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naïve faith

English translation: The faith of a child, the faith of someone lacking knowledge or experience, simplictic faith, purely innocent faith

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:nad've faith
English translation:The faith of a child, the faith of someone lacking knowledge or experience, simplictic faith, purely innocent faith
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21:23 May 31, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Religion / Religion
English term or phrase: naïve faith
I have found this word twice in a religious text. Could you please explain what does it mean?

Thanx in advance,
Monika
Monika Coulson
Local time: 14:00
The faith of a child or the faith of someone lacking knowledge or experiece
Explanation:
I hope this explains more or less what it means in a religious context.
Selected response from:

Anykev
Local time: 16:00
Grading comment
Thank you Anykev and thank you to you all for helping me to understand this word.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +7The faith of a child or the faith of someone lacking knowledge or experiece
Anykev
4 +3simplistic faithChris Rowson
4 +2blind faith
Bill Greendyk
5 +1faith of simple-minded peopleAntonio Costa
5Since it's a religious text, it could have diferent meanings for diferent personsYolanda González
5Since it's a religious text, it could have diferent meanings for diferent personsYolanda González
5A faith that lacks experience, wisdom, or judgement.Sabine H
4 +1purely innocent faith
Chinoise
5Act of total and unconditioned faith.Antonio Camangi


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
purely innocent faith


Explanation:
just a suggestion

Chinoise
Local time: 17:00
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ChineseChinese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Roomy Naqvy: ok
20 hrs
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
blind faith


Explanation:
I would assume it implies a "blind" faith, one which simply believes for the sake of believing, without question or no less understanding what is being believed.

Bill

Bill Greendyk
United States
Local time: 16:00
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jerrie
10 mins

agree  Sue Crocker
2 days15 hrs
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
The faith of a child or the faith of someone lacking knowledge or experiece


Explanation:
I hope this explains more or less what it means in a religious context.

Anykev
Local time: 16:00
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you Anykev and thank you to you all for helping me to understand this word.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxjerryk: Yes. Faith is innocent by its very nature. This must mean faith based on ignorance.
3 mins
  -> Thank you!

agree  Yuri Geifman
20 mins
  -> Thank you!

agree  Berni Armstrong: If the context is positive it'll be that. If it's negative it will be Antonio's option. Context is all here.
35 mins
  -> Thank you!

agree  Bill Greendyk: You´ve got it. "Childlike faith" is often used to describe how real faith should be.
42 mins
  -> Thank you!

agree  John Kinory: As Berni says
1 hr
  -> Thank you!

agree  Roomy Naqvy: absolutely correct answer. Certainly, it is faith which is innocent like that of the child; it is faith without any questioning. It is belief because one believes.
19 hrs
  -> Thank you!

agree  airmailrpl
1 day29 mins
  -> Thank you!
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36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
faith of simple-minded people


Explanation:
This is the kind of faith well defined in Animal Farm and much better preached by politicians and some religions.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-01 18:47:57 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


Ignorance is strength (Orwell\'s 1984)

Antonio Costa

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  John Kinory: Yes, if the context is negative (like that horse - Stakhanovitz? - in Animal Farm)
1 hr
  -> Than you Mr. Kinory. You will certainly agree with me that the plot is the same, the actors would as well be the same, were it not for the fact that they are now two-legged. The stage has not changed much, indeed.

neutral  Roomy Naqvy: I would disagree. George Orwell's Animal Farm presents a much different context. It's essentially a satirical text and would not have any bearing here in this context. I won't like to comment on what is 'two-legged'.
19 hrs
  -> From your reasoning I can then imply that in real life you play the horse, you'll never drink whiskey as pigs do. They wouldn't let you. They'll send you to the slaughterhouse.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
A faith that lacks experience, wisdom, or judgement.


Explanation:
Just another suggestion...

Sabine H
United States
Local time: 13:00
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
simplistic faith


Explanation:
"Naïve" is a loan word from French (naïf, naïve), basically meaning simple. But in English it has a distinct flavour which is not easy to capture otherwise (that´s why we borrowed it), but is indicated by all of the above taken together, perhaps summarised as "simplistic".

Chris Rowson
Local time: 22:00
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxOso: ¶:^)
16 mins

agree  Piotr Kurek: simplistic or naive or gullible (?)
4 hrs

agree  Roberto Cavalcanti
22 hrs
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21 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Act of total and unconditioned faith.


Explanation:
Like a child does, without looking for any rationale nor philosophic support.

