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certifying a translation
Thread poster: Anne Grimes

Anne Grimes
United States
Local time: 06:59
Member (2005)
French to English
+ ...
Sep 2, 2005

Hi, everyone:
I have a question regarding certifying a translation. I am doing a medical translation which the client needs certified that the content is the same as the original document.How does one do this? Is the signature of another translator sufficient, or does one take it to a notary public, or ? Any ideas would be great.Thanks in advance,Anne Estrada


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Fiona Gonçalves  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 11:59
Member
Portuguese to English
+ ...
I think it depends on where you are (or where the translation is going) Sep 2, 2005

I've seen threads about this before, I think on the IOL (Institute of Linguists) site, and I'm fairly sure there's no fixed "international" rule. Here in Portugal, for example, the notaries have a special form for exactly this purpose. You take the translation and original along to them, fill in the form, they notarise it and that's it. In the UK, on the other hand, I believe there is no equivalent to the form used in Portugal and you have to write out a declaration and put some sort of stamp or seal on it (UK-based colleagues, please feel free to correct me if I'm wrong on this point!)
If your translation is intended for your own country, then for sure another colleague from there will know the answer, but if its for elsewhere, then it might be worth saying which country it's intended for so someone from there can advise you on what's best.


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xxxsarahl
Local time: 03:59
English to French
+ ...
You should ask your client Sep 2, 2005

Hi Anne

I have been asked to certify my medical translations more than once myself. But it never involved a notary public. Some of my clients have a form to that effect that I just signed. In some cases I just drew the form myself.

If you need a template, send me an email, I'll be more than happy to send you one.


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Anne Grimes
United States
Local time: 06:59
Member (2005)
French to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you Sep 2, 2005

The translation is for Germany, and the client did not know either, he is the one who asked me how to certify it. He is just a private person ,not an agency. Yes, Sarah, that would be great if you could email me the form to use, I would really appreciate that. annesdaycare2004@yahoo.com is my email address.

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Vladimir Dubisskiy  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:59
English to Russian
+ ...
notary notarizes Sep 2, 2005

Hi, Anne,
I believe those issues are often misunderstood by clients - i mean "certify" and "notarize".
Translator can certify her/his own work providing a so-called certification letter (if this translator is a certified one, - and with Canada it will probably be: accredited, say, with Gov of Canada (with business number with CRA, registered with provincial business registry with translation services confirmed).

Another thing: get a notary public put his/her stamp on the translation. But in this case a notary public (who can not neither translate nor judge the translation) verifies only your signature (i.e. name).
Notary (even knowing the language) is not supposed to do both -check translation and notarize it. Know that for sure for Canada. And how notary public not being a language professional can judge on the quality of translation?

Very best,

Vladimir
Certified Canadian translator))
PS: if you do not know:
Properly done notarized translation of birth certificate (only) in Canada done through an agency would cost you about $100.00.





[Edited at 2005-09-02 22:57]


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Yelena.  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:59
English to Russian
+ ...
Yes Sep 3, 2005

Absolutely, Vladimir! A notary can only witness your signature, that's all! They do not verify the translation...

[Edited at 2005-09-03 20:57]


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gazbeton
Turkey
Local time: 13:59
Russian to English
+ ...
Certifiying a translation Sep 3, 2005

anne estrada wrote:

Hi, everyone:
I have a question regarding certifying a translation. I am doing a medical translation which the client needs certified that the content is the same as the original document.How does one do this? Is the signature of another translator sufficient, or does one take it to a notary public, or ? Any ideas would be great.Thanks in advance,Anne Estrada


As for me to certify a translation one has to to it to the Notary Public.A certified translator means he/she works with the Notary and certifies the translations. Only the signature of another translator will not be dufficient as this is to do with the medicals, the people will act accordingly to your translations, which makes things more serious.
Hope I am a bit help to your question, regards,
Oya Özkan


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Anne Grimes
United States
Local time: 06:59
Member (2005)
French to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
I see.. Sep 3, 2005

Vladimir Dubisskiy wrote:

Hi, Anne,
I believe those issues are often misunderstood by clients - i mean "certify" and "notarize".
Translator can certify her/his own work providing a so-called certification letter (if this translator is a certified one, - and with Canada it will probably be: accredited, say, with Gov of Canada (with business number with CRA, registered with provincial business registry with translation services confirmed).

Another thing: get a notary public put his/her stamp on the translation. But in this case a notary public (who can not neither translate nor judge the translation) verifies only your signature (i.e. name).
Notary (even knowing the language) is not supposed to do both -check translation and notarize it. Know that for sure for Canada. And how notary public not being a language professional can judge on the quality of translation?

Very best,

Vladimir
Certified Canadian translator))
PS: if you do not know:
Properly done notarized translation of birth certificate (only) in Canada done through an agency would cost you about $100.00.

If I am registered with the government for GST then I am automatically certified? I can see that a notary would neither know the language nor be able to certify that the translation of it was correct..there seem to be very different views on certification from everyone so far...now I am confused.



