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To all whom these presents shall come, greeting

English translation: Greetings to all those who receive this document / To whom it may concern

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:To all whom these presents shall come, greeting
English translation:Greetings to all those who receive this document / To whom it may concern
Entered by: Charles Davis
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07:07 Mar 7, 2012
English to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general) / Certificate of legal status
English term or phrase: To all whom these presents shall come, greeting
http://www.recorded2477roads.utah.gov/carbon/b-roads/preamen...
Andrei Vrabtchev
Bulgaria
Local time: 00:30
greetings to all those who receive this document
Explanation:
That is more or less the literal meaning in plain English. In practice, as aricb says, it is equivalent in meaning to a formula such as "to whom it may concern", and indicates that the document is addressed not to a specific person or persons but to anyone affected by what the document says.

This formula has been used for centuries in English at the beginning of deeds and other legal documents. It is formal and archaic, and is normally a sign that what follows is legally important and binding.

As aricb says, the grammatically correct form would be "to all to whom these presents shall come", but the form you have quoted, without the second "to", is very common indeed.

"Presents" is a legal usage, not current in any other context in modern English. It is related to the formal but still current use of "present" as an adjective in "the present document", ie. "this document":

"presents [ˈprɛzənts]
pl n
(Law) Law used in a deed or document to refer to itself
know all men by these presents"
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/presents

"Greeting", in the singular, is also somewhat unusual in ordinary modern English; nowadays we would normally use it in the plural: "greetings".

This formula originated in England, and is still in use in deeds in the UK, but it is also standard in legal documents in the US.



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Note added at 1 hr (2012-03-07 09:01:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Another detail which would not normally be expressed the same way in ordinary modern English is "shall come", in the future tense; we would normally use the present nowadays, with future sense.

For the purpose of translating this, what is needed is a formula in the target language that is equivalent in meaning and is commonly used at the beginning of similar documents. This particular formula occurs at the beginning of royal charters (formal foundational documents of institutions, issued by the monarch), and various legislative and constitutional documents in the US. Deeds, powers of attorney, and so on, usually begin with a similar but slightly different version: "Know all men by these presents."
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 23:30
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2greetings to all those who receive this document
Charles Davis
1hi all ;-]
airmailrpl


Discussion entries: 8





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
to all whom these presents shall come, greeting
greetings to all those who receive this document


Explanation:
That is more or less the literal meaning in plain English. In practice, as aricb says, it is equivalent in meaning to a formula such as "to whom it may concern", and indicates that the document is addressed not to a specific person or persons but to anyone affected by what the document says.

This formula has been used for centuries in English at the beginning of deeds and other legal documents. It is formal and archaic, and is normally a sign that what follows is legally important and binding.

As aricb says, the grammatically correct form would be "to all to whom these presents shall come", but the form you have quoted, without the second "to", is very common indeed.

"Presents" is a legal usage, not current in any other context in modern English. It is related to the formal but still current use of "present" as an adjective in "the present document", ie. "this document":

"presents [ˈprɛzənts]
pl n
(Law) Law used in a deed or document to refer to itself
know all men by these presents"
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/presents

"Greeting", in the singular, is also somewhat unusual in ordinary modern English; nowadays we would normally use it in the plural: "greetings".

This formula originated in England, and is still in use in deeds in the UK, but it is also standard in legal documents in the US.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2012-03-07 09:01:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Another detail which would not normally be expressed the same way in ordinary modern English is "shall come", in the future tense; we would normally use the present nowadays, with future sense.

For the purpose of translating this, what is needed is a formula in the target language that is equivalent in meaning and is commonly used at the beginning of similar documents. This particular formula occurs at the beginning of royal charters (formal foundational documents of institutions, issued by the monarch), and various legislative and constitutional documents in the US. Deeds, powers of attorney, and so on, usually begin with a similar but slightly different version: "Know all men by these presents."

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 23:30
Meets criteria
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 84
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Armorel Young: Very well put
44 mins
  -> Thanks very much, Armorel!

disagree  MARK ROBERTSON: interesting but aricb has the answer.
3 hrs
  -> Can you explain to me how my answer conflicts with what aricb has said, and what it is that you disagree with here? Please see my discussion comment.

agree  AllegroTrans
4 hrs
  -> Many thanks, Allegro

agree  Veronika McLaren
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Veronika!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
to all whom these presents shall come, greeting
hi all ;-]


Explanation:
to all whom these presents shall come, greeting => to all whom these presents shall come, greeting

airmailrpl
Brazil
Local time: 18:30
Meets criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 28
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Changes made by editors
Mar 21, 2012 - Changes made by Charles Davis:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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