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Certified / sworn translators around the world
Thread poster: rebo
rebo
English to Spanish
Oct 24, 2005

I am interested in the figure of certified or sworn translators around the world. Please, could you tell me all you know about certified/sworn transltors in your country? Thanks!!

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Mercedes Davila
Local time: 11:19
Spanish to English
+ ...
INTERPRETE PÚBLICO Oct 24, 2005

In Venezuela a certified or sworn translator is called an INTERPRETE PUBLICO. A degree that is issued by the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Justice of Venezuela, after undergoing a written and oral test in Spanish and the other language. Then the Ministry issues you a Diploma that is published in the Official Gazette and then should be registered with the Public Registry or other public offices.
Any document in a foreing language will only have "legal" value in Venezuela if it is translated by an Interprete Público (some peoply tend to call them Official Translators)and bears his/her "official seal". It is also customary to register with the local embassies of the country speaking the language for which you have obtained your degree.


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Spencer Allman
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:19
Finnish to English
UK Oct 25, 2005

In the UK there is no sworn translator system. Neither is there such a thing as a certified translator, although there are systems of accreditaion in place in that translators may be recognised by certian institutions.

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rebo
English to Spanish
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you Mercedes and Spencer Oct 25, 2005

Thank you for answering. Do you know how the situation is in Australia, New Zealand, USA or Canada?

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Angus Woo
Local time: 23:19
Chinese to English
+ ...
This is interesting Oct 30, 2005

Rebo's question is also something I would like to know. Is there anyone out there who knows anything about this?

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Natalia Zudaire  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 12:19
Member (2004)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Argentina Oct 31, 2005

In Argentina to become a translator you have to attend a four-to-five years university course of studies. There you can get a degree on Sworn Translator or any other type, according to the study plan. If you receive the Sworn Translator degree, you can register on the courts and relevant associations. You can check out the webpage http://www.traductores.org.ar to find out more.

I will copy here a part that talks about this:


The Sworn Translator: a key figure

The sworn translator armed with training, technique and versatility, is the only professional in the translation field who is able to attest to the accuracy of the entrusted assignment. Only the Sworn Translator, much like the notary public who certifies the authenticity of a document, may vouch for the content of a text taken from another language.

A centenary tradition in Argentina

The Argentine Republic is privileged in a way as are few countries in the world in that its Sworn Translators are equipped with formal academic training and enjoy the prestige of international recognition in the field.

The journey has been a long one. The profession of the Sworn Translator currently functions within a regulatory-legal framework that protects the translator as well as the user public requiring the translator’s services. It is this particular difference that places the Sworn Translator, as defined within the reality of our cultural and socioeconomic condition, in a privileged position with respect to other settings and scenarios in the vast real of translation, be it at the national or international level.


I hope I helped.


Natalia


[Edited at 2005-11-24 02:33]


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Ana Petrov
Local time: 16:19
English to Romanian
+ ...
BELGIUM Nov 7, 2005

rebo wrote:

I am interested in the figure of certified or sworn translators around the world. Please, could you tell me all you know about certified/sworn transltors in your country? Thanks!!


In Belgium there is a difference made between sworn and legalized translations. Sworn= the translation bears the signature and/or stamp of the sworn translator while legalized means that the translation bears also the stamp from the court where the translator is sworn.

Unfortunately there is no unified system for sworn translators throughout Belgium. For example, in Antwerp you need to follow a course, pass a test, then file a request at the court to be sworn. The whole process can take over 18 months. In other courts (Gent, Bruxelles) it is enough to write a letter requesting to be sworn; the court goes through all requests once or twice a year and may decline or approve your request.

Also the time period for legalization differs: in some smaller courts it is done on the spot whereas at other courts you have to wait 24 hours or even 48 (in the summer).


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Balbec
English to French
Australian accreditation institution Nov 11, 2005

rebo wrote:

I am interested in the figure of certified or sworn translators around the world. Please, could you tell me all you know about certified/sworn transltors in your country? Thanks!!


Every translator certified in Australia are by NAATI (National Australian Accreditation for Translators and Interpreters). There may be also a number of translators now living in Australia who were certified overseas. I am an accredited certified translator (with my seal, etc).


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Kameliya  Identity Verified
Russian Federation
Local time: 20:19
English to Russian
+ ...
What is a Certified Translation? Mar 19, 2007

