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bye and goodbye

English translation: no difference in meaning

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11:04 Apr 7, 2004
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / etiquettes
English term or phrase: bye and goodbye
I would be grateful if native speakers could apprise me of basic difference between bye and goodbye. Should we bid goodbye to a person whom we are not expected to meet in future? Likewise, should we bid bye to a person whom we'll be meeting (most probably) the next days.

I hope that you would throw light on the difference between these expressions through some examples.
Mamta
English translation:no difference in meaning
Explanation:
Bye is simple a short form of goodbye. Bye-bye is another variant.
Bye and bye-bye are less formal than goodbye.

Business people and older people will say 'goodbye' when they leave.
Young people and friends are more likely to use the short, informal form.

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Note added at 18 mins (2004-04-07 11:22:08 GMT)
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As Ian pointed out, you can only use the formal, long form \'goodbye\' in the combination \'to bid (someone) goodbye\'.

Other examples:
\'They said their goodbyes\'
\'Hellos and goodbyes\'

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Note added at 23 mins (2004-04-07 11:27:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Typo: Bye is simplY...
Selected response from:

vixen
Local time: 13:18
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +17no difference in meaning
vixen
4 +4no difference but ...xxxIanW
5Avoid using these terms in business
ARTES


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
no difference but ...


Explanation:
As far as I know, there is no difference between "bye" and "goodbye" but you can't say "to bid bye".

xxxIanW
Local time: 12:18
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
1 min

agree  Kim Metzger: Do we still say farewell?
2 mins

agree  Özden Arıkan
1 hr

agree  GoodWords: Mamta, regarding your question, "Likewise, should we bid bye to a person whom we'll be meeting (most probably) the next days?" It would be perfectly natural to say informally, "Bye for now, see you tomorrow."
9 hrs
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +17
no difference in meaning


Explanation:
Bye is simple a short form of goodbye. Bye-bye is another variant.
Bye and bye-bye are less formal than goodbye.

Business people and older people will say 'goodbye' when they leave.
Young people and friends are more likely to use the short, informal form.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 mins (2004-04-07 11:22:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As Ian pointed out, you can only use the formal, long form \'goodbye\' in the combination \'to bid (someone) goodbye\'.

Other examples:
\'They said their goodbyes\'
\'Hellos and goodbyes\'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 23 mins (2004-04-07 11:27:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Typo: Bye is simplY...

vixen
Local time: 13:18
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  lindaellen
9 mins

agree  Nikita Kobrin
12 mins

agree  Craft.Content
14 mins

agree  Marian Greenfield: nice explanation
23 mins
  -> thanks, Marian

agree  cmwilliams: yes, although they basically have the same meaning, the difference in formality is very important.
46 mins
  -> Absolutely. Thanks.

agree  Kornelia Longoria
1 hr

agree  Özden Arıkan
1 hr

agree  Hacene
1 hr

agree  Michele Johnson
1 hr

agree  elenus: no difference except formality.
2 hrs

agree  mbc
2 hrs

agree  Asghar Bhatti
2 hrs

agree  RHELLER: question of formal versus more casual speech
4 hrs

agree  Lesley Clayton
4 hrs

agree  GoodWords
9 hrs

agree  Armorel Young: both originate from "God be with you" (a bit like French adieu) so have nothing to do with whether you expect to see the person again or not
10 hrs
  -> You're absolutely right. Thanks, Armorel.

agree  Mario Marcolin: "Goodbye" is also abstract: "'They said their goodbyes" does not necessarily imply that they used the word "goodbye" :)
3 days59 mins
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Avoid using these terms in business


Explanation:
In a business letter, never use the term "goodbye" because it indicates a feeling of not wanting to do business with that person or company in the future. Instead use positive terms like "we look forward to your response", or "Thank you for your consideration", or "Have a great weekend". If you know someone personally and have a strong relationship with them, then using the term "bye" is ok...but only if you are very confident that the relationship is strong. The term "bye" can have negative emotions attached to it, if your relationship is weak, or if it is used in the wrong place in a conversation.

For example, if you've just had a "difference of opinion" with a potential client or employer, make sure to do something positive to strengthen the relationship first, before using the term "bye", if you use it at all.

Just remember this basic rule of thumb:

"Goodbye" is very strongly negative and implies permanence
"bye" is less negative and can be used in strong relationships
always try to use more posittive closes for all business letters!

Sincerely,

Arthur


ARTES
Local time: 03:18
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxIanW: I agree that "bye" shouldn't be used in a business contest, but not that it implies permanence. People use it every day when talking to people they see every day
13 hrs

neutral  vixen: There's nothing negative or permanent about saying goodbye to your neighbour or your colleague. Native speakers will never use 'goodbye' to end a letter. (With) kind regards, best regards etc. are a few of the common terms used in writing.
15 hrs
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