[Edited at 2005-09-02 22:57]


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gad
United States
Local time: 06:59
Member
French to English
I can send you an example, as well Sep 4, 2005

Anne, I would be happy to email you an example, but keep in mind that it may be local to where I work. I would want you to use it as an example but not share it with anyone else, please, and especially not any personal information included on it, of course.

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xxxCipo
German to English
+ ...
certifying translations in Italy Sep 5, 2005

Vladimir Dubisskiy wrote:

Hi, Anne,
I believe those issues are often misunderstood by clients - i mean "certify" and "notarize".
Translator can certify her/his own work providing a so-called certification letter (if this translator is a certified one, - and with Canada it will probably be: accredited, say, with Gov of Canada (with business number with CRA, registered with provincial business registry with translation services confirmed).

Another thing: get a notary public put his/her stamp on the translation. But in this case a notary public (who can not neither translate nor judge the translation) verifies only your signature (i.e. name).
Notary (even knowing the language) is not supposed to do both -check translation and notarize it. Know that for sure for Canada. And how notary public not being a language professional can judge on the quality of translation?

Very best,

Vladimir
Certified Canadian translator))
PS: if you do not know:
Properly done notarized translation of birth certificate (only) in Canada done through an agency would cost you about $100.00.





[Edited at 2005-09-02 22:57]


Hi,
I actually had a similar question about certifying a translation in Italy and thought I'd post here in case anyone knows. As far as I know, the translation and original must be brought to the court/tribunale where it is stamped by a court official. A client of mine has already had some university transcripts translated and proofread but now needs them officially certified. The translator did not certify the translation by means of a declaration or anything. My client is wondering if she can take the documents to the tribunale herself or if she would need a declaration from the translator or if this can only be done by the translator.

I wish certification was as simple everywhere as in Canada! It's great..

Thanks for any info,
Miriam


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Elena Marshall  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:59
English to Ukrainian
+ ...
TEMPLATE TO CERTIFY TRANSLATION Aug 9, 2010

HI SARAH,

I'M RUSSIAN/UKRAINIAN INTERPRETER/TRANSLATOR FROM LONDON.
WOULD YOU PLEASE SEND ME YOUR TEMPLATE TO CERTIFY TRANSLATION?

THANK YOU,
ELENA

xxxsarahl wrote:

Hi Anne

I have been asked to certify my medical translations more than once myself. But it never involved a notary public. Some of my clients have a form to that effect that I just signed. In some cases I just drew the form myself.

If you need a template, send me an email, I'll be more than happy to send you one.


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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 07:59
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Is it? Aug 10, 2010

xxxCipo wrote:
I wish certification was as simple everywhere as in Canada! It's great..


Some countries have laws on certified translations. I've explained the system in Brazil at http://www.lamensdorf.com.br/faqs.html .

As AFAIK Canada (and many other countries) doesn't have a law on this matter, it's up to each agency to set up their own requirements.

One Brazilian professional moved to Canada, and wanted to have her degree revalidated. The board overseeing her profession required a certified translation of her complete 120-page course syllabus. It was done by a PT-EN translator in Canada, certified by ATA and another Canadian institurion. That translation was rejected. The board required a certified translation by a translator certified in the document issuing country, whatever were the official rules there. So the whole translation had to be redone in Brazil, by a translator certified by the Brazilian government (at statutory rates!).

I know that my sworn translations into Portuguese are officially valid anywhere in Brazil. However when it's about me officially translating into English (I'm not cerrtified for other languages), I advise all my clients to check the translation requirements specifically with whatever agency abroad where they intend to submit that, to save time and money.


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Soonthon LUPKITARO(Ph.D.)  Identity Verified
Thailand
Local time: 17:59
Partial member (2004)
English to Thai
+ ...
In Thailand Aug 10, 2010

José Henrique Lamensdorf wrote:
I know that my sworn translations into Portuguese are officially valid anywhere in Brazil. However when it's about me officially translating into English (I'm not cerrtified for other languages), I advise all my clients to check the translation requirements specifically with whatever agency abroad where they intend to submit that, to save time and money.

In Thailand, we have at least 2 duplicate systems:

1. Certification of legal organization e.g. court, law office, Ministry of Justice
2. Certification of Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

But we lack certification body for technical documents. For EN>TH documents, some public agencies certify the document de facto. But for non-English language pairs, the translators shall certify themselves. For legal documents, notary public certifies existence of documents, not exactness of the contents of translations. The reason is that, Thailand (and many other countries) has insufficient experts on various languages.

Best regards,

Soonthon L.


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Wolf Kux  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 07:59
Member (2006)
German to Portuguese
+ ...
Certification for Germany Aug 10, 2010

Anne,

as a public translator between brazilian portuguese and german languages, if I do translations to German, I suggest to my clients to go to the german Consulate and ask for a so-called "consularization". This is a document that says (in german, of course!) that "Wolf is a known Public Translator approved by JUCEMG." With that, my translations become valid documents in Germany.

Hope that helps.


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