That's what I found on the web
In the United States a certified translation consists of the following three parts:
1) The source-language (original) text
2) The target-language (translated) text
3) A statement signed by the translator or translation company representative, with his or her signature notarized by a Notary Public, attesting that the translator or translation company representative believes the target-language text to be an accurate and complete translation of the source-language text. Sometimes this statement bears the title “Certificate of Accuracy” or “Statement that Two Documents Have the Same Meaning.” Some translators will attach a Curriculum Vitae to the notarized statement.
Please note that any translator and any translation company representatives, regardless of credentials, may “certify” a translation in this way. A translator does not need to be “certified” in order to provide a “certified translation.” It is also important to realize that the Notary Public seal assures only that the signature is that of the person who presented him or herself to the notary. The Notary Public is not attesting to the accuracy of the translation.
What is a certified translator?
In contrast to many other countries, in the United States there is no federal or state licensing or certification for translators. There are some credentials available to translators working in some language pairs in this country, but they do not carry the same weight--in the market place or in the translation community--as federal licensing or certification in other countries.
The American Translators Association offers translator certification in some language pairs. ATA certified translators are required to specify the language pairs and directions in which they are certified. For example, a translator certified in German to English is not necessarily certified in English to German.
The Department of Social & Health Services in Washington State screens translators in several languages to translate DSHS materials. Translators who have passed this screening in a specific language pair may call themselves “DSHS Certified Translators.”
The Translators and Interpreters Guild, a national organization of independent professional language translators and interpreters, announced in September 2000 that it will be offering TTIG Certification for translators.
Please note that there are many languages for which there is no type of certification or screening available in this country. There are many excellent, experienced translators who are not accredited or certified.
In the United States it is not necessary to be certified or licensed in order to provide a certified translation for official use.


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Bowne
Local time: 10:19
More... Jan 30, 2008

Can we get information on more countries?

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Charles Hawtrey  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:19
French to English
Have just translated a university diploma - now client asks for it to be sworn. Any takers? May 27, 2008

rebo wrote:

I am interested in the figure of certified or sworn translators around the world. Please, could you tell me all you know about certified/sworn transltors in your country? Thanks!!


I have done a translation (FR>EN) of a diploma from a Belgium university and now the client asks for it to be sworn. I am English and live in England, client is Belgian living in Belgium (I guess), and I got the work via a Swedish agency. Needless to say I do not know the client.

Can anyone help with accreditation/stamping/swearing to the accuracy? I am stuck otherwise.

Charles


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gsloane  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 10:19
Member (2011)
French to English
+ ...
Certified/Sworn Translations Feb 10, 2009

Charles Hawtrey wrote:

rebo wrote:

I am interested in the figure of certified or sworn translators around the world. Please, could you tell me all you know about certified/sworn transltors in your country? Thanks!!


I have done a translation (FR>EN) of a diploma from a Belgium university and now the client asks for it to be sworn. I am English and live in England, client is Belgian living in Belgium (I guess), and I got the work via a Swedish agency. Needless to say I do not know the client.

Can anyone help with accreditation/stamping/swearing to the accuracy? I am stuck otherwise.

Charles


Try getting it notarised by a notary public.


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Josephine Cassar  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:19
Member (2012)
Italian to English
+ ...
Sworn Translator Feb 3, 2013

If you have to issue a statement of truth, which is what a sworn translation is about, cost has to be included no? How do you know the cost of a sworn translation or how much it cost for a statement of truth? Many thanks. country is Malta, and I do not know the system as I have never been asked for a Statement of truth

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LilianNekipelov  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:19
Member (2013)
Russian to English
+ ...
There are no certified translators in the US, only interpreters Feb 3, 2013

Any translator can testify to the accuracy of his or her translation by preparing a sworn statement -- called the Certificate of accuracy, which has to be signed in front of a notary public, and which is binding. A translator may be held liable for any damages arising out of his, or her translation based on this document.

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564354352  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 16:19
Danish to English
+ ...
State-authorised translators in Denmark Feb 3, 2013

In Denmark, the title 'translatør' [sic, in Danish] is a protected title, which you are only allowed to use if you have been 'authorised' by the Danish Business Authority, a government agency. The straight way to get such authorisation is to complete a Master's degree in translation and interpretation, which consists of a 3-year BA in Danish and two foreign languages followed by a 2-year MA in translation and interpretation in Danish and one foreign language. You have to choose a special line in translation and interpretation during the MA course to be eligible for the state-authorisation (this line has specific modules in technical, financial and legal translation as well as consecutive and simultaneous interpretation). Once you pass your MA exams, the authorisation is a mere formality. The MA course is, to my knowledge, only offered in English, German, French and Spanish (possibly Italian and Russian in one or two places, but I am not sure). If people with other language combinations wish to become state-authorised translators/interpreters, they need to have similar Master's qualifications from another country AND they need to have their certificate(s) verified by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and may even have to sit an additional exam.

For the record, it is possible to study languages and call yourself a 'translator' (Danish: oversætter) or 'interpreter' (Danish: tolk), but the official title of 'translatør' is reserved for those who have followed the course described above.

Once you are a state-authorised translator/interpreter, you can certify translations in your MA language combination (but not in the third language studied for the BA), and issue certifications with a seal that bears a royal crown (a bit showy, I admit, but it looks very official). This is enough to make translated documents legal in many countries, although some countries still insist on translations being 'legalised' by the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and for this to be done, the state-authorised translator must first register his/her signature (in person) with the Ministry.

Any state-authorised translator/interpreter is allowed to interpret at the courts, and we are bound to professional secrecy in relation to all our work, whether NDAs have been signed or not, on a par with lawyers and doctors.



[Edited at 2013-02-03 16:11 GMT]


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