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qarin

Spanish translation: 1. Qarin, carín, espíritu acompañante; ángel que registra las buenas y malas acciones. 2. Demonio que inspira malas acciones

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Arabic term or phrase:qarin
Spanish translation:1. Qarin, carín, espíritu acompañante; ángel que registra las buenas y malas acciones. 2. Demonio que inspira malas acciones
Entered by: arnau
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02:12 Nov 9, 2003
Arabic to Spanish translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Arabic term or phrase: qarin
a Cairo fortune-teller diagnosed an angry qarin
Laura
qarin o espíritu acompañante
Explanation:
Qariin, in English transliteration usually "qareen", means 'comrade, companion', and it is a Quranic term (appearing in the following ayaat or verses: 4:38; 16:43:36,38; 50:23; 50:27). In this context it has usually a negative interpretation; in fact it means a kind of spirit who encourages the person to do evil deeds, and so some interpret it as an evil spirit or an aspect of the Devil (Shaytan) himself. Not all 'qareens' in the Qur'an are identified with evil spirits, however, and sometimes it may represent the angel who records all deeds of human beings, good and bad.

Here it seems that the fortune-teller had diagnosed the presence or inspiration of a devilish (angry) spirit; therefore a Spanish rendering could go as this: "el diagnóstico de la adivina [o adivino] cairota era que su qarin no estaba de buen talante" / "...que tenía un qarin gruñón", or something of this sort, according to context.

I would not look for an equivalent in Spanish for 'qarin': it is a culture-specific word, and our translation should convey the idea that there is more to it than a simple equivalent. At most, a binary solution would suffice: "su qarin o espíritu acompañante se había levantado con el pie izquierdo", for example. (Qarin always in italics, not in inverted commas). If we want to push the text a bit more towards familiarisation, "carín" in italics would do just as fine.

Note that the Spanish "tener mal genio" seems to be inspired in a similar concept!
Selected response from:

arnau
Grading comment
Le agradezco su ayuda, infinitas gracias.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1qarin o espíritu acompañantearnau
4qarinLarbi


  

Answers


1 day16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
qarin o espíritu acompañante


Explanation:
Qariin, in English transliteration usually "qareen", means 'comrade, companion', and it is a Quranic term (appearing in the following ayaat or verses: 4:38; 16:43:36,38; 50:23; 50:27). In this context it has usually a negative interpretation; in fact it means a kind of spirit who encourages the person to do evil deeds, and so some interpret it as an evil spirit or an aspect of the Devil (Shaytan) himself. Not all 'qareens' in the Qur'an are identified with evil spirits, however, and sometimes it may represent the angel who records all deeds of human beings, good and bad.

Here it seems that the fortune-teller had diagnosed the presence or inspiration of a devilish (angry) spirit; therefore a Spanish rendering could go as this: "el diagnóstico de la adivina [o adivino] cairota era que su qarin no estaba de buen talante" / "...que tenía un qarin gruñón", or something of this sort, according to context.

I would not look for an equivalent in Spanish for 'qarin': it is a culture-specific word, and our translation should convey the idea that there is more to it than a simple equivalent. At most, a binary solution would suffice: "su qarin o espíritu acompañante se había levantado con el pie izquierdo", for example. (Qarin always in italics, not in inverted commas). If we want to push the text a bit more towards familiarisation, "carín" in italics would do just as fine.

Note that the Spanish "tener mal genio" seems to be inspired in a similar concept!

arnau
Native speaker of: Native in CatalanCatalan, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 8
Grading comment
Le agradezco su ayuda, infinitas gracias.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Larbi: Simplemente aٌadir que la palabra qarيn a secas, tiene un sentido mلs amplio, el de acompaٌante, el que tiene tus mismas condiciones de edad y sexo ...usلndose para hacer alusiَn al angel de guarda , al gini o a alguien que se te parezca o te acompaٌe .
319 days
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321 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
qarin


Explanation:
Simplemente añadir que la palabra qarín a secas, tiene un sentido más amplio, el de acompañante, el que tiene tus mismas condiciones de edad y sexo ...usándose para hacer alusión al angel de guarda , al gini o a alguien que se te parezca o te acompañe

Larbi
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 8
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PRO (2): arnau, Larbi


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