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podjo

English translation: old friend/partner

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:podjo
English translation:old friend/partner
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00:01 Apr 6, 2004
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Linguistics
Spanish term or phrase: podjo
What does the word "podjo" mean as used in novels centered around the American southwest
Michael Gyd
old friend/partner
Explanation:
Last car to elysian fields..a novel by James Lee Burke

layers of mystery are unwrapped slowly, each layer uncovered reveals new clues and
new directions and new crimes to investigate for Dave and his podjo Clete.I ...
all-computer-books.co.uk/0743245423.html - 31k

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Note added at 2004-04-06 10:09:45 (GMT)
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I also found it used in a novel by James Patterson, \"Along came a Spider.\"

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Note added at 2004-04-06 11:37:42 (GMT)
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I CAN ALSO ADD (FOR THE USA) \"SIDEKICK\"

Yet his old ***sidekick*, bail bondsman Clete Purcell***, worries ... confrontations with his boss and former partner, he keeps ... to investigate for Dave and his ***podjo Clete***
Selected response from:

David Brown
Spain
Local time: 16:51
Grading comment
Thanks. I believe it does mean sidekick (or partner in some cases)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +1old friend/partnerDavid Brown
5pollo: person taken across the border illegalJane Lamb-Ruiz


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
pollo: person taken across the border illegal


Explanation:
pollo: undocumented or illegal alien

pollero: the person who takes the illegal alien across the border

it's not PODJO it's POLLO: first meaning, a chicken...you must be hearing PODJO which is more of an Argentine or Uruguayan way of pronouncing words in Spanish with LL;

ie calle, street, pronounced as cadje...get it?

cheers

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Note added at 1 hr 20 mins (2004-04-06 01:22:40 GMT)
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illegaly

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Note added at 1 hr 21 mins (2004-04-06 01:23:42 GMT)
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the correct transcription would be: pojo...without the D, in my humble opinion.....but some may go for podjo as a transcription

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Note added at 1 hr 32 mins (2004-04-06 01:34:07 GMT)
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pollero would be in Spanish the person who tends the chickens...here, the illegal crosser....

it\'s all over google.....pollo + illegal alien...though one guy says it means chicken HERDER....ha...fat lot he knows about farming...who ever heard of a chicken herder...must be big chickens, ducky...see if you can find that

pollo+ illegal alien + chicken herder

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Note added at 1 hr 42 mins (2004-04-06 01:44:05 GMT)
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Note to Sol:

It\'s probably used in one or two novels by the same author. What the heck else could it be?? Nothing else makes sense. And it is not Navajo. Navajo does not have DJ

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 36

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Sol: He said it's used in novels. I don't see how they could have misspelled it in several books. Could it be a Navajo word?
11 mins
  -> C'mon...the author is an American who doesn't speak Spanish..and thinks that's how you transcribe it....

neutral  Luisa Ramos, CT: I found it mostly as a nickname. I agree with Sol that the context does not agree with the subject of illegal aliens across the US-Mexico border.
22 mins
  -> what??? All we know is that it is a novel; NOTHING ELSE; the asker didn't really give much context...
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
old friend/partner


Explanation:
Last car to elysian fields..a novel by James Lee Burke

layers of mystery are unwrapped slowly, each layer uncovered reveals new clues and
new directions and new crimes to investigate for Dave and his podjo Clete.I ...
all-computer-books.co.uk/0743245423.html - 31k

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-04-06 10:09:45 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I also found it used in a novel by James Patterson, \"Along came a Spider.\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-04-06 11:37:42 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I CAN ALSO ADD (FOR THE USA) \"SIDEKICK\"

Yet his old ***sidekick*, bail bondsman Clete Purcell***, worries ... confrontations with his boss and former partner, he keeps ... to investigate for Dave and his ***podjo Clete***

David Brown
Spain
Local time: 16:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks. I believe it does mean sidekick (or partner in some cases)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: yes it might well mean sidekick but I still think it comes from pollo
6 hrs
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