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May I put the currency sign after the amount?

English translation: Place symbol before for the U.S., UK and English Canada

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:placement of the currency symbol
English translation:Place symbol before for the U.S., UK and English Canada
Entered by: RHELLER
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21:02 Jan 12, 2006
English to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Business/Commerce (general) / Placement of currency sign
English term or phrase: May I put the currency sign after the amount?
As far as I can tell, the placement of the currency sign/symbol (and the ISO 4217 code, e.g. "EUR") depends on the varies by currency (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Currency_sign ).

And apparently, most English-speaking countries place the currency sign before the amount, e.g. $450.50. The standardized European default placement, used in absence of a national standard, is that "€" is placed before the amount (see http://www.answers.com/topic/currency-sign ).

Even before I came to Germany and was exposed to placing the currency sign "DM" after the amount for the first time, I have always found that the placement before the amount just doesn't work as well with the rest of the punctuation. The amount I mentioned above is a perfect example: I think it just looks a bit strange to have the decimal and the period separated only by the numbers (it gets worse the higher the amount because of the commas).

I think it looks better following the amount, e.g. 1,250.03 $. What do you think? Does anyone have the 'definitive' rule handy?

Thanks for your help - I look forward to hearing your opinions.
:-)
Derek Gill Franßen
Germany
Local time: 21:52
not acceptable in the U.S.
Explanation:
-sorry

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Note added at 6 mins (2006-01-12 21:08:16 GMT)
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unless you are spelling out the word
1,000.00 dollars
Selected response from:

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 13:52
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +11not acceptable in the U.S.RHELLER
4 +9NO
Brie Vernier
5 +5English Canada before, French Canada after
NancyLynn
5 +3No
Elena Petelos
4 -2It depends on the currencyAnna Maria Augustine at proZ.com


Discussion entries: 8





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -2
may i put the currency sign after the amount?
It depends on the currency


Explanation:
*

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Note added at 5 mins (2006-01-12 21:07:37 GMT)
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$25.50 or 25.50 $

£25.50

50,00 €

The pound sign usually goes first. The dollar sign can be either because it is the sign which counts and the euro goes at the end.
Whatever is on a banknote will indicate the correct usage to you.

Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
France
Local time: 21:52
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Elena Petelos: The euro goes at the end?/In which style guide? Certainly not the EU one!
9 mins
  -> YES!!!!!!!!

disagree  Tony M: I think it's more to do with the language you are working in than the actual currency itself
37 mins

neutral  Martine Brault: In French the sign would go after, in English (as in this question) it goes before.
39 mins
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +11
may i put the currency sign after the amount?
not acceptable in the U.S.


Explanation:
-sorry

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 mins (2006-01-12 21:08:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

unless you are spelling out the word
1,000.00 dollars

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 13:52
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 71
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Elena Petelos: ;-) Happy New Year, you!
3 mins
  -> hny - thanks Elena :-)

agree  MultiPro
4 mins
  -> merci Multipro :-)

agree  Lori Dendy-Molz
7 mins
  -> merci, idwerk :-)

agree  Tony M: I think it's more to do with the language you are working in than the actual currency / Certainly NOT acceptable in the UK either
30 mins
  -> well, I'm glad you cleared that up :-)

agree  Martine Brault
35 mins
  -> merci traviata :-)

agree  PB Trans
57 mins
  -> Hi Pina :-)

agree  Enza Longo: Hi Rita - agree with Dusty that it depends on the language, English Canada definitely before, as for French Canada....vive la difference!
1 hr
  -> yes, wouldn't the world be a boring place if we all just...put our signs in the same place ? :-))

agree  NancyLynn
3 hrs

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
20 hrs

agree  Dave Calderhead: Yes - in financial reporting EUR 100 or USD 1 million, or 100 euros or one million dollars
1 day2 hrs

agree  Joanna Borowska
2 days23 hrs
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
may i put the currency sign after the amount?
English Canada before, French Canada after


Explanation:
French Canada has modeled itself after France in this case, and in my mind it always makes sense: after all, in speech we say the word "dollar" after the amount, not before, right? But the Globe & Mail will write it thusly: $100.00, and Le Droit will have it as 100,00 $.

