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شعبي

English translation: popular

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Arabic term or phrase:شعبي
English translation:popular
Entered by: Waleed Mohamed
Options:
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13:14 Mar 29, 2005
Arabic to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Government / Politics
Arabic term or phrase: شعبي
لقد تحولت ألبانيا في أعقاب التمرد الشعبي في ربيع 1997 إلى مركزا للمنظمات الدولية ذات الأنشطة المشبوهة

I often get confused when translating this word شعبي

Many thanks
Waleed Mohamed
Egypt
Local time: 17:39
popular
Explanation:
That is what is usually intended.

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Note added at 4 mins (2005-03-29 13:18:15 GMT)
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The writer may also have meant \"grassroot.\" It is hard to pin down what the writer meant, but I think popular covers the ballpark.

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Note added at 1 day 10 hrs 33 mins (2005-03-30 23:47:40 GMT)
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From the comments of mosbadr200, Randa F, and ennan below, there seems to be some confusion regarding the expressions \"popular revolt\" and \"people\'s revolt.\" Although very close in meaning, they are actually quite distinct in flavor and intention.

Expressions like \"People\'s Republic\" or \"People\'s Army\" carry an unmistakable hint of endorsement. The intended implication is that these things in fact represent \"the people\" in a legitimate way. Such expressions tend to be used in doctrinaire statements.

On the other hand, expressions like \"popular uprising\" or \"popular revolt\" do not carry such an explicit endorsement. The intended implication is simply that the events involved an observable sweeping sentiment and was carried out by a large number of people in a spontaneous fashion. No inherent legitimacy or lasting postive value is attached by virtue of the popular nature of the even. One may conclude a degree of legitimacy based on the grassroots nature of the event, but that would be conclusion taken, not conclusion given.

Therefore, any writer may refer to a revolt as a popular revolt, if it is clearly popularly based, but only doctrinare supports of the revolt would call it \"people\'s revolt.\" In order to choose which expression to use in your translation, you need to be sure of the specific posture of the writer. If you are not certain, then \"popular\" is the safe choice, because it is neutral and is used by both supporters and non-partisan observers alike.
Selected response from:

Fuad Yahya
Grading comment
Thank you all
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +18popularFuad Yahya
4 +1people's revoltennan
3publicdonfaidhy


  

Answers


1 day1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
التمرد الشعبي
people's revolt


Explanation:
because there isn't a word for word translation for this word in this context so it is better described translated with the word accompanying it

ennan
Local time: 17:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in ArabicArabic

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alexander Yeltsov
20 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +18
شعبي
popular


Explanation:
That is what is usually intended.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 mins (2005-03-29 13:18:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The writer may also have meant \"grassroot.\" It is hard to pin down what the writer meant, but I think popular covers the ballpark.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 10 hrs 33 mins (2005-03-30 23:47:40 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

From the comments of mosbadr200, Randa F, and ennan below, there seems to be some confusion regarding the expressions \"popular revolt\" and \"people\'s revolt.\" Although very close in meaning, they are actually quite distinct in flavor and intention.

Expressions like \"People\'s Republic\" or \"People\'s Army\" carry an unmistakable hint of endorsement. The intended implication is that these things in fact represent \"the people\" in a legitimate way. Such expressions tend to be used in doctrinaire statements.

On the other hand, expressions like \"popular uprising\" or \"popular revolt\" do not carry such an explicit endorsement. The intended implication is simply that the events involved an observable sweeping sentiment and was carried out by a large number of people in a spontaneous fashion. No inherent legitimacy or lasting postive value is attached by virtue of the popular nature of the even. One may conclude a degree of legitimacy based on the grassroots nature of the event, but that would be conclusion taken, not conclusion given.

Therefore, any writer may refer to a revolt as a popular revolt, if it is clearly popularly based, but only doctrinare supports of the revolt would call it \"people\'s revolt.\" In order to choose which expression to use in your translation, you need to be sure of the specific posture of the writer. If you are not certain, then \"popular\" is the safe choice, because it is neutral and is used by both supporters and non-partisan observers alike.

Fuad Yahya
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 213
Grading comment
Thank you all

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ahmadwadan.com: http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?tocId=9036901
17 mins

agree  Emma Loghin: "1997 was a tumultuous and tragic year for Albania, in which approximately 2,000 people lost their lives during a popular revolt..." from: http://www.hrw.org/worldreport/Helsinki-01.htm
33 mins

agree  Hussam
1 hr

agree  Alaa Zeineldine: The meaning is clear based on the events that took place in Albania. Any combination of popular/street uprising/revolt can be used to descrive those events.
1 hr

agree  Mutarjim97
1 hr

agree  Dina Abdo
1 hr

agree  Aisha Maniar
1 hr

agree  sktrans
1 hr

agree  shfranke: A related and variant adjective is "people's" as in "people's self-defense forces"
2 hrs
  -> I agree that "people's" is a related term, but it is usually employed in statements by doctrinaire partisans, while "popular" still retains a measure of neutrality. It admits the widespread nature of the revolt, without giving it outright endorsement.

agree  Saleh Ayyub
5 hrs

agree  Version Legal & Patent
5 hrs

agree  ena
6 hrs

agree  Amal Al-Arfaj
7 hrs

neutral  mosbadr200: We usually prefer 'people's rebellion' because 'popular' may have a different connotation like 'a popular song'.
16 hrs
  -> Who is "we"?

agree  Dr. Wathib Jabouri
19 hrs

neutral  Randa F: agree with Stephen and Mosbadr, People's Revolt/Rebellion rather than 'popular'!
1 day25 mins
  -> Stephen and Mosbadr disagree on this point. Which view do you support?

disagree  ennan: popular is a word tha is used to describe the peoples inclinment towards a certain matter. I agree with mosbadr200 'peoples rebellion' is a much better discription
1 day1 hr
  -> Your unfamiliarity with "popular" in this sense can easily be remedied by a corroborative search. The Hungarian Uprising of 1956, the Paris Uprising of 1944, and the Albanian Revolt of 1997 were all popular revolts, and Fayrooz is a popular singer.

agree  A Nabil Bouitieh
1 day6 hrs

agree  Mazyoun
1 day7 hrs

agree  Suleiman Al Saqer: Good
2 days6 hrs

agree  donfaidhy: public revolt
3 days17 hrs

agree  AhmedAMS
8 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 days17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
شعبي
public


Explanation:
I suggest this term because once I have translated a guide for an organization and they told me that "public revolt" is usually used and the accident of revolt I translated were in Bosnia.

donfaidhy
Local time: 18:39
Native speaker of: Native in ArapahoArapaho
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