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أما بعد

English translation: punctuation and a new paragrap

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09:58 Feb 13, 2005
Arabic to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Arabic term or phrase: أما بعد
هل يوجد مقابل إنجليزي معين لهذا التعبير والذي يردفي عبارات مثل:
بسم الله، والصلاة والسلام على رسول الله، ....، أما بعد،
Waleed Mohamed
United Arab Emirates
Local time: 23:48
English translation:punctuation and a new paragrap
Explanation:
This question was posted a long time ago. You may want to consult the archives.

Words such as أما بعد are evocative of an era when language was mostly a spoken phenomenon, even when it was actually written. Even in its written form, Classical Arabic had man of the characteristics of oral delivery. That is one reason Arabic writings are full of the conjunction "and."

In later developments in European writing, punctuation marks acquired many important functions, replacing words and changing the way we write and even (ironically), the way we speak. Modern Standard Arabic has adopted many of these new conventions, albeit not consistently.

The expression أما بعد is a segmentation tool. It simply serves to announce that the preceding part was a preamble, and what was to follow was to be the body of the message. Today, when we write anything strucured in this manner, we simply stop with an appropriate punctuation (comma, colon, or period, depending on convention), then we start a new paragraph.

If we translating into English, and we want to impart the flavor of the old style, we can use an expression that serves to announce the body of the message, such as:

"Now, ..."
"Having said so, ..."
"With that in mind, ..."

The choice would depend on the topic and the style.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs 9 mins (2005-02-13 18:08:01 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Corrections:

Classical Arabic had many of the characteristics...

If we are translating into English, ...

I apologize for th errors

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs 15 mins (2005-02-13 20:13:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Remember that when we translate, we have an obligation not only to be faithful to the intent of the source text, but also to conform to the conventions of the target language. Otherwise, what we offer the reader would hardly make sense.

Although the suggested \"translations\" above may seem to satisfy the perceived need to account for every word and tittle in the source text, they are, in my opinion, superfluous. The proper approach is to recognize that the words أما بعد have no cognitive content. They only serve as a transiton between the preamble and the body. In the conventions of modern English, placing words to effect such a transition would be out of place. To effect such a transition, you simply pause with a period, then start a new paragraph, sometimes leaving a blank line.

In oral delivery, the speaker makes a similar transitional pause that clearly signals to the audience that the preceding part was just the \"warm up,\" and that the serious part is about to begin. The tone of voice and the facial expression may sometimes change to reflect the transition as well.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs 26 mins (2005-02-13 21:24:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

One reason many traditional Islamic texts in English translation read so stale, odd, and misleading is that the translators employed by traditional Islamic advocacy houses that publish such material are often unfamiliar with the conventions of the target language for which they were hired. This unfamiliarity, especially when coupled with a piously literal approach to the original text, often produces odd-sounding word strings with skewed meaning, if any meaning at all.

One example is the widespread practice of translating every occurrence of the word إنّ to \"certainly,\" \"verily,\" \"surely,\" or something to that effect. Somewhere in the translators\' education, they were taught that إنّ تفيد التوكيد, whereupon they proceed to place \"verily\" in every sentence.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 hrs 28 mins (2005-02-14 00:26:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

These same translators also commit the same error when they encounter the word قد or لقد in a Classical Arabic text.
Selected response from:

Fuad Yahya
Grading comment
Thanks a lot for this generous help, and thanks to all colleagues for their useful suggestions
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1punctuation and a new paragrapFuad Yahya
5depends entirely on...
Aisha Maniar
5Than , after comes,
Suleiman Al Saqer
3 +1to commence
ena


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
أما بعد
depends entirely on...


Explanation:
1 - context
2 - audience
The terms cited obviously only exist in an Islamic text. If you are translating a hadith, a saying of one of the Prophet Muhammad (S)'s companions or a khutba or speech, you can use, ""following on from that", "and what follows".
If you are going from the introduction to the main topic of your piece, you can say "the main topic of which/this is..."
Sometimes it is not relevant to translate this term at all and at other times, completely dependent on the audience, the term is kept in transliteration as "amma ba'd".
For your particular question, it depends totally on the context which you have not provided. I hope that helps, Aisha


Aisha Maniar
Local time: 20:48
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
أما بعد
to commence


Explanation:
in Iqraa tv channel i always find this translation
أما بعد = to commence

ena
United Arab Emirates
Local time: 23:48
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  R Farhat
5 hrs
  -> thanks Randa
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
أما بعد
punctuation and a new paragrap


Explanation:
This question was posted a long time ago. You may want to consult the archives.

