The region where you live affects the words you use...
Thread poster: Nathalie M. Girard, ALHC
Nathalie M. Girard, ALHC  Identity Verified
English to French
+ ...
Nov 27, 2002

Good afternoon everyone!



A friend sent me the following article. I thought it would be interesting to share it here, and see what my fellow Prozians think!



Have a wonderful day!

Nathalie



~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*



The region where you live affects the words you use...Not to mention the pronunciation



By Francine Dubé

National Post





Wednesday, November 27, 2002



That long, tilting board at the local playground, that children play on,

what do you call it? A teeter-totter? You must be from British Columbia. A

see-saw? You\'re a Montrealer.



Do you want pepperoni, mushrooms, green peppers and cheese on that pizza? In

Montreal, that\'s all-dressed. In Edmonton, it\'s a deluxe.



How we talk reveals a lot about us, in some cases even our area code, says

McGill University linguistics professor Charles Boberg, who together with

students interviewed 600 people over three years to determine whether there

are cross-Canada differences in speech.



\"If an Edmontonian were to go to Toronto and say, \"Excuse me, where is the

nearest parkade?\" people would look at him like he was from Mars,\" Prof.

Boberg says. \"It\'s completely unknown in Toronto, yet it\'s just the normal

word for it in Winnipeg or Edmonton.\"



The expression in Toronto, for Edmontonians contemplating a visit, is

parking garage.



Unlike the United States, where accents can reveal what part of New York

City you live in, or Britain, where distances as small as 50 kilometres

create ponds of varying word usage and accents, Canada\'s English is

remarkably uniform. Nonetheless, there are small but distinguishable

differences between regions that probably provide us at some subtle level

with a sense of local or regional identity, says Prof. Boberg.



Montrealers, as always, distinguish themselves the most. In Montreal, a

convenience store is a dépanneur, even to anglophones. A one-bedroom

apartment with a kitchen and living room is not a one-bedroom or a bachelor

or a studio, it\'s a 3 1/2. A significant number of Montrealers, reporting

their results on a test, would say they scored nine on 10, instead of nine

out of 10, the expression used overwhelmingly in the rest of Canada.



Montrealers -- again, even the anglophones -- are the only Canadians who

withdraw money from a \"guichet.\" Most Canadians get their money from a bank

machine, while Americans get their from ATMs.



Montrealers pay at the cash, instead of the cashier, which is where Prairie

folk like to pay for things.



\"Americans think that sounds funny,\" Prof. Boberg says. \"They pay at the

register; cash is what you use to pay with, it\'s not where you pay.\"



Others are not so obvious. The metal device over a sink or bathtub that

controls the flow of water? Canadians are divided on whether it\'s a faucet

or a tap, but to most Prairie dwellers, it\'s a tap.



That thing with shoulder straps, carried on a student\'s back to hold books?

In the Atlantic provinces, they are called bookbags; in British Columbia,

nearly everyone calls it a backpack; in Montreal, a significant minority

refers to them as schoolbags.



A notebook is a scribbler in Atlantic Canada and to many people on the

Prairies. Atlantic Canadians call eavestroughs gutters.





© Copyright 2002 National Post



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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 17:03
English to Spanish
+ ...
In a big world Nov 27, 2002

In a big world there are still a lot of small worlds despite the advent of mass communications. Of course, many of the English terms you have put down are also used in the U.S. while others I suspect are not.



Then we have Spanish, about 20 countries there, plus countries like Mexico that are very large and diverse. However, in Spanish we all seem to get by quite well as the language is amazingly uniform all over, yet wherever you go, the local flavor is always there, and it never ends.


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Anna Taylor  Identity Verified
US Minor Outlying Isl.
Local time: 18:03
English to French
+ ...
Always interesting Nov 28, 2002

Thank you for posting the article. I find these little differences completely fascinating, and often leads to a bit of confusion and lots of fun.

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sylvie malich
Germany
Local time: 01:03
German to English
Well... Nov 28, 2002


\"Unlike the United States, where accents can reveal what part of New York

City you live in, or Britain, where distances as small as 50 kilometres

create ponds of varying word usage and accents, Canada\'s English is

remarkably uniform.\"

...

I don\'t know, when my brother calls from Vancouver I sure know it\'s him and not one of my relatives from PEI. (C:

...



\"Montrealers pay at the cash, instead of the cashier, which is where Prairie

folk like to pay for things.\"



You know I always look for the \"cash desk\" when I\'ve got something to buy. Where did I get that from??



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Domenica Grangiotti  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:03
English to Italian
+ ...
A view of Italy Nov 28, 2002

I\'m Italian and I can say that your pronunciation and your choice of words do reveal where you come from.

I am from Piemonte, but try and speak with a Toscano, a Siciliano or a Veneto and then let me know!!!

However, I see this diversity as a way of enriching the language (provided that grammar is preserved... I am thinking about congiuntivi - subjunctive - for instance).



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