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aitsa

English translation: Exclamation of informal praise or surprise

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Afrikaans term or phrase:aitsa
English translation:Exclamation of informal praise or surprise
Entered by: Johan Venter
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13:43 Feb 10, 2007
Afrikaans to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics / literature
Afrikaans term or phrase: aitsa
I wonder what the Afrikaans term " aitsa " means?

Thank you!
macky
Local time: 17:12
See explanation below
Explanation:
Aitsa does not really mean anything in itself, it is more of a word of exclamation, eg: "Aitsa, look at that" or "Aitsa, he's about to get a hiding!"

It is also used as an exclamation to indicate something nice, e.g. Aitsa, what a nice girl/car/house, etc.

I am not sure of the origins of the word itself, though I guess it comes from one of the other local languages. The original meaning is lost on most Afrikaans speakers, however, and it is used in the sense as given above, whether this is correct in terms of the original meaning or not.
Selected response from:

Johan Venter
Czech Republic
Local time: 11:12
Grading comment
Thank you for help!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3See explanation below
Johan Venter
4 +1wow, good grief, I say
Samuel Murray
4 -3go well!
swisstell


  

Answers


24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -3
An Afrikaans term
go well!


Explanation:
'May you go wisely and slowly'? It just means 'go well'!


    Reference: http://blogs.guardian.co.uk/travelog/2006/09/post_26.html
swisstell
Italy
Local time: 11:12
Native speaker of: German

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Johan Venter: Not quite
33 mins

disagree  Kim Metzger: Ay, yay yaaay! Shoemaker, stick to your last.
1 hr

disagree  Samuel Murray: It may mean "go well" in some neighbourhood slang, but that is not the general meaning.
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
An Afrikaans term
See explanation below


Explanation:
Aitsa does not really mean anything in itself, it is more of a word of exclamation, eg: "Aitsa, look at that" or "Aitsa, he's about to get a hiding!"

It is also used as an exclamation to indicate something nice, e.g. Aitsa, what a nice girl/car/house, etc.

I am not sure of the origins of the word itself, though I guess it comes from one of the other local languages. The original meaning is lost on most Afrikaans speakers, however, and it is used in the sense as given above, whether this is correct in terms of the original meaning or not.

Johan Venter
Czech Republic
Local time: 11:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thank you for help!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kim Metzger: Nice explanation.
32 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  xxxJon O
1 hr
  -> Thanks

agree  Samuel Murray: See my quote from the etymology dictionary
2 hrs
  -> Thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
wow, good grief, I say


Explanation:
I agree with Johan Venter, but here is an entry from the WAT's Afrikaans etymology dictionary (translated):

"aits (interjection). Also haits, haitsa, heits and heitsa. Exclamation of informal praise or surprise. From Nama aise, also written in the reduplication form ei sä, ei sä (1811), eisey, eisey! (1837)."

I must say that I've never heard any of the forms given -- the only form I'm at all familiar with, is "aitsa".

Samuel Murray
Netherlands
Local time: 11:12
Native speaker of: Native in AfrikaansAfrikaans

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Johan Venter: Thank you for this info - Pity the dictionary did not offer an explanation as to what the original meaning of the word was
1 day19 hrs
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Changes made by editors
Feb 10, 2007 - Changes made by Kim Metzger:
Term askedAn Afrikaans term » aitsa


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