Mobile menu

Switching Windows operating systems - easy?
Thread poster: markj
markj
German to English
+ ...
Jul 1, 2004

Can anyone tell me how straightforward switching Windows operating systems is? I have used Windows ME for years but am tired of the constant crashes and freezes, and would now like to switch to XP. At the same time I would prefer not to have to reload all my programs and files etc. Is it just a case of inserting a CD and away you go, or is it more tricky than that?

Any advice appreciated!


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pawel Gieraszczenko
Poland
Local time: 02:55
Polish to English
+ ...
Changing OS Jul 1, 2004

Yes, it's that simple. You just put the CD in and choose the UPGRADE option. After the installation you'll be able to use all your previously installed programs and files.
I have used Windows XP OS for 2 years and I haven't had any problems so far.

Greetings,

Pawel


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Selçuk Budak  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:55
English to Turkish
+ ...
Depends on the configuration and the options you prefer Jul 1, 2004

There are two options you can choose to upgrade to a new operating system.

1. You can just choose upgrade the current operating system, for example, to Windows 2000 or XP.
In this case, setup asks you to choose between two alternatives: upgrade existing OS or full (new) install. If you choose "upgrade existing OS", then the setup copies necessary files to your HD, keeping all your previous installations (hardware and software configuration) intact. That is to say, you do not need to re-install all your previous software.
This is the easiest way. Just insert the CD, run SETUP, and follow the onscreen instructions.

2. You can install a new OS to a new directory other than the current Windows directory.
In this way, you would have two different operating systems installed in your computer, and can easily switch between them at boot. But you have to reinstall any existing software for the new operating system also if you plan to use such software under the new OS.

This option has certain advantages over other options in that it enables you to switch back and forth between OSs depending on the software you use. For example, you may consider using a certain software package under one OS, but another application with another OS. Or, certain software versions may require a different OS. For example, such packages as QuarkXpress 6, Acrobat 6.0, Corel Ventura 10, etc. require Windows 2000 or XP. In such cases, you may prefer XP for such specific applications, while using your old OS for certain other applications.

h.i.h.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Edward Potter  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:55
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
upgrading to xp Jul 1, 2004

I have ME on one computer and XP on another. Though I have not upgraded from ME to XP, I believe it should be about as easy as sticking in the XP CD and answering the questions.

The laptop I bought a couple of months ago had no operating system. I had to install one so I chose XP rather than the ME I had on my desktop. Installation was a piece of cake, but I had to call customer service to get a product key.

I know someone who upgraded from ME to XP who did the actual upgrade and he said there was no problem.

So, it sounds like it is easy to do.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

PAS  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:55
English to Polish
+ ...
Yes, but... Jul 1, 2004

If you only upgrade, there is a chance all the junk left over from the old system will still be on your drive.

I would sacrifice (or devote) the one day to back everything up, format the drive, do a clean install, download all the updates etc. That way, you will be certain that everything is working properly.

While you're at it, it's a good idea to partition your drive (or install another) and keep your OS and softwre on one drive (C) and all your data on the other (D). That way, any future repairs or whatever will minimize the risk of losing your precious work.

HTH
Pawel Skalinski


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxchance
French to Chinese
+ ...
Agree with Pawel. It is a better way. Jul 1, 2004

PAS wrote:

If you only upgrade, there is a chance all the junk left over from the old system will still be on your drive.

I would sacrifice (or devote) the one day to back everything up, format the drive, do a clean install, download all the updates etc. That way, you will be certain that everything is working properly.

While you're at it, it's a good idea to partition your drive (or install another) and keep your OS and softwre on one drive (C) and all your data on the other (D). That way, any future repairs or whatever will minimize the risk of losing your precious work.

HTH
Pawel Skalinski


Direct link Reply with quote
 

PAS  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:55
English to Polish
+ ...
Some more folk (faux???) wisdom Jul 1, 2004

I thought about it for a minute and decided to reeeaaaallllyyy encourage you to do a clean install.

