeare and Chaucer Nov 20, 2003

Several of these archaisims are commonly used in Shakespeare, and he is considered comprehensible for contemporary English speakers.

Has anyone else tried reading Chaucher using just the marginal glosses? Lot's of fun.

On the other hand I have great difficulty with La Chanson de Roland or Villon in the original language.

Bruce


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Mario Marcolin  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 13:42
Member (2003)
English to Swedish
+ ...
Prate archaic? Nov 21, 2003

"Young men, draw your shavers,
and quit this scoundrel from my sight;
For if I stand to prate with him,
he'll prate with me all night."
Bellerby Sword Dance Play, 1879 & 1926
M.Karpeles 1928
http://www.shef.ac.uk/uni/projects/tdrg/Texts/87se19km.htm


[Edited at 2003-11-21 12:38]

[Edited at 2003-11-21 12:40]

[Edited at 2003-11-21 12:40]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Mario Marcolin  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 13:42
Member (2003)
English to Swedish
+ ...
BTW Nov 21, 2003

prata (Swedish V. inf) = to talk [normal sense]
prat (Swedish N) = foolish, or trivial talk
just like prate (n.)

mario

[Edited at 2003-11-21 12:39]


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Maria Castro[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Here ye, here ye! Everything you ever wanted to know about Archaic English

Advanced search


Translation news





SDL Trados Studio 2017 Freelance
The leading translation software used by over 250,000 translators.

SDL Trados Studio 2017 helps translators increase translation productivity whilst ensuring quality. Combining translation memory, terminology management and machine translation in one simple and easy-to-use environment.

More info »
memoQ translator pro
Kilgray's memoQ is the world's fastest developing integrated localization & translation environment rendering you more productive and efficient.

With our advanced file filters, unlimited language and advanced file support, memoQ translator pro has been designed for translators and reviewers who work on their own, with other translators or in team-based translation projects.

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs