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The European decimal notation system
Thread poster: ejprotran

ejprotran
Local time: 22:40
English to Japanese
Feb 12, 2003

Hi to all.



This question may be too basic for some folks, but I am a bit confused by the fact that some/most of European countries seem to delimit numbers every two/three digit using a period instead of using a comma.



For example, what would be the equivalent number of 100.00,00 Euros without taking the foreign exchange rates into consideration if it was followed by the US decimal notation system? Would that be 10,000.00 dollars? Could anyone also tell me which European countries delimit numbers every \"two\" digit?



Thank you in advance.

satnii


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Juan Jacob  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 07:40
French to Spanish
+ ...
100.000,00 euros equal 100,000.00 dollars Feb 12, 2003

As far as I know, in Europe decimal is marked by a ,

So, 100.000,00 euros equal 100,000.00 dollars (more or less).

Ciao


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Karl Apsel  Identity Verified
Ireland
Local time: 13:40
Member (2001)
English to German
+ ...
Here we go ... Feb 12, 2003

Quote:


On 2003-02-12 22:43, satnii wrote:

Hi to all.



This question may be too basic for some folks, but I am a bit confused by the fact that some/most of European countries seem to delimit numbers every two/three digit using a period instead of using a comma.



For example, what would be the equivalent number of 100.00,00 Euros without taking the foreign exchange rates into consideration if it was followed by the US decimal notation system? Would that be 10,000.00 dollars? Could anyone also tell me which European countries delimit numbers every \"two\" digit?



Thank you in advance.

satnii





Hi Satnii,



In the UK, Ireland and Britain you use \".\" to indicate the decimal point. One hundred Euros and 50 cents would be expressed as follows:



150.50



In Germany (and I assume in other continental countries as well) the \"point\" that divides the full numbers from the fractions is referred to as \"comma\". Thus, the same amount on the continent is written as follows:



150,50



With amounts over one thousand, dividers are used so that it is easier to recognise the amount. In the English speaking countries this is done by \",\" and on the continent by \".\" (I guess to distinguish from the decimal separation).



One thousand would be expressed in English speaking countries as follows:



1,000



on the continent:



1.000



it then continues as follows:



UK, Ireland, USA etc:



1,000 (one thousand)

10,000 (ten thousand)

100,000 (one hundred thousand)

1,000,000 (one million)

10,000,000 (ten million)

100,000,000 (one hundred million)

1,000,000,000 (one billion)



10,500.50 (ten thousand five hundred [Euro] and fifty cents)



the equivalent on the European continent:



1.000

10.000

100.000

1.000.000

10.000.000

100.000.000

1.000.000.000



10.500,50 (ten thousand five hundred [Euro] and fifty cents).



I do not think that there are any European countries that divide their numbers every \"two\" digits except for telephone numbers in some countries as, I believe, Spain for example (however, if anyone feels that I am wrong on this please feel free to correct me).



On a few occasions I had discussions with confused clients about this - once even with a proofreader. However, this is how it is done - don\'t ask me why



I hope I could help.



All the best



Karl



[ This Message was edited by:on2003-02-13 12:17]

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Marijke Singer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:40
Dutch to English
+ ...
Decimals Feb 13, 2003

Karl is absolutely right. In the Netherlands and in Spain they use the \'comma\' version:

10.000,50



Not all Spanish speaking countries do, however.


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AlwaysMoving
Local time: 21:40
Spanish
+ ...
billions Feb 13, 2003

In Spain \"un billón\" is 1.000.000.000.000

But in English one billion is actually one thousand millions.

How about in the rest of the countries?

This always bugs me when they talk about money in the EU in english


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Arthur Borges
China
Local time: 21:40
English
+ ...
Number punctuation Feb 13, 2003

In summary, Europe uses the comma where the US & UK use the period (full stop).

Some Europeans perform radical surgery and use NO punctuation.

Grouping by two happens after the decimal point, or of course leftmost.

My understanding of numbers is the US billion is \"1,000 million\" whereas the UK (and French) billions are \"one million million\". Because of the potential for confusion, it is safest in the UK to write \"1,000 million\" when describing a US billion. However, I am convinced that inflation is as certain as death and taxes and, s seen from the little table below, this is only a temporary fix.



US UK

million million

billion milliard

trillion billion



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Karl Apsel  Identity Verified
Ireland
Local time: 13:40
Member (2001)
English to German
+ ...
One Billion (English) vs Eine Billion (German) Feb 13, 2003

Quote:


On 2003-02-13 03:16, AlwaysMoving wrote:

In Spain \"un billón\" is 1.000.000.000.000

But in English one billion is actually one thousand millions.

How about in the rest of the countries?

This always bugs me when they talk about money in the EU in english





Yes, another point of major confusion at times ...



1,000,000,000,000, i.e. one thousand millions is \"eine Milliarde\" in German and \"one billion\" in English.



1,000,000,000,000,000, i.e. one thousand billions (GER: \"Milliarden\") is \"one trillion\" in English and \"eine BILLION\" in German. Regularly misinterpreted in amateur translations and I even quite often heard it falsely translated on German news programs ...

[ This Message was edited by:on2003-02-13 12:13]

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ejprotran
Local time: 22:40
English to Japanese
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you, everyone! Feb 15, 2003

Quote:


On 2003-02-12 23:52, charliea wrote:

I do not think that there are any European countries that divide their numbers every \"two\" digits except for telephone numbers in some countries as, I believe, Spain for example (however, if anyone feels that I am wrong on this please feel free to correct me).

Karl





I am still wondering if there are some European countries that delimit numbers in currencies every TWO digit though...



satnii





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