Consider: It's not something you do once a week, and moving from ME to XP is a BIG jump. It's like moving from a small flat in the basement to a condo on the 30th floor.
When you move into the condo, you want everything to be sparkling clean, without any dirty socks behind the drawers and coffee stains on the rugs.

Get an experienced friend to help you and you won't regret it!

Pawel


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pablo Roufogalis
Colombia
Local time: 20:55
English to Spanish
Stick to what you have until you have a good reason to 'upgrade' Jul 1, 2004

Hello to all.

Unless you have a lot of time and can cope with nasty surprises and the resulting downtime, I'd suggest you keep using ME until you really need a featur of XP or have a new software that requires XP.

Any Windows upgrade, particularly if the existing system is quirky, might bring problems.

Find someone that can clean up you ME system until it is stable.

Also, are you sure you have the required hardware for XP? I'd say thet you need at least a 512 MB RAM machine and at least a 1GHz PIII CPU.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Hynek Palatin  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 02:55
Member (2003)
English to Czech
+ ...
Agree with Pawel. Jul 1, 2004

I agree with Pawel - clean install is much better. And it's best to do it when upgrading to a new computer.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Nedzad Selmanovic
Local time: 02:55
English to Bosnian
+ ...
Agree with Pawel Jul 1, 2004

So you think a clean install is a problem? I can do it within a few hours and have everything ready to go. Upgrading will surely bring you more troubles then you think. Clean install makes your system registry initially clean.
In Bosnia we say that a rider and his donkey are definitely smarter then just a rider himself.
Good luck.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
markj
German to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks everyone! Jul 2, 2004

I'd just like to thank everyone for all their advice. If I weren't having so many problems with my current set-up, I'd probably go for just a simple upgrade, but as I have no wish to transfer my current "junk" to the new system, it probably makes more sense to go for a clean install instead, as recommended by Pawel and others.

Thanks again.
Mark


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jabberwock  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 02:55
Member (2004)
English to Polish
Fresh advice Jul 2, 2004

I can provide you on-hand advice, as I have finished the switch about an hour ago!

I too recommend a clean install; however, if it is possible, keep all the files for a while. I moved onto a completely new disk, but I keep the old one as backup, in case I really need that old socket from the basement. One example would be the normal.dot for the MS Word, where I keep a ton of shortcuts, macros and other settings (all very useful for my work!). I would hate to lose that.

If you are not comfortable with registry editing, skip this paragraph. If you are, use one of many register editors available to back up the registry; you can extract some settings relevant to applications from that too. Of course, you need to be careful!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Andrzej Lejman  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:55
German to Polish
+ ...
WHAT??? Jul 2, 2004

Pawel Gieraszczenko wrote:

Yes, it's that simple. You just put the CD in and choose the UPGRADE option. After the installation you'll be able to use all your previously installed programs and files.
I have used Windows XP OS for 2 years and I haven't had any problems so far.

Greetings,

Pawel


Win XP DELETES all the existing files on the installation disk. There is no more tha case like 98 or Me, where you could "install on install" (what did not make much sense, BTW). The best solution would be IMHO to buy a new disk (consider, their lifetime is max. ca. 5 years), then to install XP on the new disk and to transfer the documents from a backup, that is to be made prior to the abandon of the old disk. If you keep the old disk, you will always have a kind of archive you can always switch to, if necessary.

Good luck
Andrzej


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Switching Windows operating systems - easy?

Advanced search






Across v6.3
Translation Toolkit and Sales Potential under One Roof

Apart from features that enable you to translate more efficiently, the new Across Translator Edition v6.3 comprises your crossMarket membership. The new online network for Across users assists you in exploring new sales potential and generating revenue.

More info »
PerfectIt consistency checker
Faster Checking, Greater Accuracy

PerfectIt helps deliver error-free documents. It improves consistency, ensures quality and helps to enforce style guides. It’s a powerful tool for pro users, and comes with the assurance of a 30-day money back guarantee.

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs