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carried forward / brought forward

English translation: carried forward from, brought forward to

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:carried forward / brought forward
English translation:carried forward from, brought forward to
Entered by: Jack Doughty
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13:45 Apr 2, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Accounting / Accounting
English term or phrase: carried forward / brought forward
Could somebody please explain to me the difference between "carried forward" and "brought forward"? These terms come together in my translations and there must be some kind of subtle difference.

People with accounting experience, please... :-)

Thanks so much!
Teresa Duran-Sanchez
Spain
Local time: 21:09
carried forward from, brought forward to
Explanation:
Sorry, I'm not an experienced accountant, but as I understand these terms and use them for my personal accounts, where a column of figures is added up on one page to be transferred to another, the total at the bottom of the first page is marked "carried forward" and the total figure is put at the top of the next page and marked "brought forward". Sums can similarly be "carried forward" from one financial year, or month, etc., and "brought forward" to the next.
Selected response from:

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:09
Grading comment
Thanks, Jack, I suspected that's the difference and you've just confirmed it. At least in the context I am dealing with. Elena is wrong to think it's as simple as translate it for "traída" y "llevada" because we're talking accounting here! To word this in Spanish it's far more complicated. "Suma y sigue" or "a cuenta nueva" are possibilities, completely different! That's not the issue, anyway, I just wanted the opinion of a native speaker with practical experience and there you are! Thanks to the others too.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +9carried forward from, brought forward to
Jack Doughty
5 +1See examples below.
Sven Petersson
4 +2There is no difference
Steven Geller
5Carried forward, brought forward
Daniela Miklic Belancic


  

Answers


23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
carried forward from, brought forward to


Explanation:
Sorry, I'm not an experienced accountant, but as I understand these terms and use them for my personal accounts, where a column of figures is added up on one page to be transferred to another, the total at the bottom of the first page is marked "carried forward" and the total figure is put at the top of the next page and marked "brought forward". Sums can similarly be "carried forward" from one financial year, or month, etc., and "brought forward" to the next.

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thanks, Jack, I suspected that's the difference and you've just confirmed it. At least in the context I am dealing with. Elena is wrong to think it's as simple as translate it for "traída" y "llevada" because we're talking accounting here! To word this in Spanish it's far more complicated. "Suma y sigue" or "a cuenta nueva" are possibilities, completely different! That's not the issue, anyway, I just wanted the opinion of a native speaker with practical experience and there you are! Thanks to the others too.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kemal Mustajbegovic: That is the subtlety of translation. It may seem "same" but in the context there is a "difference".
27 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Margaret Lagoyianni
30 mins

agree  xxxElena Sgarbo: En español sería la diferencia entre "traída" y "llevada", aunque esta diferencia no siempre se mantenga en el inglés para otros usos de los verbos "carry" & "bring".
33 mins
  -> Gracias. He comprendido su español.

agree  Bill Greendyk: Excellent observation by Elena as well! Exactly like "traer" vs. "llevar."
43 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Paulo Celestino Guimaraes
48 mins

agree  MJ Barber: great explanation
48 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  edlih_be
1 hr

agree  Alaa Zeineldine
7 hrs

agree  Maria Knorr
9 hrs
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26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
There is no difference


Explanation:
"Carried forward" and "Brought forward" have the same meaning.

Regards,

Steven Geller
Local time: 21:09

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michael Sebold
4 mins

agree  Fuad Yahya
31 mins
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
See examples below.


Explanation:
Examples of use:

1. If a company has made a loss this year it can "carry forward" the loss to next year to offset it against next years profit.

2. If a company was planning a major investment next year but generated more profit this year than expected it could "bring forward" the investment to this year.




    My geriatric brain.
Sven Petersson
Sweden
Local time: 21:09
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lavinia Pirlog
3406 days
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Carried forward, brought forward


Explanation:
Bring forward:
1. To carry (a sum) from one page or column to another.
2. To bring forward the commencement date of a meeting

Carry forward:
1. A balance at year-end is carried forward into the new fiscal year
e.g. Budget savings will be carried forward in a lump sum as an addition to the current year budget
2.Up to 1994 the carry forward was defined as the budget minus actual. From 1995, the carry forward will be the resultant surplus or deficit after all income and expenditure items, asset additions and transfers to and from reserves have been brought to account.

Carry Forward = Income - (Expense + Additions - Depreciation)




    Reference: http://www.finance.usyd.edu.au/account/1401.htm
Daniela Miklic Belancic
Local time: 21:09
Native speaker of: Native in CroatianCroatian
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