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inappropriacy

English translation: an inappropriate use of a word or an expression

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:an inappropriacy
English translation:an inappropriate use of a word or an expression
Entered by: R. A. Stegemann
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04:01 Jul 30, 2003
English to English translations [PRO]
/ symantics
English term or phrase: inappropriacy
Have my twelve years in East Asia made my correctness with regard to the English language obsolete, or is this a British invention?

I only know the word in the following forms: inappropriate as opposed to appropriate (adjective), and inappropriateness as opposed to appropriateness (noun).

I found the word "inappropriacies" on the IELTS website by the way.
R. A. Stegemann
Saudi Arabia
Local time: 23:04
inappropriateness is more "appropriate"
Explanation:
Bartleby has no entry for inappropriacy

inappropriateness. Roget s II: The New Thesaurus, Third Edition. 1995.
...The condition of being improper: improperness, impropriety, unbecomingness, unfitness, unseemliness, unsuitability, unsuitableness. See AGREE, USUAL


unsuitability. Roget s II: The New Thesaurus, Third Edition. 1995.
...The condition of being improper: improperness, impropriety, inappropriateness, unbecomingness, unfitness, unseemliness, unsuitableness. See AGREE, USUAL....


9) improperness. Roget s II: The New Thesaurus, Third Edition. 1995.
...The condition of being improper: impropriety, inappropriateness, unbecomingness, unfitness, unseemliness, unsuitability, unsuitableness. See AGREE, USUAL....


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Note added at 1 day 55 mins (2003-07-31 04:56:47 GMT)
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I agree with all of you that it is sometimes used. I admit it sounds odd to me so I would prefer to use inappropriateness or maybe even unsuitability.

http://www.teflfarm.com/teachers/articles/0/coarse.htm
a site where this term is used to describe the sensitivity of discussions on sex, alcohol and cigarettes in the schools; an \"appropriate\" use, I would think :-)
Selected response from:

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 08:04
Grading comment
I have awarded Rita my points, because she has struck closest to my heart with regard to the point of my question and the discussion that followed. I also found Mario's research most helpful. Obviously Fuad has correctly captured the IELTS' use of the word in a very concise way.

In closing it seems an inappropriacy that those who invent new words or new uses for old words do not provide at least an explanation for their deviation. Soon I suppose the IELTS will be claiming poetic license.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +4It´s a word, at least in Brit. EnglishChris Rowson
3 +4I'm not familiar with this form either, but it seems reasonable, by analogy to 'immediacy' which...
DGK T-I
5context
Mario Marcolin
3 +1inappropriateness is more "appropriate"RHELLER
3Prior to this question, I was not aware of "inappropriacy."Fuad Yahya


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
I'm not familiar with this form either, but it seems reasonable, by analogy to 'immediacy' which...


Explanation:
...is perfectly accepted by the dictionaries. Although 'appropriacy' wasn't in Collins & Webster when I consulted them, it seems reasonable on this basis, combined with it not being terribly ugly and it having a clear meaning to the reader.
I would use 'appropriateness' myself, though.

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Note added at 2003-07-30 04:58:18 (GMT)
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I would argue that even \'inventions\' which conform to the above criteria are not necessarily incorrect, but permissable use of language.

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Note added at 2003-07-30 05:00:42 (GMT)
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typo. \'permissible\'.....

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Note added at 2003-07-30 05:38:39 (GMT)
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My argument would be that as \'immediateness\', and \'appropriateness\' are both qualities of something, and the dictionaries accept \'immediacy\', there is no reasonable justification for the dictionaries reject \'appropriacy\' (even though Collins & Webster\'s dictionaries don\'t appear to contain it), since it isn\'t ugly or confusing.
I would use \'appropriateness\' myself, and that is the widely used form (sanctioned by Collins & Webster\'s dictionaries :-))

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Note added at 2003-07-30 06:06:00 (GMT)
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Although \'inappropriateness\' is much more widely used on the internet, the organizations using \'inappropriacy\' there are highly respectable - including governmental, prestigous educational and academic organizations from New Zealand, Australia, the US and Britain.

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Note added at 2003-07-30 07:10:29 (GMT)
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To asker:
the more common \'innappropriateness\' and \'inappropriacy\' seem to me to be largely interchangeable for the reasons I have given
- if an authority was to say that \'inappropriateness, (pl.) inappropriatenesses\' mustn\'t be used, THEN I would be shocked, but it doesn\'t shock me (and as above, I see nothing wrong in) anyone, including a respectable institution, using \'inappropriacy, (pl.) inappropriacies\'.



