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Rise (up) to the challenge

English translation: I don't think it means anything, it's just wrong.

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12:38 Feb 6, 2009
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Idioms / Maxims / Sayings / English expression
English term or phrase: Rise (up) to the challenge
Hitherto I've never ever stumbled upon a single dictionary showing it with this "up", which time and again comes in speech. Does it impart some significant change in the meaning, or is it just our good old "emphatic up" here? E.g. She rose (up) to the challenge and wowed the audience with a unprecedented performace.
FNO
English translation:I don't think it means anything, it's just wrong.
Explanation:
Rising means upwards. How could you rise down to a challenge, or descend up to one?
Selected response from:

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:34
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6I don't think it means anything, it's just wrong.
Jack Doughty
4 +1to face the challengeEllen Kraus


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
rise (up) to the challenge
I don't think it means anything, it's just wrong.


Explanation:
Rising means upwards. How could you rise down to a challenge, or descend up to one?

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:34
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 80
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Suzan Hamer: Right, Jack. Even a contortionist could not rise down . . . and with Ken's explanations in the discussion area.
35 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Sabina Metcalf
38 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Tina Vonhof
45 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Sheila Wilson: as Ken says, "to be up to the challenge" but "to rise to ..." - but it IS used
48 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Armorel Young: Yes, you rise to the challenge, rise to the occasion, rise from the ashes, rise to the bait - never with up
49 mins
  -> Thank you. To rise up in revolt (i.e. in an uprising!) is possible, but it's wrong in this context.

agree  NancyLynn
1 hr
  -> Thank you.
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
rise (up) to the challenge
to face the challenge


Explanation:
she had the courage to face the challenge (and won)

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Note added at 16 Min. (2009-02-06 12:54:49 GMT)
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the <up> is absolutely redundant, as Jack already observed

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Note added at 17 Min. (2009-02-06 12:55:45 GMT)
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it should of course read: the <up> is .....

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Note added at 17 Min. (2009-02-06 12:56:18 GMT)
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the <up>

Ellen Kraus
Austria
Local time: 08:34
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sheila Wilson: or you could say "face up to the challenge"! ;-)
46 mins
  -> thank you !
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