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Thread poster: Tae Kim
What is the proper way to write dates in British English?
Tae Kim  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 11:29
Member (2007)
English to Korean
+ ...
Jul 10, 2007

Hello,

I am translating a Korean document into English that British and European audiences will read. I have a problem of writing certain dates in British way. I know in American English, it's month, date, and year. Is it, date, month, and year in British English? Like as in, 5, January, 2007? Or is it, just 5 January, 2007 with no comma between 5 and January? Koreans write year first, and then, month and date, as in 2007, January, 5. This is all bit confusing,so I thought I'd get help in this site. Thank you. Have a wonderful day, translators.


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Tina Colquhoun  Identity Verified
Local time: 19:29
Danish to English
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Date, month, year Jul 10, 2007

Hello

It's date, month, year in British English.

5 January 2007

No commas.


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Damian Harrison
Germany
Local time: 20:29
German to English
Oxford Style Guide Jul 10, 2007

According to the Oxford Style Manual it´s Day Month Year with no internal punctuation
i.e. 2 November 1993

[Edited at 2007-07-10 21:35]


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Timothy Barton
Spain
Local time: 20:29
French to English
+ ...
I agree Jul 10, 2007


Damian Harrison wrote:

According to the Oxford Style Manual it´s Day Month Year with no internal punctuation
i.e. 2 November 1993

[Edited at 2007-07-10 21:35]


That's the style I use. Punctuation is not needed. And no "the" at the beginning (though you would say it if you read it out aloud).


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Steven Capsuto  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 14:29
Partial member (2004)
Spanish to English
+ ...
...trippingly on the tongue... Jul 11, 2007


Timothy Barton wrote:
That's the style I use. Punctuation is not needed. And no "the" at the beginning (though you would say it if you read it out aloud).


I'd never even thought about how to say it out loud, though I've gotten used to writing it for European clients.

Do you pronounce "3 November 2007" as "the third of November 2007"?


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Melzie
Local time: 20:29
French to English
+ ...
a few pointers Jul 11, 2007

I went to a very correct 'preparatory school for young ladies' (their words not mine) the format given was
Wednesday 11th July 2007
no punctuation, no the, no of when written, the th ALWAYS placed in the air as an exponent. If you set your Word language at British English it will do this automatically for you (I'm sorry, I don't know about any other word processing software)
When said it is
Wednesday the eleventh of July 2007

here are some links

http://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/vocabulary/date/written

http://english2american.com/blurb/dateformat.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Date_format


[Edited at 2007-07-11 06:42]


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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 20:29
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
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And... Jul 11, 2007


Steven Capsuto wrote:
Do you pronounce "3 November 2007" as "the third of November 2007"?


And... do you say "two thousand and seven", "two thousand seven" (which I hear in many US films), or "twenty oh seven"? And when we reach double digits... might it then become "twenty thirteen" (for 2013)?


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Melzie
Local time: 20:29
French to English
+ ...
this one bugs me too... Jul 11, 2007


Samuel Murray wrote:


Steven Capsuto wrote:
Do you pronounce "3 November 2007" as "the third of November 2007"?


And... do you say "two thousand and seven", "two thousand seven" (which I hear in many US films), or "twenty oh seven"? And when we reach double digits... might it then become "twenty thirteen" (for 2013)?


logic would have it that since 2001 we should have been saying twenty oh one, we haven't. It's all Arthur C. Clarke and Stanley Kubrick's fault of course, Coupled with the Y2K scare mongering. What remains to be seen is if we will switch over when we move into 'double' figures (twenty ten instead of two thousand and ten). Personally I opt for the former but it's the sort of thing you can't really go against the crowd on, as it's important to make yourself understood to the greatest number.


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Niraja Nanjundan  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:59
German to English
Question Jul 11, 2007

Is it still correct to write "3rd November" and "5th January" or is this way of writing dates not used that much any more?

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xxxJon O  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:29
Dutch to English
+ ...
For what it's worth... Jul 11, 2007

I always write 3rd/4th/5th etc. rather than just the number and would always say two thousand AND seven..

Also, I nearly always translate use of the 24 hour clock common in most European languages (18.00 - 20.00 etc.) into a PM or AM version. I've no idea whether the relevant linguistic authorities approve of this but as a native UK speaker, it certainly feels more comfortable and familiar to read the time in this way.


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liz askew  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:29
Member (2007)
French to English
+ ...
Writing the date in UK English Jul 11, 2007

Despite the "official" version, i.e. 3 November 2006, current and past usage would be:


3 November 2006

OR

3rd November 2006


More than one style is acceptable, and I remember this from when I did RSA shorthand and typing in 1975..

Take a look at a broad section of UK letters and you will find both exist and are used frequently.


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Mandy Williams  Identity Verified
Local time: 20:29
German to English
For Steven and Samuel Jul 11, 2007

Yes, I'd say "The meeting is on the third of November two thousand and seven unless it is postponed until the year two thousand and thirteen".

I also use the day month year format when writing the date - without any punctuation. I used to write 3rd, etc. but I find it looks a little dated nowadays.

And I agree with Jon, I almost always turn 19:00 into 7 p.m.

Hope that helps!
Mandy


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Margreet Logmans  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 20:29
English to Dutch
+ ...
Related question - could I please ask... Jul 11, 2007

...what do you write when the time is noon or midnight?
12.00 hours or 0.00 hours in the 24 hours clock, of course, but what if you want to write pm or am?

I'm asking this specifically because last week I almost missed a deadline by half a day because I wasn't sure whether 12pm was noon or midnight, and the article on time in Wikipedia was inconclusive. I'd assumed it was midnight; the agency said they meant noon. (had to work really hard that morning )

Best,
Margreet


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xxxJon O  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:29
Dutch to English
+ ...
.. Jul 11, 2007

I write 12 midday or 12 midnight. No confusion that way

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Margreet Logmans  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 20:29
English to Dutch
+ ...
Thanks Jon O Jul 11, 2007

I'll do the same from now on.

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What is the proper way to write dates in British English?







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