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Kid games

English translation: Knukle - bones / Tangook

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Arabic term or phrase:لعب الكعاب من العظام / لعب الدكوك
English translation:Knukle - bones / Tangook
Entered by: Tharaa Hafez
Options:
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21:10 Dec 28, 2002
Arabic to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Arabic term or phrase: Kid games
In lebanon , there are games , kids used to play .
لعب الكعاب من العظام ؛ لعب الدكوك . Thier description is :
لعب الدكوك من عيدان يضرب بها الاحداث الواحد بعد الاخر في الوحل , عندما تلين الارض أيام الشتاء و كلما ضرب أحدهم الدك و أسقط دكوك رفاقه المغروسة في الوحل الى الارض كلها و أخذها

Just a term in English for such games لعب الكعاب من العظام و لعب الدكوك

Thank you very much
Saraa
Tharaa Hafez
Egypt
Local time: 13:47
dakook
Explanation:
The game is played in many parts of the world. It has different names and slightly different forms in different places. Here is an example:

http://archives.obs-us.com/obs/english/books/Mandela/achap02...

Where I grew up, we called it TANGOOR. We used pieces of palm branches.

I would suggest you stick to the Lebanese name. If the context calls for a generic name, I would call it "sticks".


Fuad

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-12-30 04:54:48 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here is Nelson Mandela explaining how he played the game when he was a child. Notice how the game takes on a slightly different form. Notice also that the game has a local name, which Mandela does not try to translate. The basic elements of the game are the same: Sticks planted in a soft, somewhat muddy ground, and the competing boys use their sticks to knok their opponents\'s sticks down:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/mandela/boy/bo...

\"The most popular game for boys was thinti, and like most boys\' games it was a youthful approximation of war. Two sticks, used as targets, would be driven firmly into the ground in an upright position about one hundred feet apart. The goal of the game was for each team to hurl sticks at the opposing target and knock it down. We each defended our own target and attempted to prevent the other side from retrieving the sticks that had been thrown over. As we grew older, we organized matches against boys from neighboring villages, and those who distinguished themselves in these fraternal battles were greatly admired, as generals who achieve great victories in war are justly celebrated.\"

Long Walk to Freedom, Chapter 2.
Selected response from:

Fuad Yahya
Grading comment
Thank you Sirs.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1dakookFuad Yahya
4Play at Knuckle-bonessktrans


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
dakook


Explanation:
The game is played in many parts of the world. It has different names and slightly different forms in different places. Here is an example:

http://archives.obs-us.com/obs/english/books/Mandela/achap02...

Where I grew up, we called it TANGOOR. We used pieces of palm branches.

I would suggest you stick to the Lebanese name. If the context calls for a generic name, I would call it "sticks".


Fuad

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-12-30 04:54:48 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here is Nelson Mandela explaining how he played the game when he was a child. Notice how the game takes on a slightly different form. Notice also that the game has a local name, which Mandela does not try to translate. The basic elements of the game are the same: Sticks planted in a soft, somewhat muddy ground, and the competing boys use their sticks to knok their opponents\'s sticks down:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/mandela/boy/bo...

\"The most popular game for boys was thinti, and like most boys\' games it was a youthful approximation of war. Two sticks, used as targets, would be driven firmly into the ground in an upright position about one hundred feet apart. The goal of the game was for each team to hurl sticks at the opposing target and knock it down. We each defended our own target and attempted to prevent the other side from retrieving the sticks that had been thrown over. As we grew older, we organized matches against boys from neighboring villages, and those who distinguished themselves in these fraternal battles were greatly admired, as generals who achieve great victories in war are justly celebrated.\"

Long Walk to Freedom, Chapter 2.

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2542
Grading comment
Thank you Sirs.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bilal
21 hrs
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1 day5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Play at Knuckle-bones


Explanation:
This is for "al ka'ab".
Usually 4 bones that you shake and throw just as would with dice.
Later, bones were replaced with a plastic version.
Played it as a child.


    Harrap's
sktrans
Local time: 07:47
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 373
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