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Pattern: Come + ing form of the verb + adv (e.g. down)

English translation: Yes, standard English

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12:13 Feb 13, 2009
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Linguistics / English usages
English term or phrase: Pattern: Come + ing form of the verb + adv (e.g. down)
(Depeche Mode) ... words come crashing in ...
(Style Council) walls come tumbling down...

I assume the phrasals here are "come down" and "come in", and that "crash" and "tumble" describe the mode in which the actions took place; for "ing", well, they sort of highlight an idea that the events developed by the mentioned means until their conclusion. Am I right in my opinion? Does any dictionary explain this? Is this real standard English? More examples?
FNO
English translation:Yes, standard English
Explanation:
I can't answer all the interesting points you raise, but I can confirm that (certainly to me as a BE speaker) this construction is entirely standard and acceptable English.

A few more examples:
After the fire, offers of help came pouring in.
During the storm the water came flooding in.

It seems to me (although I can't back this up from any grammar book) that the basic verb is, for example,"pour in", because we could easily say "After the fire, offers of help poured in", but by expanding it with the "come" construction ("came pouring in") we emphasise the strength of the event and the fact that it continues over a period of time. "The walls came tumbling down" is more vivid and exciting than the rather bald "The walls tumbled down".

Selected response from:

Armorel Young
Local time: 18:48
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +9Yes, standard English
Armorel Young


  

Answers


29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +9
pattern: come + ing form of the verb + adv (e.g. down)
Yes, standard English


Explanation:
I can't answer all the interesting points you raise, but I can confirm that (certainly to me as a BE speaker) this construction is entirely standard and acceptable English.

A few more examples:
After the fire, offers of help came pouring in.
During the storm the water came flooding in.

It seems to me (although I can't back this up from any grammar book) that the basic verb is, for example,"pour in", because we could easily say "After the fire, offers of help poured in", but by expanding it with the "come" construction ("came pouring in") we emphasise the strength of the event and the fact that it continues over a period of time. "The walls came tumbling down" is more vivid and exciting than the rather bald "The walls tumbled down".



Armorel Young
Local time: 18:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Trudy Peters
24 mins

agree  Alice Bootman: Yes, absolutely. Also for US English.
37 mins

agree  Sheila Wilson: It really helps to bring alive the action - much stronger
50 mins

agree  Marie Scarano
57 mins

agree  Elena Aleksandrova
1 hr

agree  Ken Cox: absolutely, and in terms of grammatical analysis, 'came' is probably a modal verb or similar to a modal verb (and I personally belong to the descriptive grammar school: you can't learn to speak a language by studying its grammar)
1 hr

agree  Rachel Fell
2 hrs

agree  Melanie Nassar : Not to forget Johnny who comes marching home or the saints who GO marching in
2 hrs

agree  Patricia Townshend
4 hrs
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