Words such as أما بعد are evocative of an era when language was mostly a spoken phenomenon, even when it was actually written. Even in its written form, Classical Arabic had man of the characteristics of oral delivery. That is one reason Arabic writings are full of the conjunction "and."

In later developments in European writing, punctuation marks acquired many important functions, replacing words and changing the way we write and even (ironically), the way we speak. Modern Standard Arabic has adopted many of these new conventions, albeit not consistently.

The expression أما بعد is a segmentation tool. It simply serves to announce that the preceding part was a preamble, and what was to follow was to be the body of the message. Today, when we write anything strucured in this manner, we simply stop with an appropriate punctuation (comma, colon, or period, depending on convention), then we start a new paragraph.

If we translating into English, and we want to impart the flavor of the old style, we can use an expression that serves to announce the body of the message, such as:

"Now, ..."
"Having said so, ..."
"With that in mind, ..."

The choice would depend on the topic and the style.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs 9 mins (2005-02-13 18:08:01 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Corrections:

Classical Arabic had many of the characteristics...

If we are translating into English, ...

I apologize for th errors

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs 15 mins (2005-02-13 20:13:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Remember that when we translate, we have an obligation not only to be faithful to the intent of the source text, but also to conform to the conventions of the target language. Otherwise, what we offer the reader would hardly make sense.

Although the suggested \"translations\" above may seem to satisfy the perceived need to account for every word and tittle in the source text, they are, in my opinion, superfluous. The proper approach is to recognize that the words أما بعد have no cognitive content. They only serve as a transiton between the preamble and the body. In the conventions of modern English, placing words to effect such a transition would be out of place. To effect such a transition, you simply pause with a period, then start a new paragraph, sometimes leaving a blank line.

In oral delivery, the speaker makes a similar transitional pause that clearly signals to the audience that the preceding part was just the \"warm up,\" and that the serious part is about to begin. The tone of voice and the facial expression may sometimes change to reflect the transition as well.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs 26 mins (2005-02-13 21:24:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

One reason many traditional Islamic texts in English translation read so stale, odd, and misleading is that the translators employed by traditional Islamic advocacy houses that publish such material are often unfamiliar with the conventions of the target language for which they were hired. This unfamiliarity, especially when coupled with a piously literal approach to the original text, often produces odd-sounding word strings with skewed meaning, if any meaning at all.

One example is the widespread practice of translating every occurrence of the word إنّ to \"certainly,\" \"verily,\" \"surely,\" or something to that effect. Somewhere in the translators\' education, they were taught that إنّ تفيد التوكيد, whereupon they proceed to place \"verily\" in every sentence.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 hrs 28 mins (2005-02-14 00:26:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

These same translators also commit the same error when they encounter the word قد or لقد in a Classical Arabic text.

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 74
Grading comment
Thanks a lot for this generous help, and thanks to all colleagues for their useful suggestions

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mona Helal: I posted a similar question a while back [وبعد] . The reply was "thereafter,". I used this term whenever I encountered this word, even though I wasn't completely happy with it, only because I had to stick to the text. I prefer your suggestions though.
1 hr
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1 day4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
أما بعد
Than , after comes,


Explanation:
Than , after comes (or) ...and There, follow the following.(or)...that before I say the following.
أعتقد أنه لا بد من أئيجاد ترجمة لهذه العبارة المهمة

أولا : أنه من الثابت أنه تشكل جزء من بعض خطب النبي صلى الله عليه وسلم
كما هو ثابت في الصحيح

ثانيا : أنها تشكل جزءا من العلوم الأسلامية لما هو مأثور في الخطب النبوية وخطب ومجالس العلم للسلف الصالح وعلماء الأمة، فكيف نغفل عن ترجمة عبارة بهذا الأنتشار الشديد ؟؟
والله أعلم

أخوكم : سليمان سعود الصقر

Suleiman Al Saqer
Jordan
Local time: 22:48
Works in field
Native speaker of: Arabic
PRO pts in category: 4
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