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living out that bag

English translation: surviving on what he had in that bag

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:living out that bag
English translation:surviving on what he had in that bag
Entered by: Charles Davis
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00:10 Apr 16, 2012
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Cinema, Film, TV, Drama
English term or phrase: living out that bag
Hello everyone,

Lt. Lowell McGee
He was very nervous, wouldn’t look us in the eye and we ask him if he had lost a bag and he confirmed that he did lose… did have a bag, a tote bag.
NARRATOR
WOLOSON CLAIMS HE LEFT THE BAG IN THE FIELD A FEW DAYS EARLIER. THIS DOWN-ON-HIS-LUCK EX-CONVICT CLAIMS HE’D BEEN LIVING UNDER A BRIDGE IN THE WOODS ONE-AND-A-HALF KILOMETRES FROM THE
CRIME SCENE.
Lt. Lowell McGee
He said he left the bag there because he didn’t want the people he worked with to know that he’d been kicked out the motel and that he was more or less living out that bag.

Thank you.
klp
Local time: 01:25
surviving on what he had in that bag
Explanation:
Or using what he had in that bag to sustain him. I think it means "living out of that bag"; "out" for "out of" is sometimes used colloquially.

It implies that he was living very frugally, on very limited resources, keeping himself going with what he had in the bag, whether that was food and drink, clothing, or whatever.

A common expression of a similar kind is "living out of a suitcase":



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Note added at 7 mins (2012-04-16 00:18:25 GMT)
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(Here we are again, Lorena!)

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Note added at 11 mins (2012-04-16 00:21:54 GMT)
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"live out of. Lead a lifestyle characterized by a particular item. This phrase appears in such idioms as live out of a suitcase, meaning “to travel so much that one has no time to unpack one's belongings,” or live out of cans, meaning “to eat only canned food for lack of other foods or time to prepare them.” For example, Traveling for months on end, he got very tired of living out of a suitcase, or We had neither gas nor electricity for a week and had to live out of cans."


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Note added at 11 mins (2012-04-16 00:22:25 GMT)
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Reference for this quotation: http://idioms.yourdictionary.com/live-out
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 22:25
Grading comment
Thank you, Charles!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +9surviving on what he had in that bag
Charles Davis


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
surviving on what he had in that bag


Explanation:
Or using what he had in that bag to sustain him. I think it means "living out of that bag"; "out" for "out of" is sometimes used colloquially.

It implies that he was living very frugally, on very limited resources, keeping himself going with what he had in the bag, whether that was food and drink, clothing, or whatever.

A common expression of a similar kind is "living out of a suitcase":



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 mins (2012-04-16 00:18:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

(Here we are again, Lorena!)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2012-04-16 00:21:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"live out of. Lead a lifestyle characterized by a particular item. This phrase appears in such idioms as live out of a suitcase, meaning “to travel so much that one has no time to unpack one's belongings,” or live out of cans, meaning “to eat only canned food for lack of other foods or time to prepare them.” For example, Traveling for months on end, he got very tired of living out of a suitcase, or We had neither gas nor electricity for a week and had to live out of cans."


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Note added at 11 mins (2012-04-16 00:22:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Reference for this quotation: http://idioms.yourdictionary.com/live-out

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 22:25
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
Thank you, Charles!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  lorenab23: ha,ha,ha!!!
1 min
  -> :-)

agree  Jenna Porter-Jacek
9 mins
  -> Thanks, Jenna!

agree  Jack Doughty
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, Jack!

agree  Thayenga: Or as the Germans say: from your hand into your mouth. :)
8 hrs
  -> That's right! And in English, "from hand to mouth"; it's a good equivalent. Thanks, Thayenga :)

agree  Gert Sass (M.A.)
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Gert!

agree  LisaV20
11 hrs
  -> Thanks, Lisa!

agree  NancyLynn
11 hrs
  -> Thanks, Nancy!

agree  Simon Mac
11 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  Colin Rowe
13 hrs
  -> Thanks, Colin!
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Changes made by editors
Apr 17, 2012 - Changes made by Charles Davis:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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