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index by / according to / of ...?

English translation: the GI index of X and Y, or the X and Y GI index

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20:00 Feb 7, 2009
English to English translations [PRO]
Science - Linguistics / dentistry
English term or phrase: index by / according to / of ...?
The Gingival Index (GI) was developed by Loe and Silness.

As I need to refer to various dental indices all the time in my article, what is the best short version ?

eg. the GI index by X and Y
the GI index of X and Y
the GI index according to X and Y
the X and Y GI index
the GI index( X and Y)

I've seen them all, but some in non-native English texts ...
Allda
Local time: 22:41
English translation:the GI index of X and Y, or the X and Y GI index
Explanation:
I'd only use these one or other of these two given that the index is a form of scientific finding or discovery. Most usual EN phrasing.

"by" would be more an author refence ,
"according to" gives the impression of more than one version of the index, whereas an index is more definitive.

(x and y) in brackets after a citation would be more commonly used for shorthand to refer to an article/book written by x and y

so I'd stick to your b) or d) for ease and precision (plus it has most Ghits!)


hope this helps!
Selected response from:

xxxArabellaCE
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:41
Grading comment
Thank you very much. All three answers have been very helpful. :-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3the GI index of X and Y, or the X and Y GI indexxxxArabellaCE
4 +2they're all correct (read note below)
Laurie Price
4 +1LSGI
Suzan Hamer


  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
they're all correct (read note below)


Explanation:
depending on the specific context, except they need to be cleaned up (delete &/or insert spaces). I'd suggest that you don't use only one of these for all mentions in the document.

Laurie Price
Mexico
Works in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sheila Wilson: I agree that if there are repeated references, then it's best to vary the expression used - they are all valid
1 hr
  -> thanks Sheila, Q closed & someone else's answer was chosen

agree  Gary D: Agree, you are lucky as you have so many correct ways to choose from. you just have to fit the correct one for "by" and "of"in with your statement
1 hr
  -> Q closed & someone else's answer was chosen, but thanks Gary
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
the GI index of X and Y, or the X and Y GI index


Explanation:
I'd only use these one or other of these two given that the index is a form of scientific finding or discovery. Most usual EN phrasing.

"by" would be more an author refence ,
"according to" gives the impression of more than one version of the index, whereas an index is more definitive.

(x and y) in brackets after a citation would be more commonly used for shorthand to refer to an article/book written by x and y

so I'd stick to your b) or d) for ease and precision (plus it has most Ghits!)


hope this helps!

xxxArabellaCE
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:41
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you very much. All three answers have been very helpful. :-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Anton Baer: The fifth is the best: GI index (X and Y). No. 3 ('according to') is a no-no.
58 mins

agree  B D Finch
1 hr

agree  NancyLynn: with HeinrichB re. 3 too
2 hrs
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
LSGI


Explanation:
The most concise is "the Loe and Silness Gingival Index." I see no reason why you can't, at the first mention of it, give the complete name followed by (LSGI) and thereafter use LSGI; googling supports this use.

"Gingivitis was evaluated using the LSGI . . . "
linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0300571205800041

"In 15 trials plaque was scored using the Quigley–Hein plaque index (QHPI)and gingivitis by the Loe and Silness gingival index (LSGI). ..."
www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1600-051X.2004.... -

Suzan Hamer
Netherlands
Local time: 22:41
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  B D Finch: Supporting the avoidance of excess and redundant verbiage.
11 hrs
  -> Thank you, BD. Down with verbiage!
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