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Et tu brute

English translation: You too, Brutus, my son

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:Et tu Brute
English translation:You too, Brutus, my son
Entered by: Egmont
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07:38 Apr 22, 2002
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Latin term or phrase: Et tu brute
Just straight forward.
Te Rata Boldy
You too, Brutus, my son
Explanation:
Et tu, Brute, fili mi

was the phrase pronounced by Julius Caesar when he was stabbed to death by a group of libertarian conspirators, one of which was his own adoptive son Brutus
Selected response from:

Francesco D'Alessandro
Local time: 09:27
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +6You too, Brutus, my son
Francesco D'Alessandro
5 +1You too, BrutusJohn Kinory
5And you, Brutus?! ------- And you, Brutus ...John Kinory
4Even you, BrutusChris Rowson


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
You too, Brutus, my son


Explanation:
Et tu, Brute, fili mi

was the phrase pronounced by Julius Caesar when he was stabbed to death by a group of libertarian conspirators, one of which was his own adoptive son Brutus

Francesco D'Alessandro
Local time: 09:27
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 11
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Squi: It is not Latin, by the way. Shakespeare used French, as it was much more in use than Latin in his days
24 mins

agree  Сергей Лузан: Exactly.
37 mins

agree  Chris Rowson: I have not seen the form with "fili mi" before - where does this come from? Re French, why would Shakespeare attribute French to Caesar? The vocative form "Brute" also rather indicates Latin.
1 hr
  -> Hi Chris, fili mi is the vocative of filius meus, you can google-search it and you'll find plenty of it. As for the French, I'm in the dark!

agree  xxxkatica
1 hr

agree  Andrea Kopf
1 hr

neutral  John Kinory: The phrase as given does not refer to any sons. The answer is supposed to reflect the question, not confuse the asker by displaying your erudition.
2 hrs

agree  Martyn Glenville-Sutherland
3 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
You too, Brutus


Explanation:
The phrase as given does not contain any reference to sons.

John Kinory
Local time: 08:27
PRO pts in pair: 7

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  irat56: Exactly! Traduttore, tradittore!
10 mins
  -> Thanks!

agree  Antoinette Verburg: exactly
21 mins
  -> Thanks!

disagree  Francesco D'Alessandro: then you should translate: you too, o brute (no capitalization - Longman definition: nonhuman animal...). Traditore with one "t"
55 mins
  -> Nonsense. We are in the business of translation, not of transliteration. We are supposed to use our brains to render a phrase into an idiomatic one in the target language.
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13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Even you, Brutus


Explanation:
Caesar was surprised that his (former) friend and collaborator Brutus was participating in his murder, and the Latin "et" expresses more of this than the simple English "and".

Surprise and disappointment.

Chris Rowson
Local time: 09:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 49
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2 days13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
And you, Brutus?! ------- And you, Brutus ...


Explanation:
And you, Brutus?!

Or:
And you, Brutus ...

This, in fact, is the literal translation. Having thought about it (helped by the comment from Chris), I agree that it is more than just a statement: it's an expression of surprise and disappointment (by Caesar, who was shattered to discover that Brutus too, his friend, turned on him and stabbed him along with the other conspirators).

And why should the simple English above, with the help of question mark + exclamation mark (or an ellipsis, my second suggestion), express exactly that?



John Kinory
Local time: 08:27
PRO pts in pair: 7
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