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Note added at 2003-07-30 07:14:44 (GMT)
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I am grateful for Chris\'s agreement that \'inappropriacy\' isn\'t incorrect, after all :-)).
It is used by a number of separate respectable authors, eg:
(teacher training)www.teacherdevelopment.net/Authors/Articles/scott-thornbury...
(mental health)www.mentalnurse.org.uk/Pages/mhbillresponse/node22.html -


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Note added at 2003-07-30 07:38:58 (GMT)
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It is true (as Chris poins out) that most of the on-line references to the plural form \'inappropriateness\', amusingly (suspiciously, if you don\'t like the form :-), originate from the IELTS sentence, although:
www.oise.utoronto.ca/~gwells/resources/Portfolio.html
is an example from an educated North American user.

The point I would make, is that while I have always used \'appropriateness\', it is a mistake to rush to set up grammatical rules unless there are special reasons why they are necessary - sometimes rational forms can co-exist happily side by side.
\'-cy\' and \'-ness\' are both suffixes available in language for users to indicate a quality or characteristic related to something, unless ugliness or confusion results from their use. It would be folly to dogmatically disallow either. In many cases one or the other should be disallowed because a native speaker decides it sounds ugly (eg: disallow \'idiotness\', allow \'lunacy\') - equally if confusion resulted. Neither consideration applies in this case.

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Note added at 2003-07-30 07:39:45 (GMT)
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It is true (as Chris poins out) that most of the on-line references to the plural form \'inappropriateness\', amusingly (suspiciously, if you don\'t like the form :-), originate from the IELTS sentence, although:
www.oise.utoronto.ca/~gwells/resources/Portfolio.html
is an example from an educated North American user.

The point I would make, is that while I have always used \'appropriateness\', it is a mistake to rush to set up grammatical rules unless there are special reasons why they are necessary - sometimes rational forms can co-exist happily side by side.
\'-cy\' and \'-ness\' are both suffixes available in language for users to indicate a quality or characteristic related to something, unless ugliness or confusion results from their use. It would be folly to dogmatically disallow either. In many cases one or the other should be disallowed because a native speaker decides it sounds ugly (eg: disallow \'idiotness\', allow \'lunacy\') - equally if confusion resulted. Neither consideration applies in this case.

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Note added at 2003-07-30 07:42:10 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It is true (as Chris poins out) that most of the on-line references to the plural form \'inappropriateness\', amusingly (suspiciously, if you don\'t like the form :-), originate from the IELTS sentence, although:
www.oise.utoronto.ca/~gwells/resources/Portfolio.html
is an example from an educated North American user.

The point I would make, is that while I have always used \'appropriateness\', it is a mistake to rush to set up grammatical rules unless there are special reasons why they are necessary - sometimes rational forms can co-exist happily side by side.
\'-cy\' and \'-ness\' are both suffixes available in language for users to indicate a quality or characteristic related to something, unless ugliness or confusion results from their use. It would be folly to dogmatically disallow either. In many cases one or the other should be disallowed because a native speaker decides it sounds ugly (eg: disallow \'idiotness\', allow \'lunacy\') - equally if confusion resulted. Neither consideration applies in this case.

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Note added at 2003-07-30 07:46:54 (GMT)
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I am grateful for Chris\'s agreement that \'inappropriacy\' isn\'t incorrect, after all :-)).

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Note added at 2003-08-01 06:49:32 (GMT) Post-grading
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typo.error: \'...references to the plural form \'inappropriacies\', amusingly...\'

DGK T-I
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:04
PRO pts in pair: 401

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Chris Rowson: If you try a Google search for "inappropriacies" you will find many copies of a sentence probably stemming from the IELTS. Try replacing "inappropriacies" in that sentence with "inappropriatenesses" ...
1 hr
  -> No.Obvious from answer above that I've done that,&different authors use the form,eg:(teacher training)www.teacherdevelopment.net/Authors/Articles/scott-thornbury... health)www.mentalnurse.org.uk/Pages/mhbillresponse/node22.html

agree  David Moore: This is a well-reasoned comment with which I concur - I could agree with all three to a very large extent, but who needs Browniz......? I'd use the "...ness" form myself, too
2 hrs
  -> Thank you David ~

agree  Kardi Kho
5 hrs
  -> Thank you K ~

agree  RHELLER: I think it should be used like "beauty", as a quality - it would remain singular
1 day13 mins
  -> Thank you Rita ~ for my own taste, too :-) but I think we should be wary of setting up grammatical rules unless there is a good reason for them

agree  AhmedAMS: Thoughtful answer as usual.
12 days
  -> Thank you Ahmed ~
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
It´s a word, at least in Brit. English


Explanation:
"Inappropriacy" may be a British invention - but isn´t the English language basically a Brit. invention? I have to admit that at first I found the word so odd that I was going to agree with Rita, but then I thought, no, there are contexts in which it would be right. Particularly, the IELTS context.

