Mobile menu

Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
Installation of cloned hard disk in new pc...
Thread poster: Williamson

Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:09
Flemish to English
+ ...
Sep 21, 2008

I intend to reinstall everything from scratch. it will take about a week.
Within a couple of months, I would like to buy a new pc.
If I make a clone of the HD and install that clone into my new pc, will the new pc recognize and work with the cloned Hard disk or do I have to reinstall everything again? The OS is Windows Vista Ultimate.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Piotr Sawiec  Identity Verified
Local time: 13:09
English to Polish
+ ...
if you use the old hard disk with unchanged partitions it should be fine Sep 21, 2008

but there may be problems when you decide to switch to a new hard disk. Usually you copy a whole partition, so it may be very difficult to restore it to a new one, because they have different specifications. There will be another problem when the letter of the system partition will change. Data in your registry refer to the old partition, C: by default.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jabberwock  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 13:09
Member (2004)
English to Polish
Another PC, another system specs Sep 21, 2008

There might be problems, I am afraid, as the mainboard will be different (and possibly GPU etc.) and these days the differences might be quite significant. Your old system has drivers for the old board, therefore reinstallation of the system will be necessary - however, this does not have to be installation from scratch, but simply overwriting the old system files. Unfortunately, reinstallation of the system might render some of the programs unusable, as the registry might change.

Some people change the hardware without reinstallation, see here (although there are no specific tips for Vista):
http://www.motherboard.windowsreinstall.com/

However, this is usually not recommended, as there might be performance issues (i.e. even if the system seems to work OK, it might not reach its peak capacity).


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Boyan Brezinsky  Identity Verified
Bulgaria
Local time: 14:09
English to Bulgarian
+ ...
Shouldn't have problems with Vista Ultimate Sep 21, 2008

Read these articles for information on CompletePC Backup that comes with Vista:
http://www.minasi.com/showdoc.asp?docname=nws0707.htm
http://www.minasi.com/showdoc.asp?docname=nws0708.htm
http://www.minasi.com/showdoc.asp?docname=nws0801.htm

And consult the Windows Help about the exact process. This CompletePC Backup is not available in 'lesser' versions of Vista (I don't know about Business though), but in your case that is not an issue.

[Edited at 2008-09-21 19:30]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:09
Flemish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Dragon.... Sep 22, 2008

Do you have any idea what to do with the files of Dragon Dictate. I have DragonPreferred 9 in 4 languages + Spanish? Which are the files where the profile of your voice is registered? Does it help simply copying and pasting those files and how do I get them working on the other PC.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Anil Gidwani  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 17:39
German to English
+ ...
When you get your new PC Sep 22, 2008

I use a certain hard disk partitioning scheme that helps in moving from one PC to another, which is about every three years, and it works out quite well, and I can recommend the same for any new PC. However, I would not install a cloned hard disk into your new PC, for the reasons mentioned by posters earlier, notably, changes in hardware configuration cause performance and other driver-related issues.

a) C: partition for the operating system
b) P: partition for programs (The letter P: is far enough not to be disturbed by Windows auto-allocate of drive letters)
c) U: partition for documents

Also keep a record of the users you create on your system AND the order in which you do so.

To move to a new PC:

When I move to a new PC, I migrate P: and U: as is (clone), and C:\users (the only part of C: that is user-dependent, and which contains the Dragon files deep down. Actually, I've moved my Dragon files to U: as well, which is a configurable setting). I recreate users on the new PC exactly as they were on the old PC. Now you do have to export and import ONLY SOME PARTS OF THE REGISTRY that deal with software keys, not the operating system or the hardware, and this can be the tricky part.

Once the program and data partitions and the users area of the C: partition have been migrated, the users recreated, and the software registry entries imported, the new machine, with possibly a new version of Windows, is up and running with all software as it was on the old PC.

[Edited at 2008-09-22 11:49]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Anil Gidwani  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 17:39
German to English
+ ...
Moving Dragon files Sep 22, 2008

Williamson wrote:

Do you have any idea what to do with the files of Dragon Dictate. I have DragonPreferred 9 in 4 languages + Spanish? Which are the files where the profile of your voice is registered? Does it help simply copying and pasting those files and how do I get them working on the other PC.