Antonio Camangi
Local time: 22:00
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
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1 day5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Since it's a religious text, it could have diferent meanings for diferent persons


Explanation:
This is more of the same from all of the answers from above, but maybe it could help you a little bit more.
Good luck.


na·ive or na·ïve (nī-ēv', nä-) also na·if or na·ïf (nī-ēf', nä).
adj.
Lacking worldly experience and understanding, especially:
Simple and guileless; artless: a child with a naive charm.

Unsuspecting or credulous.
Showing or characterized by a lack of sophistication and critical judgment.
Not previously subjected to experiments: testing naive mice.
Not having previously taken or received a particular drug: persons naive to marijuana.

One who is artless, credulous, or uncritical.

[French naïve, feminine of naïf, from Old French naif, natural, native, from Latin nātīvus, native, rustic, from nātus, past participle of nāscī, to be born.]

na·ive'ly adv.
na·ive'ness n.

SYNONYMS naive, simple, ingenuous, unsophisticated, natural, unaffected, guileless, artless. These adjectives mean free from guile, cunning, or sham. Naive sometimes connotes a credulity that impedes effective functioning in a practical world: “this naive simple creature, with his straightforward and friendly eyes so eager to believe appearances” (Arnold Bennett). Simple stresses absence of complexity, artifice, pretentiousness, or dissimulation: “Those of highest worth and breeding are most simple in manner and attire” (Francis Parkman). “Among simple people she had the reputation of being a prodigy of information” (Harriet Beecher Stowe). Ingenuous denotes childlike directness, simplicity, and innocence; it connotes an inability to mask one's feelings: an ingenuous admission of responsibility. Unsophisticated indicates absence of worldliness: the astonishment of unsophisticated tourists at the tall buildings. Natural stresses spontaneity that is the result of freedom from self-consciousness or inhibitions: “When Kavanagh was present, Alice was happy, but embarrassed; Cecelia, joyous and natural” (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow). Unaffected implies sincerity and lack of affectation: “With men he can be rational and unaffected, but when he has ladies to please, every feature works” (Jane Austen). Guileless signifies absence of insidious or treacherous cunning: a guileless, disarming look. Artless stresses absence of plan or purpose and suggests unconcern for or lack of awareness of the reaction produced in others: a child of artless grace and simple goodness.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-02 03:12:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Could you read it above, or is it just me? Just in case:

[... from Latin nativus, native, rustic, from natus, past participle of nasci, to be born.]






    The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Yolanda González
Local time: 22:00
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
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1 day5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Since it's a religious text, it could have diferent meanings for diferent persons


Explanation:
This is more of the same from all of the answers from above, but maybe it could help you a little bit more.
Good luck.


na·ive or na·ïve (nī-ēv', nä-) also na·if or na·ïf (nī-ēf', nä).
adj.
Lacking worldly experience and understanding, especially:
Simple and guileless; artless: a child with a naive charm.

Unsuspecting or credulous.
Showing or characterized by a lack of sophistication and critical judgment.
Not previously subjected to experiments: testing naive mice.
Not having previously taken or received a particular drug: persons naive to marijuana.

One who is artless, credulous, or uncritical.

[French naïve, feminine of naïf, from Old French naif, natural, native, from Latin nātīvus, native, rustic, from nātus, past participle of nāscī, to be born.]

na·ive'ly adv.
na·ive'ness n.

SYNONYMS naive, simple, ingenuous, unsophisticated, natural, unaffected, guileless, artless. These adjectives mean free from guile, cunning, or sham. Naive sometimes connotes a credulity that impedes effective functioning in a practical world: “this naive simple creature, with his straightforward and friendly eyes so eager to believe appearances” (Arnold Bennett). Simple stresses absence of complexity, artifice, pretentiousness, or dissimulation: “Those of highest worth and breeding are most simple in manner and attire” (Francis Parkman). “Among simple people she had the reputation of being a prodigy of information” (Harriet Beecher Stowe). Ingenuous denotes childlike directness, simplicity, and innocence; it connotes an inability to mask one's feelings: an ingenuous admission of responsibility. Unsophisticated indicates absence of worldliness: the astonishment of unsophisticated tourists at the tall buildings. Natural stresses spontaneity that is the result of freedom from self-consciousness or inhibitions: “When Kavanagh was present, Alice was happy, but embarrassed; Cecelia, joyous and natural” (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow). Unaffected implies sincerity and lack of affectation: “With men he can be rational and unaffected, but when he has ladies to please, every feature works” (Jane Austen). Guileless signifies absence of insidious or treacherous cunning: a guileless, disarming look. Artless stresses absence of plan or purpose and suggests unconcern for or lack of awareness of the reaction produced in others: a child of artless grace and simple goodness.



    The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Yolanda González
Local time: 22:00
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
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