I think the earth will survive, though, shocked, schocked, or inappropriacy-ridden.

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Note added at 2003-07-30 06:51:29 (GMT)
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I don´t agree with Hamo´s view that the \"inappropriacy\" in the Oxford University text referenced is an uncountable, or that the context doesn´t match that in the question, so I guess it probably is a BE thing. The usages seem just the same to me.

We inscrutable Brits ...


    Reference: http://epwww.psych.ox.ac.uk/oscci/dbhtml/abstracts/conversat...
Chris Rowson
Local time: 16:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 243

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jerrie: Google UK has 45 hits using inappropriacy in a valid context.
1 hr

agree  Marie Scarano: the world turns
5 hrs

agree  RHELLER: you are right - I didn't mean it wasn't a word - just that it sounded strange to my American ears
23 hrs
  -> It sounded strange to me too, until I found a context where it´s the right word.

agree  DGK T-I: ;-)
13 days
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
context


Explanation:
Context also matters, as well as style. QV the following:
" A sensitively developed local tutorial system can compensate for any inappropriateness
and also reduce the sense of isolation that any distance student is likely to experience/../ A good local support service can compensate for any inappropriacy
or inadequacy in the materials."


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Note added at 5 hrs 54 mins (2003-07-30 09:55:49 GMT)
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Some Google:
inappropriacy 149 - appropriacy 2,390
inappropriateness 35,600 appropriateness721,000

inadequacy 270,000 - adequacy 1,020,000


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Note added at 5 hrs 57 mins (2003-07-30 09:59:23 GMT)
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inadequateness 963 - adequateness 1,700


    Reference: http://www1.worldbank.org/disted/Management/Governance/iss-0...
Mario Marcolin
Sweden
Local time: 16:04
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
inappropriateness is more "appropriate"


Explanation:
Bartleby has no entry for inappropriacy

inappropriateness. Roget s II: The New Thesaurus, Third Edition. 1995.
...The condition of being improper: improperness, impropriety, unbecomingness, unfitness, unseemliness, unsuitability, unsuitableness. See AGREE, USUAL


unsuitability. Roget s II: The New Thesaurus, Third Edition. 1995.
...The condition of being improper: improperness, impropriety, inappropriateness, unbecomingness, unfitness, unseemliness, unsuitableness. See AGREE, USUAL....


9) improperness. Roget s II: The New Thesaurus, Third Edition. 1995.
...The condition of being improper: impropriety, inappropriateness, unbecomingness, unfitness, unseemliness, unsuitability, unsuitableness. See AGREE, USUAL....


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 55 mins (2003-07-31 04:56:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I agree with all of you that it is sometimes used. I admit it sounds odd to me so I would prefer to use inappropriateness or maybe even unsuitability.

http://www.teflfarm.com/teachers/articles/0/coarse.htm
a site where this term is used to describe the sensitivity of discussions on sex, alcohol and cigarettes in the schools; an \"appropriate\" use, I would think :-)


    Reference: http://www.bartleby.com/cgi-bin/texis/webinator/sitesearch?F...
RHELLER
United States
Local time: 08:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1252
Grading comment
I have awarded Rita my points, because she has struck closest to my heart with regard to the point of my question and the discussion that followed. I also found Mario's research most helpful. Obviously Fuad has correctly captured the IELTS' use of the word in a very concise way.

In closing it seems an inappropriacy that those who invent new words or new uses for old words do not provide at least an explanation for their deviation. Soon I suppose the IELTS will be claiming poetic license.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DGK T-I: :-))
21 mins
  -> thanks Giuli :-)

neutral  Chris Rowson: For many cases I would agree with you, but I thiink there are contexts (or at least one) in which "inappropriacy" is appropriate (though hopefully not an appropriacy :-)
58 mins
  -> Chris you are right and I can only bring the U.S. point of view - never having lived in the UK
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1 day4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Prior to this question, I was not aware of "inappropriacy."


Explanation:
But by examining the online examples, I see that there is a difference in usage between "inapproprateness" and "inappropriacy."

"Inappropriateness" seems to be used to denote the quality of being inappropriate.

"Inappropriacy" seems to be used in reference to an instance of being inappropriate.

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 893
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