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cellulitis vs. phlegmon

English translation: in this context, the same

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00:15 Dec 25, 2009
English to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general)
English term or phrase: cellulitis vs. phlegmon
Can they be used interchangeably? I am proofreading and the translator uses the two terms interchangeably ( she translated cellulitis from another language as phlegmon).
I fear that it is not medically correct to use them interchangeably.

Senior MDs [any dermatologists out there?] especially welcome to comment.Thanks a lot!
lirka
Austria
Local time: 06:07
English translation:in this context, the same
Explanation:
Both words mean "a diffuse inflammation of the skin and subcutaneous tissue due to infection", usually with Gram-positive bacteria. Most scholarly sources now use the two interchangeably, as a quick search of PubMed will show. "Phlegmon" is a rather outdated term, originally used as a counterpoint to "abscess".

Here is the definition of cellulitis from Bolognia's Dermatology, a standard textbook: "Cellulitis is an infection of the deep dermis and subcutaneous tissue caused most commonly by Str. pyogenes and S. aureus".

A distinction between "cellulitis" and "phlegmon" in a dermatology setting did originally exist, with "phlegmon" sometimes considered the outcome of cellulitis, but this distinction has been lost at least since the 1900s, as suggested in this 1935 article (sadly in Portuguese!).
http://www.rborl.org.br/conteudo/acervo/print_acervo.asp?id=...

There may still be a distinction in other contexts, but if we're talking about soft tissue infection, I see no problem in using both interchangeably, although I see absolutely no reason to translate "cellulitis" as "phlegmon" when the former is much more widely used and understood in English!
Selected response from:

fvasconcellos
Brazil
Local time: 01:07
Grading comment
Thanks!
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4in this context, the samefvasconcellos
4not the sameConstantinos Faridis
Summary of reference entries provided
The same
Tina Vonhof

Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
in this context, the same


Explanation:
Both words mean "a diffuse inflammation of the skin and subcutaneous tissue due to infection", usually with Gram-positive bacteria. Most scholarly sources now use the two interchangeably, as a quick search of PubMed will show. "Phlegmon" is a rather outdated term, originally used as a counterpoint to "abscess".

Here is the definition of cellulitis from Bolognia's Dermatology, a standard textbook: "Cellulitis is an infection of the deep dermis and subcutaneous tissue caused most commonly by Str. pyogenes and S. aureus".

A distinction between "cellulitis" and "phlegmon" in a dermatology setting did originally exist, with "phlegmon" sometimes considered the outcome of cellulitis, but this distinction has been lost at least since the 1900s, as suggested in this 1935 article (sadly in Portuguese!).
http://www.rborl.org.br/conteudo/acervo/print_acervo.asp?id=...

There may still be a distinction in other contexts, but if we're talking about soft tissue infection, I see no problem in using both interchangeably, although I see absolutely no reason to translate "cellulitis" as "phlegmon" when the former is much more widely used and understood in English!

fvasconcellos
Brazil
Local time: 01:07
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 35
Grading comment
Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michael Barnett: I think you've summed things up very nicely. "Phlegmon" is a somewhat archaic term that is essentially synonymous with cellulitis.
3 hrs
  -> Thank you, Michael; "essentially synonymous" is exactly what I was going for. Merry Christmas!

agree  Tina Vonhof
3 hrs
  -> Thank you, Tina! Merry Christmas!

agree  Goldcoaster
22 hrs
  -> Thank you! Happy holidays!

agree  George Colibaba
3 days4 hrs
  -> Thank you!
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
not the same


Explanation:
Overview: The word cellulitis literally means inflammation of the cells. It generally indicates an acute spreading infection of the dermis ...
emedicine.medscape.com/.../781412-overview
Phlegmon affecting the spine is known as spondylodiskitis and is associated with loss of disk height and endplate destruction. In adults, the bone marrow is ...

Etiology - Classifications - Clinical pictures - Diagnostics
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phlegmon - Προσωρινά αποθηκευμένη - Παρόμοιεςphlegmon - definition of phlegmon in the Medical dictionary - by ... - [ Μετάφραση αυτής της σελίδας ]
phlegmon /phleg·mon/ (fleg´mon) diffuse inflammation of the soft or connective tissue due to infection.phleg´monous. phleg·mon (fl g m n ) ...
medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/phlegmon

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Note added at 8 ημέρες (2010-01-02 09:00:18 GMT) Post-grading
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in all contexts is not the same. cellulitis<cellula and inflammation<flamma

Constantinos Faridis
Greece
Local time: 07:07
Native speaker of: Greek
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Reference comments


4 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: The same

Reference information:
It appears that they are the same:


http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?cellulitis

http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?phlegmon

http://www.find-health-articles.com/msh-cellulitis.htm

Tina Vonhof
Canada
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  fvasconcellos
8 hrs
  -> Thank you.
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