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Looking for good Swiss>German/Austrian German dictionaries/glossaries
Thread poster: Ron Stelter
Ron Stelter  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:33
Partial member (2003)
German to English
Apr 25, 2004

I have recently been trying to buy more dictionaries to improve my range of offerings. Today, I'm working on a Swiss tourism document. Unfortunately, this one seems to have a very large number of terms that are Swiss German, involving place names, river names, names of festivals, other cultural events, etc. (Fluehe, Waeldi, Huehnertrog, etc.) You know, the type of stuff which probably isn't so hard if you are Swiss, but potentially "finding religion" difficult if you aren't. (The majority of my travels/study have been in Germany.) I thought for future reference I would like to buy a dictionary which would help with such terms. (I suppose finding some detailed maps will help as well.) Something which would have English as its target language or at least standard High German. It seems like there really aren't a lot of such dictionaries out there. Could you make a good recommendation for a dictionary or online glossary?

It seems to present less of a problem at this point as I have some experience with this by now, but any similar recommendations for Austrian German appreciated as well.

Thanks.



[Edited at 2004-04-25 13:51]

[Edited at 2004-04-25 13:52]

[Edited at 2004-04-25 13:53]


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Anja Eichelberg
Local time: 07:33
English to German
Schweizerdeutsches Wörterbuch Apr 26, 2004

The only general Swiss language reference book that comes to my mind is the "Schweizerdeutsches Wörterbuch", a 17 volumes project which hasn't been completed yet (I think 15 volumes have been published so far). Probably it isn't affordable, but you might find it in certain libraries.

http://www.sagw.ch/dt/Kommissionen/woerterbuch/gegenwart.html


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Trudy Peters  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 01:33
German to English
+ ...
Duden Taschenbücher Apr 26, 2004

Hi Ron,

There are two Duden Taschenbücher:

"Wie sagt man in Österreich" (ISBN 3-411-01794-5)
and
"Wie sagt man in der Schweiz" (ISBN 3-411-04131-5)

Mine are pretty old (1980 and 1989, resp.), but there may be newer versions.

They're not very comprehensive, but help occasionally nonetheless.

Trudy


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LuciaC
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:33
English to Italian
+ ...
Some more tips Apr 26, 2004

I lived many years in Switzerland and work with many Swiss clients. It's true, there aren't many dictionaries but you could check Swiss online bookshops or even give them a ring. People are extremely nice and will help you.

Also, whenever I go to Switzerland, about once a year these days, I buy reference material like atlases and travel guides if they look well written and/or well translated (into Italian). I often find small dictionaries (like 'Schweizerdeutsch für Alle', Urs Dörig, Kümmerly+Frey and others) that are marketed locally and couldn't be found abroad.

But I do think that the best sources are our ProZ.com colleagues. There is also a YahooGroup called Swisstranslators.
I can't speak for Austria though.
Tschüss
Lucia


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Daina Jauntirans  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:33
Member (2005)
German to English
+ ...
Here are a couple for Austria Apr 26, 2004

Österreichisches Wörterbuch (38. Auflage)
öbv & hpt, Wien
ISBN 3-215-12653-2

Online:
http://www.aeiou.at/aeiou.encyclop
http://reference.allrefer.com/country-guide-study/austria/


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Oliver Walter  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:33
Member (2005)
German to English
+ ...
2 kinds of Swiss German, & try Newsgoups May 2, 2004

Ron Stelter wrote:

I have recently been trying to buy more dictionaries to improve my range of offerings. Today, I'm working on a Swiss tourism document. Unfortunately, this one seems to have a very large number of terms that are Swiss German, involving place names, river names, names of festivals, other cultural events, etc. (Fluehe, Waeldi, Huehnertrog, etc.)
...etc...

There seem to be 2 kinds of Swiss German: the dialect spoken by about 60% of the population (unintelligible to most German speakers from Germany) and the Swiss "Schriftdeutsch" which is normal German but with some words used only in Switzerland. The Swiss-German dictionary project is probably for the dialect.
Specific questions about Swiss Schriftdeutsch terms such as those in a tourist brochure could be put in a Usenet Newsgroup, such as one of the ch.* hierarchy. Beware, however; some of these are flooded with pornographic and anti-semitic posts; others are relatively free.
Oliver Walter


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Ron Stelter  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:33
Partial member (2003)
German to English
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks, Trudy May 7, 2004

Thanks, Trudy,

I went ahead and bought the dictionary "Wie sagt man in Oesterreich?" I've already received it. Actually, I think you may have been a little modest. It may not be comprehensive, but I think it's going to be quite helpful. Unfortunately, I couldn't find the other one "Wie sagt man in der Schweiz?" anywhere. Amazon or elsewhere. I pre-ordered it from Amazon, but no luck so far.

If anyone reads this out there and has a copy they'd like to sell, I'd pay a good price for it.





Trudy Peters wrote:

Hi Ron,

There are two Duden Taschenbücher:

"Wie sagt man in Österreich" (ISBN 3-411-01794-5)
and
"Wie sagt man in der Schweiz" (ISBN 3-411-04131-5)

Mine are pretty old (1980 and 1989, resp.), but there may be newer versions.

They're not very comprehensive, but help occasionally nonetheless.

Trudy


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Ron Stelter  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:33
Partial member (2003)
German to English
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks everyone May 7, 2004

I'd like to thank everyone who participated with suggestions or offers of help.

Thanks again.

Ron


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