HTH

NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 15:52
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Martine Brault: and with an unbreakable space between the value and the sign, so that they do not get separated :o).
35 mins
  -> exactly, thanks trav!

agree  Enza Longo
1 hr
  -> thanks Enza

agree  Sophia Finos
3 hrs

agree  Yavor Dimitrov
23 hrs

agree  Cristina Chaplin
23 hrs
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
may i put the currency sign after the amount?
NO


Explanation:
Not in English, Derek. Even when you have e.g. $1,250.03, if you read it out loud, you say the 'dollars' in the middle, i.e. before the 'and three cents' -- so would you propose putting the dollar sign in place of the decimal? I don't think so : )

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Note added at 15 mins (2006-01-12 21:17:14 GMT)
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Of course, if you're using the "cent" sign, say for 'my two cents' (2¢), it conveniently comes after the number. Same for British pence -- 50P.

See also Wikipedia:

Good style

* NZ$100,000
* AU$100,000
* US$100 million
* GBP 100,000
* 2000 Chinese renminbi
* Two thousand Chinese renminbi

[edit]

Bad style

* $190 — This can lead to ambiguity in non-country specific articles as to which dollar is meant.
* $100 — this is hard to read
* 100$ — Although it is read like this, it is not a standard way to write it. Dollars are sometimes written this way by Canadian francophones writing in English. This is also the way Portuguese escudos were expressed prior to the euro being introduced.
* $200 (US)
* $US200

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Naming_conventions_(c...

Brie Vernier
Germany
Local time: 21:52
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: I get what you are saying, Brie. But it not so much the disparity between how it sounds and how it is written. I don't like how it LOOKS (particularly at the end of a sentence). ;-)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lori Dendy-Molz: Same deal with euros: the way it's read out loud doesn't correspond to how it's written, so it's best to stick to accepted style.
8 mins
  -> Yes, thanks Lori

agree  Tony M: Excellent explanation! /// Well, it USED to be common in the UK, but seems to be out of favour now! I guess you're all too young to remember :-)))
31 mins
  -> Thanks, Dusty - can't agree with your "centre-line decimal point" argument, though -- I have Never seen this usage in American English.//Yep, that's me, just a young'un : )

agree  Robert Kleemaier
36 mins
  -> Thanks, Robert

agree  Enza Longo
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Enza

agree  pidzej: in fact the Portuguese escudo did, and Chile's peso does use the $ sign in lieu of the usual separator: 480$00 , so its neither before not after the amount!//would've thought "agree" says it all, rest is exciting useless info
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Pidzej -- but the question is about English usage, isn't it?//Sorry, Pidzej, of course it does/is. I just don't think that English is likely to ever "copy" the convention.

agree  cmwilliams
1 hr
  -> Thanks, cm

agree  Cilian O'Tuama: I've never heard of the centre-line d.p. either, so hey...
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Cilian ... so you must be a young'un, too!

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
20 hrs
  -> Thanks, Marju

agree  Joanna Borowska
2 days23 hrs
  -> Thanks, ryfka
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
may i put the currency sign after the amount?
No


Explanation:
For the EU, the Interinstitutional Style Guide states:
The currency abbreviation precedes the amount and is followed by a space.

http://europa.eu.int/comm/translation/writing/style_guides/e...

However, currency symbols* are closed up.

As for the US, I believe the same rule applies.

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Note added at 31 mins (2006-01-12 21:33:28 GMT)
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https://www.sla.org/PDFs/SLAStyleGuide.pdf
I'm afraid the GPO agrees with the EU, Derek.
http://www.gpoaccess.gov/stylemanual/

Elena Petelos
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:52
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
Notes to answerer
Asker: It does look that way, doesn't it? Well, it was worth a try. ;-)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Martine Brault
32 mins
  -> Thanks!

agree  Tony M: That's always been my observation too; even here in France, things like cheque books etc. are often pre-printed with the € symbol in front
33 mins
  -> Indeed! (Best wishes for 2006, Dusty!) :)

agree  cmwilliams
1 hr
  -> Thanks!
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