Copy the Dragon files (entire subdirectory) to another area of your choice. You can see where the files are currently under Naturally Speaking->Manage Users->Browse. You can then change the location of user files via Naturally Speaking->Manage Users->Browse on the new machine. I've shifted my files completely off C:\... (default) to U:\.... Since Dragon is disk intensive, it marginally helps having it off the C:\ partition, which is where the system page file, another heavily used disk area, is also stored. The same logic would apply to moving Dragon from one machine to another.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Fernando Toledo  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 13:09
Member (2005)
German to Spanish
Hm... Sure? Sep 22, 2008

Anil Gidwani wrote:
I recreate users on the new PC exactly as they were on the old PC. Now you do have to export and import ONLY SOME PARTS OF THE REGISTRY that deal with software keys, not the operating system or the hardware, and this can be the tricky part.


Tricky part? this is hacking at top level ,-)

If you can do this, you could install, all licenses you own, for example Trashdos, in so many PC as you want.


Regards


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Christel Zipfel  Identity Verified
Partial member (2004)
Italian to German
+ ...
Interesting! Sep 22, 2008

Anil Gidwani wrote:

a) C: partition for the operating system
b) P: partition for programs (The letter P: is far enough not to be disturbed by Windows auto-allocate of drive letters)
c) U: partition for documents

Also keep a record of the users you create on your system AND the order in which you do so.

To move to a new PC:

When I move to a new PC, I migrate P: and U:


So one does not necessarily need to install programs on partition C:/ where you have the operating system? And so you don't need, when moving to another computer, reinstall all your software? That sounds really interesting! This is always the most annoying and time consuming part when you get a new computer - your own documents are normally saved anyway somewhere and you need just to copy them back.

I have got a new laptop last week and the next days - after having installed XP instead of Vista it came with - I planned to install my programs and everything. So I put the programs straightaway in a partition like M:/ or O:/ right? Strange enough, I never heard about such a simple solution!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Anil Gidwani  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 17:39
German to English
+ ...
Yes it works but you need to be organized Sep 23, 2008

Christel Zipfel wrote:

So one does not necessarily need to install programs on partition C:/ where you have the operating system?



Not at all. I install almost all programs on P:. Your anti-virus program can be installed on C:, since you usually don't want to migrate it anyway. The antivirus CD is a valuable piece of hardware, and when setting up a new machine, it is preferable to install the Antivirus software before browsing the Internet to resolve any issues during the install. The CD is the best proven source of this software.

You have to be very disciplined in this approach, though. Use the P:\ partition extensively (or whatever you name it)


And so you don't need, when moving to another computer, reinstall all your software? That sounds really interesting! This is always the most annoying and time consuming part when you get a new computer - your own documents are normally saved anyway somewhere and you need just to copy them back.


No, you don't. The tricky part is exporting those sections of the registry on the old machine that involve the software installed, and re-importing those sections into the registry on the new machine. (I'll try and post this sometime when I get a chance).

Remember that drive letters have to be the same on old and new machines (P: -> P:, U:->U) (unless you want to change the registry directly, a dangerous move!). Also, users have to be the same on both machines (name and order of creation). There are ways to circumvent these requirements, and I have had to modify registry entries and system directory names to get this to work, but it's not worth the trouble. A disciplined approach in organizing data and programs from the start is far more effective. DO DOCUMENT YOUR INSTALLATION STEP BY STEP SOMEWHERE.


I have got a new laptop last week and the next days - after having installed XP instead of Vista it came with - I planned to install my programs and everything. So I put the programs straightaway in a partition like M:/ or O:/ right? Strange enough, I never heard about such a simple solution!


Yes, that's a good idea. It is a simple solution, but requires an organized way of going about it. Also, one false step (especially when dealing with the Windows registry, even export and import of the registry have to be carefully orchestrated) and you may have to start afresh. But it sure saved my day (and my clients) when my laptop croaked while under warranty and I had to rent a PC till it was repaired. Didn't affect my work a bit!


[Edited at 2008-09-23 09:05]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:09
Flemish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Choices Sep 23, 2008

I intend to buy a new pc and start everything from scratch.

