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dissed

English translation: insult, contempt, treat with disrespect

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20:23 Oct 29, 2005
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Other
English term or phrase: dissed
past tense of dis
Maria Diogo
English translation:insult, contempt, treat with disrespect
Explanation:
dis // v. & n. (also diss) US slang
v.tr. (dissed, dissing) put a person down; bad-mouth.
n. disrespect.
[abbreviation of disrespect]

OXFORD CONCISE DICTIONARY

Main Entry:dis
Pronunciation:*dis
Function:transitive verb
Inflected Form:dissed ; dissing
Etymology:perhaps short for disrespect
Date:1986

1 slang : to treat with disrespect or contempt : INSULT
2 slang : to find fault with : CRITICIZE

MERRIAM-WEBSTER'S COLLEGIATE DICTIONARY
Selected response from:

Vicky Papaprodromou
Local time: 03:42
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.



Summary of answers provided
5 +12insult, contempt, treat with disrespectVicky Papaprodromou
4 +2disconnected
Tony M
4 +1disparaged
Michael Barnett


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +12
insult, contempt, treat with disrespect


Explanation:
dis // v. & n. (also diss) US slang
v.tr. (dissed, dissing) put a person down; bad-mouth.
n. disrespect.
[abbreviation of disrespect]

OXFORD CONCISE DICTIONARY

Main Entry:dis
Pronunciation:*dis
Function:transitive verb
Inflected Form:dissed ; dissing
Etymology:perhaps short for disrespect
Date:1986

1 slang : to treat with disrespect or contempt : INSULT
2 slang : to find fault with : CRITICIZE

MERRIAM-WEBSTER'S COLLEGIATE DICTIONARY

Vicky Papaprodromou
Local time: 03:42
Works in field
Native speaker of: Greek
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Daniel Bird
2 mins
  -> Thanks, Daniel!

agree  Dave Calderhead
16 mins
  -> Thanks, Dave!

agree  Nick Lingris
17 mins
  -> Thanks, Nick!

agree  Jack Doughty
28 mins
  -> Thanks, Jack!

agree  Enza Longo
39 mins
  -> Thanks, Enza!

agree  Will Matter: Comes from English "disrespect, to disrespect". American ghetto slang.
2 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  Refugio: disrespected...and it's mainstream American slang now, not "ghetto"
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Ruth!

agree  transparx: for many people, "dis" is disrepect & dishonor (though it does derive from "disrepect") ...must agree with Ruth --it's mainstream American slang
3 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  airmailrpl: treat with disrespect
5 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  RHELLER: past tense
9 hrs
  -> Thanks, Rita!

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
15 hrs
  -> Thanks, Marju!

agree  KNielsen
1 day3 hrs
  -> Thank you so much!

neutral  Mike Delta : Where I come from, dissed a meaningless "justification" for mindless violence that the utterer's peer group accept without question. Much in vogue with minority groups since it immediately guarantees them police protection under the Race Relations Act..
79 days
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
disconnected


Explanation:
In a completely different context, I'd just like to record the fact that in informal technical jargon, this word is often used as a shortened form of 'disconnect(ed)':

"The power should be dissed before opening the box"

That's why it's so important for you to give us the CONTEXT!

Tony M
France
Local time: 02:42
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 124

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Will Matter: Maybe, but the original and most common meaning is "to disrespect". Usage: "Yo, he dissed me and my peeps". Trust me Dusty, this is American slang.
2 hrs
  -> But I DO trust you, W/m! But please trust me too: this is also perfectly valid UK slang/jargon, predating the US usage, I think, and as Asker hasn't seen fit to give us the slightest context, we don't even know which side of the Pond this is...

agree  juvera: But you are right, this is also a perfectly valid usage, so it should be mentioned.
3 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot, Juvera! You've seen my point... :-)

agree  transparx: indeed, "dis" can be any "dis..." --an interesting case of ellipsis at the morphological level more than a mere abbreviation --the meaning is recovered from the context
3 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot, Nino! Interesting, indeed, as you say...
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33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
disparaged


Explanation:
I usually see the word in the context of a negative review or critique of a theatrical performance.

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Note added at 3 hrs 58 mins (2005-10-30 00:21:52 GMT)
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http://www.sciamdigital.com/browse.cfm?ITEMIDCHAR=2DDAC3BD-2...

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Note added at 4 hrs 2 mins (2005-10-30 00:26:05 GMT)
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Another discussion of "dis".
http://www.wordwizard.com/ch_forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=18384&...


    Reference: http://burnedbythesun.blogspot.com/2004_06_01_burnedbythesun...
Michael Barnett
Local time: 20:42
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Will Matter: May have become more "highbrow" by becoming associated with "disparaged" vs. "disrespected" (probably a case of "back-formation") but the original usage & origin, in American English, is from "disrespect". Don't worry, i'm not dissing your answer. ;0)
2 hrs
  -> The crowd knows best. ;-) See reference above.

agree  transparx: see my comment to Dusty's answer. Very interesting reference. I had never seen it used this way, but it makes a lot of sense. One could even claim then that it's becoming a sort of negative placeholder. very interesting!
3 hrs
  -> Thanks Nino! Interesting comment. ;-)
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