Intel Dual Core E2180 2.0GHz FSB800 1MB BOX
ASROCK 775 Wolfdale1333-GLAN/M2
DDR II 1 Go 667Mhz PC 5300 OEM / BRAND
Aopen DSW2012PA RETAIL 20x Super-Multi DVDRW IDE + NERO
HDD 250Go S-ATA II 300 - 8MB / 16MB CACHE 7200RPM
STANDARD ATX 300W 4 BAIES
Multimedia keyboard STANDARD PS2
Opticale mouse STANDARD
Speakers Standard LC
-*-*--*
INTEL MB
ASUS P5N-E SLI / S775 - FSB 133 - Nvid nForce 650i SLI
INTEL : Intel Dual Core E2180 2.0GHz FSB800 1MB BOX
Memory
DDR II 1 Go 667Mhz PC 5300 OEM / BRAND
Memory
DDR II 1 Go 667Mhz PC 5300 OEM / BRAND
Graphical Card
Geforce 8500GT - 512Mo DDR2 PCIE - TV DVI (SPARKLE)
Floppy- 3''5
Memory Card 3''5 - INTERNAL USB 2.0 Card Reader
Writers Aopen DSW2012PA RETAIL 20x Super-Multi DVDRW IDE + NERO
Tower STANDARD ATX 300W 4 ports
Rechargeable wireless keyboard SilverCrest
Speakers Standard LC
-*-*-

For the tasks we are usually asked to perform : Word-processing, Voice-processing, DTP, use of CATS and databases, what would be the best option and what is the difference between the two configurations

Nowadays, I never partition my hd, but put everything under C and make a clone of the HD.






[Edited at 2008-09-23 12:35]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 13:09
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
GIG RAM vs. 1 GIG RAM Sep 23, 2008

Same processor, so no difference.
You don't say the HDD for the second system.
The second system has an Asus MoBo and a nVidia GPU.
Even if Asus is the better brand as Asrock, both are the same company
What we need is as much CPU and RAM and HDD we can afford, but not a nVidia GPU - so I would chose the first one and install additional RAM and HDD to it.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:09
Flemish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Mobo Sep 24, 2008

The HDD is only 320 gig. I intend to replace it with either 750 gig or 1 TB.
Thx. I'll keep those three elements in mind. Any Mobo you would advise.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Anil Gidwani  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 17:39
German to English
+ ...
Try and negotiate the chips in the DDR II slots Sep 25, 2008

The one resource we translators should pig out on is:

Memory!

The more memory a machine has, the less programs page out to disk and back, and the fewer the interruptions and temporary slowdowns. Of course, this holds true for most users, but especially for us with our TMs, and particularly if we use Dragon or some such memory-intensive VR program.

If the PC vendor agrees, I would ask for a 2 GB DDR II chip in one of the slots on the motherboard, leaving a slot empty for expansion (assuming you have 2 slots, as was the norm). The marketing strategy preferred by vendors of new machines is to stuff 2 1GB chips in the memory slots, so you have to ... ahem... upgrade to a higher capacity memory chip later due to the "planned obsolescence" of one of the chips in the two slots.




[Edited at 2008-09-25 09:40]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Anil Gidwani  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 17:39
German to English
+ ...
And now we have Vista's Complete PC Backup and Restore utility Sep 25, 2008

If you purchase a machine with Windows Vista Business, Ultimate, and Enterprise, you get to use a utility that does something similar: clones "n" hard disks in parallel, which you can use for a system backup/restore. Could be pretty useful in case of a machine crash. I don't use it (because I have Vista Home Premium and am not about to shell out bucks for an upgrade)

(Jeepers: I didn't think the day would come when I recommended any MS product!)

However, this utility will not work for machine migration, say to another version of Windows or another machine with different hardware. Or probably not. The generic solution above is more suitable for migration.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Installation of cloned hard disk in new pc...

Advanced search






Protemos translation business management system
Create your account in minutes, and start working! 3-month trial for agencies, and free for freelancers!

The system lets you keep client/vendor database, with contacts and rates, manage projects and assign jobs to vendors, issue invoices, track payments, store and manage project files, generate business reports on turnover profit per client/manager etc.

More info »
CafeTran Espresso
You've never met a CAT tool this clever!

Translate faster & easier, using a sophisticated CAT tool built by a translator / developer. Accept jobs from clients who use SDL Trados, MemoQ, Wordfast & major CAT tools. Download and start using CafeTran Espresso -- for free

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs